Nidelva river through Trondheim Norway

Nidelva river through Trondheim Norway
by Saaru Lindestokke                

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0

Sure you can undo the changes. There are a few possibilities. The basic concept is that Lightroom (and other Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop or Elements) does Lossless edits. I am not saying Photoshop or Elements does lossless edits, I am saying that Adobe Camera Raw in those programs do... This means that your original image (JPG or raw) is never modified, ...


0

As your picture doesn't contain an XMP information, it'd be difficult to restore its original shape. (If this is just a JPEG file and not an export from the Photoshop native format, it'd be impossible to restore it even with the records what's happened as some changes /e.g. the green hue/ are most probably irreversible.) Have you searched the Recycle Bin ...


2

Allright, so here's the good workaround. There's no way to find b&w photos, but you can make a "smart collection". And there is choice for colorspace. I had to choose "grayscale" for tiff files and "Linear Raw" for dng files. See settings of my fiter: And voila! all and only b&w files you see!


2

If you're photos are on a network drive then the speed you can access them is determined directly by the network. All you can do is get a faster network speed, or keep the photos you want to work with on your local machine while you edit them. Then move them back when you are done.


4

This is answered right in the Adobe Photoshop Lightroom documentation on importing files: Lightroom determines a photo is a duplicate of another file in the catalog if it has the same, original filename; the same Exif capture date and time; and the same file size.


0

There's a Mac program called Deep by Ironic Software that will search for colors. It can't find just BW per se, but if you were to select grayscale values it would tend to find images with a lot of grayscale and rank them, so it might get you started. It can do Mac OS tags but can only read keywords, so you might have to do some stuff to get the BW info back ...


0

I don't know how to do it with Lightroom, but the dead Picasa will help with its Filter By Colors feature. Once installed and your images added to Picasa, go to the search bar and tape color:gray. (image from http://www.addictivetips.com/windows-tips/12-features-of-picasa-that-you-probably-dont-know-about/) Now you can tag all the matching images for ...


-1

LightRoom does no 'own processing' unless it is told to do so, maybe by import templates. When you are importing, check which template/profile you apply during the import; and try importing without any profile/settings. If you say 'the colors are dramatically off', it sounds like the temperature sliders was moved and the result stored in the import ...


2

Once you have the circles in your shots, the damage is done. The stronger light in the ring-form has overwritten some information that you would like to see there, and just because human brains suggest that it is still there below the rings, it isn't. It is overwritten and gone. What you can do, with appropriately qualified software, is manually 'heal', ...


3

There is nice third-party add-on from Google called Nik. It was paid but they released it free. It cooperates nicely with Photoshop and Lightroom. Black and White: https://www.google.com/nikcollection/products/silver-efex-pro/ Color: https://www.google.com/nikcollection/products/color-efex-pro/ There are several film presets as well as possibility to do ...


1

Get a ColorChecker Passport and use it to create accurate profiles for Lightroom for the specific camera+lens combo and the current lightning conditions. While this doesn't guarantee that the images will look like the JPEGs generated by the camera, it does makes them look more accurate, perhaps even more pleasing than the JPEGs.


3

One thing I don't fully understand is why, when I take a photo with a Nikon and import it in Lightroom, the colors immediately appear desaturated and visibly different than what it looked like in the camera. This is just a different interpretation of the raw data. Lightroom can't read the preset information from Nikon files, it seems and applies some ...


5

That Adobe seems to butcher the colors of all my raws drives me nuts You are wrong here. What you see on the back of your camera is not the raw file, but the JPEG preview, which includes whatever setting you dial in your camera. That includes contrast and boost of saturation. LR cannot reproduce the same look from the raw file, because the process is ...


2

We already have quite a few answers on this topic, so you should do some reading at least here: Is there a general formula for image size vs. print size? What is a suitable image resolution for canvas prints? The short of it is that you should not resize anything on your side. Let the printer do that for you. Send them the largest image you have before ...


0

Lr is up to 2015.5.1. http://blogs.adobe.com/lightroomjournal/2016/04/lightroom-cc-2015-5-1-now-available.html. Not sure if that matters, but I seem to recall one update had something about tethering.


0

Different monitors use different phosphors with different colour gamuts. Same brand/model monitors have production variations. The same monitor will have different colour gamut with different time-to-warm-up and time-in-use. Another long-shot would be to check the colour depth as 16 bit to 32 bit conversions can further affect results. If you are using ...


5

Interestingly, I also found the same blog when starting out with Lightroom. There are many ways to get images organized and I found have a file-system structure is very helpful. First is that the filesystem structure is accessible without Lightroom to every other program. You can use it to quickly located images without having to load Lightroom and wait for ...


1

Just think of the future when Lightroom may not exist anymore : your collections would be useless. Whereas your folders will still exist. And you may need them to import your collections in the next trendy software. Moreover, if you want to upload your pictures, you will use the regular files manager and it will be more efficient to have properly named ...


0

The way around the limit is to export the image and apply correction to it again. You can do this any number of times to reach 200 or 1000 or more cummalatively. If you use a lossless format such TIFF or DNG (Not sure how Lightroom stores PSDs, most likely that too is lossless) then there should not be any artifacts due to multiple cycles of processing. ...


1

This has been a known problem in Lightroom for over 2 years, with no response from Adobe. I'm not sure what the precision is, but if you're too close to a standard aspect ratio it just uses the standard ratio. I needed to do a 13x10 crop and LR refused to store it as a custom ratio, always choosing 8½x11 instead. Curiously, 8½x11 is ...


0

Where are the synonyms being stored in the exported images? In general on export Lr is gonna write all the keywords and synonyms into a flat list. IPTC provides for keywords, and that's it. Keyword hierarchies are actually stored elsewhere in the XMP metadata, and not all applications can even read them. I'd wanna look at the XMP in the exported file, but ...



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