Antarctica

Antarctica
by ʇolɐǝz ǝɥʇ qoq

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2

A quick read of the manual and specs suggests that camera doesn't have a bulb mode (which allows you to open the shutter for long periods), and the slowest shutter speed is 30 seconds in 'starry night' mode.


-2

I would prefer to use Adobe Photoshop. If I won't be having such smooth surface . I will use surface blur and some blend modes to appear to like this. Hope you know what I meant to say


4

You need to shoot such a scene just after sunset or just before sunup when there is still just a bit of light in the sky. You need to use a very long exposure time to smooth out the water and give it that ethereal feel. At a very minimum you should expose for 15-20 seconds. Even longer is usually better. You need to use a fairly narrow aperture (high f-...


6

This looks to be a fairly standard long exposure. The shutter speed needs to be slower than the 'period' of the waves (or 1 over the frequency) - this will cause the water to look flat. The colour suggests that the scene is largely moonlit which is why it's quite bright. With most 'sea' waves, you're looking for a shutter speed of about 10 seconds (or more) ...


1

When it comes to filters you can get cheap filters. You can get good filters. But you can't get cheap good filters. There are filters available for 67mm threads that claim to be 6 stop (ND64) filters available for $30 or less. They tend to be of poor optical quality, don't really have the density they claim (most of the cheapest ones are more like 4 stops, ...


2

Well if you buy one from a retail store, you can try it on, take a few sample shots with and without it and see its quality yourself ( it is easier and better to try it before buying and you can see if it suits your tastes )


1

Since the speed of the sun going below horizon depends on date, I suppose you could create a table measuring exposures starting before sunset and then for example every other minute up to 30 minutes. In the table include column with angle of the sun (2, 1, 0, -1, -2...). When you would be taking the actual shot, you could lookup actual angles of the sun at ...


2

Well, it depends on how much desperate you are :-). This picture http://www.astrobin.com/253803/ has been taken with a moon approaching being full, and, by the way, it is muuuuch better than taking frames without the moon but with a poor sky (I wrote it in the comments too) I had no other options, since were I live the clear sky nights are few (strange, ...


0

The shaking can come from: Shutter button being pressed The mirror in the camera (unlikely) Tripod shaking (if the tripod is weak to support the camera) Or it may be related to the flash, is it used outside the socket? It may be causing some balance problems. I think that the shaking might come from the first one, but in case you're already using a ...


-1

First, there is no motion anywhere in the picture, so this rules out the shacking of the tripod or the camera or the table or an earthquake or what else: yes, there strange lights here and there, but if something had really moved you'd have seen it into the entire picture, not just few areas. That said, those are Vacuum tubes (from JJ Electronics, but I ...


1

Your question is confusing, because, I have no clue what is that you are photographing. with an initial flash I gess that "Initial flash" is exposign the bell shaped thing, the column, and the logo. That is why it apears frozen, without moving. Some answers are asumming the tripod stayed still because the bell is sharp, but that is because of the flash....


1

Are you using a filter, even a UVA filter? It looks very much like reflections you often get in dark scenes,where bright objects actually reflect off the primary lens element, then off the back of the filter glass. If you are using a filter, try removing it from the shot. Being this close, there is little separation between the object and reflection, while ...


2

If the room is dark enough then it could well be that either the camera or certain elements of the scene are moving. If the flash is the only illumination bright enough to expose everything, other than the LEDs and the reflections/glow given off by the LEDs, then even if everything were moving the very short duration of the flash will freeze what is not ...


2

Are you using the mirror lock-up feature for this shot? If not, it's possible the motion of the mirror in your camera is causing an initial vibration, resulting in the blurring of the LEDs vacuum tubes. Try the same shot again, but using the mirror lock-up function of your camera. Edit: New theory. I don't believe there are any LEDs in the image. There are ...


2

I do not think your tripod or table is moving, the solid items in the photo are stable and sharp. What your seeing is most likely related to the light from the LED's reflecting or refracting off glass or reflective surfaces during the long exposure. or even off dust or smoke. Try the same shot with the LED's off to prove or disprove this.



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