Red and Blue

by Gordon

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2

I'll assume that you are talking about very low light scenes with exposure times of typically say 5 seconds plus. If not, please advise. If that is a Vibration Correction (VC) lens the VC feature should be turned OFF when on a tripod. The VC feature tries to "correct" vibration that ideally is not there and makes extra vibration! Do not touch the camera ...


1

I presume by "night photography" that you mean starts etc.? It's important to set your camera focus manually and to infinity ∞ to take pictures of the night sky. Another important matter is that if you was to take the picture on a long exposure using the shutter button that you would move the camera slightly. If you're not already doing so, you should use a ...


0

I am quite happy! After doing some other tests at home (no wind, solid wood floor), I've found that the following settings enabled me to get sharp pictures with Haida filter when zooming at 100% :-) Set the VR Switch to OFF when on tripod. When set to ON, some blur could be seen. Keep Auto Focus ON but set the AF-S Priority Selection option to RELEASE, so ...


1

When doing long exposures, you usually stop down to a small aperture to be able to lengthen the exposure. If you were at f/16 or f/22 you can get blur due to the diffraction limit of your lens. If you look at twigs in the background, you can see they look almost double. Unless there is some sort of internal reflection due to the filter, it looks like ...


0

Camera markings are merely nominal numbers for us dumb humans. The concept of fstops being 2x the previous requires that shutter speeds simply must be 1,2,4,8,16,32 seconds. Or 1/ those same values. In the same way, what we call f/11 is actually f/11.31. The camera knows this, and does the right thing. But this means that to use the marked 30 seconds ...


2

I've encountered the same issue with my D7000. To get more than 100 I have to intervene just before it hits the 100 mark. When doing star trails I set the mode to Continuous Low and lock the shutter button down with the corded remote. Just before 50 minutes are up I come back to the camera and release the shutter button. When the 30 second exposure is ...


5

The reason people recommend mirror lockup for exposures lasting several seconds is because they don't know any better. Mirror lockup is most effective when the shutter speed is in the range of about 1/100 second down to around one second. Any shorter and the second curtain is closed before the vibration from the mirror reaches the parts that count: the lens ...


1

Mirror lockup is advised in long exposure to avoid the vibration at the beginning of the exposure. This is what happens when you press the shutter: 1- Mirror goes up 2- Shutter opens 3- Sensor/Film is exposed 4- Shutter closes 5- Mirror goes down As you can see from the sequence 4 & 5 the mirror lockup won't have any effect after the shutter closes and ...


2

The pictures which you see on the "model portfolio photographer" website feature exactly the types of shots you are seeking to create. They were photographed by me, using a very simple technique, in all different conditions. Camera must be tripod mounted. Use ND filters if conditions are bright- work on the sweet-spot aperture of your lens, with shutter ...


10

Take multiple photos, including the background without the subject present. Expose differently to fit each element. Combine in Photoshop. You can also spend more time playing with different settings when the foreground subject is not present, without worrying about keeping her interested. With a tripod and near-perfect alignment, blending layers is easy. ...


25

Use the ambient light to illuminate the waterfall. Use a fairly powerful flash to illuminate your human subject. The quick duration of the flash will freeze her, especially if she remains fairly still over the long exposure. The narrow aperture you will need to properly expose with the flash will also give better depth of field so that the water fall is also ...


0

I recently picked up an SLR Zoom with the ball head to use with my Canon T5i for taking macro photos outside. It's not perfect, and it can get pretty finicky for stability if you have the camera too much off level. It's good in a pinch (and infinitely better than hand-holding for macro work), but using either a long timer or a remote becomes critical, and ...


0

No it isn't I returned one I'd ordered to use with a Canon EOS 40D. It couldn't support this even with the fairly lightweight 50mm f1.8 lens. It would be worth investigating the Gorillapod Focus, which is designed for heavier cameras. I'm going to get one to try it out, but haven't got round to it yet


4

Unfortunately, no. While a Gorillapod is highly practical, and I have the SLR-Zoom too, it is weakest for long lenses because it is very sensitive to an off-center center-of-gravity. When a lens extends out much from the camera body, Gorillapod becomes unstable.



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