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by Aditya

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1

The brightness of trails is controlled by the flux of light hitting the sensor and its sensitivity. So, you can either increase ISO or open up the aperture or both. In any case, remember that each one has another impact: Opening your aperture decreased depth-of-field; increasing ISO adds noise. When you use an ND filter you are reducing the imprint of light ...


0

I'm not quite sure what you want to do with the street lights but number 2 is your best bet if you want the impact of the car's head lights to be better. The below image was only a 20 second exposure: Below image is with 30 seconds: Notice how there isn't much light from the headlights? This is because I only got about 2 or 3 cars in the image. Again, ...


1

The solution to #3 is to find a location without those horrid Sodium Vapor Lamps, preferably one with no street lights at all. Then you can take much longer exposures and you don't need to worry about # 1 and #2. And you will have light at wavelengths other than a narrow band around 2700°K. On a night with a moon in its second quarter (which means it is ...


0

You could try to deal with the street lamp lights in post processing. The lamps don't move and radiate at constant intensity, so the information contained in the picture due to the street lamps is not so difficult to extract. You can take a picture with a short exposure time when there are no cars to get the pure street lamp contribution. If you then do a ...


3

To achieve what you describe requires 3 separate exposures - these can all be achieved within the same frame with due care. To get a clear but ghostly image the ghost either needs to remain in one place for part of the exposure or be flash-lit at the point where it needs to be clear. To get a blurred moving ghosts image the ghost needs to move through the ...


1

It depends on whether you want the ghost to appear as if it's moving or is still. If you want it to look like it's moving then use long exposure & let the ghost move and use a flash on the normal person so they would get propper exposure. If you want the ghost to appear as if it's just standing there then you can either have soft edges & ghostly ...


0

This is two exposures combined. Both the "ghost" walking across the street and the "ghost" sitting on the bench are the same person in different costuming. larger size If you want one person to be a "non-ghost", they would need to sit perfectly still in the same pose for both exposures. In this one the "ghost" behind the bar was in only one exposure of ...


1

I'd suggest combining a long exposure with flash/strobe if you have access to it. This will give you a sharp exposure of the non-ghostly subject. You'll still need to get them to sit still but the result will be much sharper than just using ambient light. Alternatively if your camera supports it you might be able to double expose a frame. A long exposure ...


2

Why do light sources appear as stars sometimes? Taking a night shot with light sources involved, the sensor goes nearly always into saturation. This is because the dynamic range of the motif is much larger than the one of the camera. People are normally interested in the "illuminated darkness" rather than in the light sources. From the photographer's ...


2

Exactly as you say, a long exposure will do the trick... You should use a filter if you are shooting at daytime, otherwise you will perhaps need to compensate the exposure in postprocessing... Your subject (the real one) needs to be very steady so it is sharp while the ghost who is moving will be blurred... Good luck! P.S.: tripod is a must!


0

During a bright day the players may come out dark against a light sky/background. A couple of things you can try: Set your camera to overexpose a little. Set your camera to spot metering or center-weighted average metering. This way it will measure light more close around the subject. Increase exposure in post processing.


0

D90s shoot a half a stop to a stop dark for my taste and that of many others. I use the auto setting, look at the exposure through the viewfinder then switch to shutter mode and use the shutter speed I need and set the aperture to match plus open a stop or even 2. I also use an old Luna Pro incident light meter and just go by it or use rules of thumb about ...


0

Without more info on what settings you are currently using, it is hard to know for sure, but you can try the following: increase iso increase aperture (use low f numbers) at the cost of field depth lower speed, but for sport event you might want this one to be fast to prevent blur. Edit from Michael comment: typically between 1/250 to 1/1000s shutter ...


1

I believe that you will find the answer to your questions under http://www.stfmc.de/misc/diffcontrarefl/tlf.html


6

This would seem to be this acknowledged bug in GIMP; that bug has itself has been closed as a duplicate of this bug, which has been fixed in the development ("master") builds of GIMP by a complete rewrite of the metadata handling. The question I'd more be asking here is why Partha's rebuild mentioned in MBraedley's answer fixes the problem, rather than why ...


3

This recompiled/repacked version of Gimp by Partha allows me to open the files without a problem. The "Edit with GIMP" context menu item doesn't work 100% out of the box, and the interface theme is different by default, but does include a bunch of useful plugins not distributed with stock Gimp. Still don't know why the stock version of Gimp won't handle ...


1

Taking a look at page 78 of the manual as far as I can tell your camera does not have any option to extend beyond 8 seconds in camera. I also don't see an option for a remote control or shutter release that would give that ability. You could(and should) stack multiple 8 second exposures in post processing though. Take a look at this existing question: How ...



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