Time to be with your loved ones

Time to be with loved ones

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22

I personally have the 1.8 and my friend the 1.4. Obviously the 1.4 is much better build quality and fairly better optically, but the 1.8 is a bargain and still a good lens as long as you don't plan on throwing it around. Also more easily replaced if it breaks. Both give pleasing pictures and both will be better in low light than your current lens... but.. ...


16

I'd say the best thing you can do is embrace the limitations that your gear imposes on you. There is nothing quite like having some restrictions to encourage creativity. At the end of the day you can make amazing photographs using almost any equipment, it is the idea and how you express that idea which matters. Less is often more. Given your 50mm you ...


14

You have all of my sympathy, because a few years back I was in the exact same position as you are (well to be honest, I'm still on the budget). So, with only some point & shoot experience, this is what I did. This might be partially subjective rant, but I think it offers a good beginner perspective when considering the first lens. After gazillion hours ...


10

While you say that you're having problems due to "not having faster lenses", I'm not quite sure that's true - you've got an f/1.8 lens, which is over a stop faster than all those big white 70-200 L zooms. I'd look at this more as "what can you do with a fast 50mm lens?". 50 mm on a crop body is just about classic portrait length; as Nir has suggested, a ...


8

For HDRs you don't need anything special, just any tripod that can sustain the weight of your camera will do. So select by price, weight, robustness (choose any two). If you want to take panoramas too, consider buying a tripod with interchangeable heads. Regarding the head. I find ball heads easier to use in most situations, you can compose quicker. But ...


7

From my experience, when it comes to product photography, in order to make impressive images you really cannot end up using the available light - at least without modification. First thing I'd rule out is the on-camera flash (either built in or external). Forget about using it unless you want a flat and blah image. Then you probably want to take care for ...


7

The 18-55 IS kit lens is actually an excellent lens, especially for the money. It covers the normal walkaround range, is stabilized, and is surprisingly sharp. Getting this is a no-brainer. (Not getting its older brother, the 18-55 without IS, is equally a non-brainer; that was an absolute piece of dreck). Replacing it means spending quite a lot of money if ...


7

The 50mm f1.8 (or the 'nifty fifty' as both this example and Nikon's version are often known) would be a great step up for portraits from the kit lens, regardless of low-light or not. In other words, it's a good first portrait lens AND works well in low light. I got one at Christmas last year, and have very much enjoyed learning how to shoot differently ...


7

You can work around most equipment limitations, it won't be as reliable and easy to use as the "official" solution but it can be made to work. For example, if you want the "classic" wide angle landscape shot you can do a panorama (just remember to set manual mode, manual focus and manual white balance) If you want to shoot macro you can reverse your lens - ...


6

I've got to point out this almost-classic article by Thom Hogan on how to save $700 on a tripod. It specifically mentions the $75 tripod as the first wasted money. :) I don't really think that everyone needs the $1000 tripod that he suggests, but I do think that if you're planning to use the tripod for more than the occasional family-christmas shot, it's ...


6

For around $340 you could pick up a Canon S95 that is a very capable camera, but still fits in your pocket and can do things similar to a DSLR(debatable). This is a very opinionated answer, but I believe this camera is a great way to start with photography, and learn what areas limit your artistic vision - then allow you to make a better choice when ...


5

The nifty fifty (50mm f1.8) will always be suggested as a "must have" lens in any camera kit due to it's great value. It's true that it's a great lens for the money. However as a beginner you may find it a bit too long for most situations, if you have an EFS camera. For portraits, it's brilliant. If you have the spare cash it's a no brainer.


5

You should really consider MF lenses. I started with kit lens on a D90, and then, bought some mid level lenes, like the 24-120 f/4 (which I love). I moved to a D700, and was able to reuse most of my lenses (sold the ones that were DX). But frankly, the lenses I have (VR, AF, zoom, ED) are pretty expensive for the performance (you get what you pay for). Don't ...


5

As a former owner of the Canon 50mm/f1.8 lens, and a current owner of the Canon 50mm/f1.4 lens, I can say the most noticeable difference between the two is build quality. I was very pleased with the photos I took with my 50mm/f1.8. I didn't replace it until I dropped it (from about 4 feet onto soft ground), and it broke in two. I then decided to upgrade ...


4

Does your choice have to be limited to Nikon lenses? One of my favorite lenses (for my Nikon D7000) is an old Russian Helios 44-2 58mm f/2 lens. I can only focus manually, and I can't focus at infinity, but it's very sharp, and gives interesting bokeh. I bought mine for $39 off eBay, including the adapter, but you can get an adapter (M42 lens to Nikon) for ...


