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24

Darktable is starting to look quite impressive http://www.darktable.org/


22

I use digikam which is developed for KDE and has ports to Windows and Mac OS X. It's one of the more powerful packages I've tried, with good folder and tag management workflows, though it's not always the most intuitive. It has lots of plugins for different websites, so you upload your photos to sites like facebook and flick with a single menu option. It ...


21

Raw Therapee is getting to be quite nice, and was recently made open source. I've had success with building it myself, or just using the precompiled Windows version under WINE (with a bit of a slow down, but not bad). Raw Therapee is making its way into most popular distributions and can be installed via the system package manager. Be sure to check for it ...


21

As far as I know, the best bet for Linux is Darktable. Workflow management with raw and JPEG editing all in one. Some teaser images from their screenshot site:


17

ColorHug is the Best Answer Linux developer Richard Hughes has designed and sells an open source colorimeter called the ColorHug. If you are running Linux, and don't have other hardware available already, this is simple, cheap, and fast. (In fact, it's about 50× faster than the old GretagMacbeth I was using before.) The current price is £60 plus shipping ...


14

GIMP and Photoshop aren't really designed for post-processing per-se. They're both excellent image editors. Ideally what you want to define is a workflow. A workflow goes something like this: Import photos from camera Tag, assign metadata and organize your photos "Process" raw images, using exposure, contrast, saturation etc controls If necessary, use ...


12

You will Never Regret moving to Lightroom or Aperture I'm sorry that neither of these run on linux, (Aperture is mac only). However, I moved from Picasa to Lightroom about 18 months ago, and I haven't looked back. Now I can do so many things with such precision and ease that it's a whole new world! I rave about Lightroom to my friends whenever this ...


11

Bibble Pro is a cross-platform program similar to Lightroom and Aperture. Great program, great plugins, great performance. As of early 2012, the product is discontinued, as the entire company was bought by Corel. Corel has announced a new program, AfterShot Pro, which is "based on Bibble's technologies", and which is also available for Linux, Mac, and ...


10

If you are looking for something closer in spirit to Aperture or Lightroom, consider Darktable. Open source, all that. http://www.darktable.org/ Its not as polished as Aperture or Lightroom, but it works, and is free. It has an active development group, and it gets better all the time.


9

I use digikam - it supports 300 RAW formats. You can see previews in the organise mode and edit RAW photos with the built in editor. The editor supports 16 bit colour depth and has enough features to support most amateurs. I think Raw Therapee might be a little better technically as a stand alone editor, but if you're not a pixel peeker then digikam makes ...


9

In Linux I use Bibble, which is has some warts but which is the only serious option AFAICT. It's $99 for the Lite version and $199 for the Pro version, and you can download a free trial and check it out. The results look great. One reason you might be confused by Picasa is that the controls try to be "magic" and hide what is actually going on. In raw ...


9

The issue you're going to have is two-fold. The X10's EXR sensor is not something other cameras have, save for a couple of Fuji cameras. The EXR sensor can do a lot of things with the available pixels in the sensor and that is why their RAW files are a little odd compared to those of say the X-Pro1 or 100 which use the X-Trans sensors. You'll potentially ...


8

DCRaw is the de facto standard for dealing with RAW photos on Linux -- in fact, DCRaw is the basis for the RAW handling in some commercial applications


8

heads-up, this is not a complete answer; it might help you get to the solution though Your linux environment is perfect of Phil Harvey's ExifTool The stand alone tool might have a way to be scripted to do this. One dirty trick is to use timestamps and bracket bias data to collect images. There is a Perl library too. Also see webhdrtools which is based ...


8

I would look into hacking a GoPro camera/camcorder to use a continuous power source. The GoPro is very well suited to harsh environments, and already comes with a housing that could be utilized. Further, it is very reasonably priced. If you are serious about low light ability, the newest Hero3 Black Edition claims 2x better low light ability then the ...


8

How does one delete rejected photos from within Darktable Use 'Delete' button (Lightroom mode, right panel, 'Selected Image(s)' module): it "physically deletes" selected images from disk. It helps to display only previously rejected images by setting 'View' filter (Lightroom mode, top panel) to 'rejected only'. For faster use, you can associate a ...


7

There is UFRaw, which is based on dcraw and can be integrated with GIMP.


7

If you're not averse to a commercial product, you might want to have a look at Bibble Pro. I used it very regularly when Linux was my primary OS and I found it to be the best digital asset management package available for that platform. It supports cataloguing, non-destructive adjustments, layers and there is a long list of plug-ins that do some very cool ...


7

I find that a combination of different software works best. I use: Geeqie for browsing thumbnails and previewing files. It has insanely rapid fast previewing of image files, including RAW, to quickly skip through see which ones are in focus/have other issues and delete them. It's also great at previewing all types of image files. Rawtherapee for all RAW ...


7

Hugin and panotools can be used to make HDR images. Here is a nice tutorial from Edu Perez And here is a tutorial from the panotools wiki I can't answer the comparison part of your question because I have not made those comparisons.


7

I prefer contrast/exposure blending to “real” HDR. It gives similar effect without sacrificing the natural look of the image. Use enfuse to run it from the command line. Hugin can run it too. digiKam has a plugin for exposure blending. See Exposure blending with digiKam.


7

The answer is: yes — color management must be enabled in both places, and the profile must be loaded in each application. The system-wide profile does two things: Loads the Video LUT at login. This look-up-table includes color temperature and gamma correction, but that's it. (This is via gcm-apply) Provides a way (using colord, on modern systems) for ...


6

UFRaw also provides a batch processing command - just open the first image, apply your settings, then save those with the option "Create ID File" set to "only". Then you can use ufraw-batch to apply the settings from this .ufraw file to your images.


6

May I suggest RawStudio? It has support for batch operations of the type you're asking for, and has dramatically simplified my post-processing workflow over my old approach of ufraw + GIMP. If you're familiar with similar "workflow" products on other platforms, the UI should feel pretty comfortable.


6

Geeqie is a great viewer of RAW (and all other) file types. It can thumb through your images at lightning speed, allowing you to delete the blurry ones quickly. While many RAW viewers take 2 to 5 seconds to display each RAW image, Geeqie is basically instant (probably around 0.15 seconds). Another neat feature of Geeqie is you can set it to retain the ...


6

Google Picasa is available for Linux download page. I've had limited success in getting digikam working on Ubuntu.


6

DigiKam On Linux (and with some effort on Windows), you can organize your workflow with digiKam. It is an advanced photo organizer, with 16-bit color depth support, color profiles, its own RAW processor, lens correction tool and a simple editor suitable for many tasks. You can invoke external tools too (I still invoke Gimp and UFRaw sometimes, when I need ...


6

The only one comparable which I have tried is Bibble Pro. The product has since been bought by Corel which now produces AfterShot Pro from the same technology. Overall, I found Bibble Pro to perform extremely well. They claimed 10X times faster than Lightroom and my measurements were close to that. The filtering and search was very intuivie and powerful ...


6

Fuji X10 is supported by dcraw. Maybe UFRaw will support that one too, thought it does not contain the camera on supported cameras list. UFRaw uses dcraw as its backend.


6

So I've decided to do the following: I'm going to buy a used Nikon D40 kit with the 18-55 lens off of eBay for about $200. To power it I'm going to use a $9 Nikon EP-5 power supply connector and a 18W 12v to 9v buck converter I found for $4. For communications, I'm going to try a $7 10m USB 2.0 Active Extension / Repeater Cable. I'm going to modify a PVC ...



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