Napioa - Wind Origins

Napioa - Wind Origins
by octopus                

Submit your Photo
Hall of Fame

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

New answers tagged

1

In order to determine the longest shutter time you can use without getting star trails you must calculate the angle of view (AoV) your images have with the setup you are using. With a camera attached to a telescope there are several variables that will affect the angle of view shown in the resulting images. This is a little difficult to calculate because ...


0

If, by chance, you want this to be done during the day, the trick is to find the appropriate shutter speed for the situation. One that will allow the subjects to blur but remain visible while he is as sharp as needed. I've done this a good number of times at bicycle races. This was shot at 1/80th f 11 is0 200 focal length 32 mm on FF Nikon D700 24-70 ...


2

Unlike many older manual lenses, especially primes, that have a hard stop at a lens' infinity focus setting, most autofocus lenses do not. Instead they allow for the focus mechanism to be turned past infinity. There are several reasons why this is so, but the main one is to avoid the focus motor slamming against a hard stop when focusing the lens at ...


2

15 second exposure with a 18mm lense with the focus cranked all the way back When you say "cranked all the way back" it sounds like you just turned the focus ring to the far limit. That's not the right way to focus at infinity because the focus adjustment for most lenses goes past infinity. You need to focus either with autofocus, or by looking through ...


2

This is caused by the camera performing a so-called "long exposure noise reduction", which means that after the exposure a dark frame exposure of the same duration is made and then the two images are subtracted. You can opt to shut off long exposure noise reduction and instead take only a few dark frame exposures yourself.


2

Your brother will be moving during the exposure no matter how hard he tries not to. You need to use flash to illuminate him separately - doesn't have to be rear curtain sync, front will work just as well, just not an automatic exposure that'll force it to 1/60s. That will create two exposures in the same frame - flash power, aperture and ISO for your ...


3

Your premise is wrong, because actually both your subjects are blurry: the cars and your brother. The difference is for which it is desireable. To make only your brother in the foreground appear sharp, use a flash. Use second curtain sync to override the blurry long exposure of your brother with the light of the flash at the end of the exposure. To limit ...


13

If the camera is on a tripod, and we assume little or no camera movement, then there are two possibilities. Most likely, at 3", your brother is not going to stay perfectly still and there will be some subject movement. You could fix that in part by using flash during the exposure to freeze the foreground subject. And also, it's presumably fairly dark, ...


8

The issue that you are having is that your brother may appear to be still for the 3 seconds of your shutter speed but even breathing can impact the photo from being sharp. He is still moving even though it doesn't look like it. A solution I found with doing a photo like this is to have a flash set to second curtain and hit him with the flash; it should put ...


1

Wait for the sun to go down...or at least lower in the sky. You need less light so you can decrease the shutter speed, assuming you've already reduced your ISO and closed down your aperture.


0

This is not a true answer, but an expansion on calculating diffraction patterns from @whuber's answer. First, we have the diffraction integral. The function Up describes the complex amplitude in the observation plane at a distance (xp, yp) from the optical axis, and a distance Lz from the source (some kind of diffractive object, e.g. pinhole, camera ...


0

How can I still take those pictures without a grey filter One option is to try to DIY a neutral density filter. You won't get the best quality, of course, but you can get some useful ND-like effect by stretching a piece of Mylar film over your lens and securing it with a rubber band or two. Stretch it tight so that there are no wrinkles. If you need a ...


0

You can limit the amount of light received by moving a black sock, piece of dark cardboard etc. in front of the lens. If you have a 10 second exposure and repeatedly cover the lens for a total of 8 seconds during this time, the net exposure will be 2 seconds, but the blur effect in the image will be something between a 2 second and a 10 second exposure ...


18

You can merge multiple short exposure photos into a single long exposure image. There are a lot of tutorials on the net, for example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nAuQWfS3pLg Basically, he opens the sequence of photos in photoshop as layers in a single picture, then "auto-align layers", "convert to smart object" and "stack mode" - "mean". Image ...


0

Here is an example and personally, I love the effect. It can add a bit of artistry to the photo as in the one I will link to. The cause is due to the aperture blades on my nifty 50mm. Exposure is a secondary to the stars because I have to close the aperture in order to not overexpose the photos with all the bright lights I am shooting into. If I ...


9

Assuming you're doing the obvious - setting ISO to the minimum and using the smallest aperture you can - then there's nothing else you can do without an ND filter. They're not that expensive :-)



Top 50 recent answers are included