4

Several of the later AF and early AF-D families of Nikkors released in the 1990s were good lenses. I still use these two regularly: AF Zoom Nikkor 35-80mm f/4.0-5.6D . If you can find enough light to shoot with this lens, it turns in sharp, contrasty images. I pull this one out when I'm going to be shooting outdoors and don't want to juggle primes or ...


4

Look at some GOOD review sites. Use the parameter selectors on such sites to select what you value most. One of the best is DPREVIW Also well spoken of although somewhat less formal and more "chatty" is Steve's Digicams but there are many others. Few major camera review sites are going to be scathing about cameras from major manufacturers - they rely on ...


4

Simple You will probably want to think about 3 things (assuming you have a camera already!) I'm concentrating on low-cost options. Background A white-painted wall is a great start Lights A single strobe with a stand and a shoot-through umbrella is a good start here. You will need a way to trigger it - a cable is functional and cheap. Props ...


3

I have both. I regret buying the 50mm f/1.8 after seeing how well built the 50mm f/1.4 is. Like Flimzy, I dropped my lens together with my camera, the difference is that the one I dropped is the 50mm f/1.4, it did not break. Nothing happened to it, I picked it up and it just work. On a side note, the bokeh is far better on the 1.4. The site featured ...


3

At the risk of being controversial, I'd suggest a good quality stills camera, that offers HD video capability; something like the Canon T2i (in the US) which appears to be a bit above your budget at around 750 USD. With the larger sensor in a DSLR, you'll be able to get more of a cinematic effect with wide apertures, and the associated shallow depth of ...


3

First and foremost, sufficient flash power is necessary. Flash power is measured in guide numbers. With guide numbers higher is more powerful. At a given ISO and focal length, the guide number is the aperture times the distance to the subject. For example, a guide number of 100 should be able to expose a subject at f/4 that is 25 feet away. It's also ...


2

Probably not "beer budget", but here are my choices for good, sharp, affordable Nikon-brand lenses. 50mm f/1.8G. About $200 new. Sharp in the centre wide open, not bad in the corners, especially stopped down to f/2.8. 85mm f/1.8G. About $400 new. Fantastic portrait lens. Sharp, even in the corners, wide open. 24-85mm f/3.5-4.5G AF-S VR. About $400 new. ...


2

I bought some good manual focus ones (AI or AI-S) very inexpensively: AI 35mm f/2 AI-s 55mm f/2.8 micro AI-s 105mm f/2.5 AI 135mm f/3.5 AI 200mm f/4.0 They are all very sharp (even sharper than the more modern zoom I have), especially the 55mm (ok it is a micro) and the 105mm. Even the 200mm is quite good because it is already at it's maximum ...


2

You'd be nuts to not consider any of the older MF lenses. The D700 should have a decently bright view-finder compared to any of the DX cameras so should be pretty decent for that purpose. Of the current crop of AF lenses, the Nikon 70-300 VR lens is rated fairly highly on the D700. It's not exactly bargain basement prices, but offers fairly good quality for ...


2

On the cheap, the Olymnpus PEN E-PL1 can be an option: Ability to shoot telephoto and wide-angle shots - YES Ability to shoot for slow-motion (If fps can be configured, then great!) - NO (But I have a Casio EX-FH100 and the slowmo at 400 fps is mind boggling) However, shooting this camera with the Diorama art filter on gives the video a stop motion/time ...


2

Assuming that you are, in fact, looking for a still camera that can shoot video, this is a tough combination of requirements. I'm not sure if you're going to find one camera that does all these things. The just-announced Nikon D3100 may be one of the best fits out there, though it's a little North of your budget. There are a few other options that are ...


2

You definitely can get a tripod for $75 - it wouldn't be a good tripod but it's better than nothing. It will usually be an aluminum tripod with a built in 3-way head, you can those tripods in any photo store (and usually in non-photo electronic stores), just make sure it can hold your camera's weight. Those cheap tripods are better than nothing - but you ...


2

OK. That's easy. The EF 50mm f1.8 offers the best bang for the buck on the market. I recently bought one for $128 new. It's fast, it's easy to use and the focal length has lent itself to many of the greatest images made. Down side? It's not a robust build. If you're roughing it, this lens may not handle the grind.


2

as I see the price limit, I would recommend some compact camera (not possible to have new DSLR for such price) - personally would suggest some Panasonic Lumix - they have very good price/performance ration. Just try to choose some with optical stabilizer (I think the cheapest do not have it, so have a look). They have good lenses in this price level and are ...



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