Spring 2012

Spring 2012
by ani

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0

Writing changes to the files, whether sidecar or directly into the images (dng or jpeg) has a significant impact on performance when you apply changes to a lot of images at once. Just try to add a tag to 10000 images in one go, your hard disk will start working for quite a while. Writing to the image instead of a sidecar file just exacerbates the ...


0

Assuming you keep your raw files in your camera's native format (e.g. .nef, .cr2, etc.) the sidecars can lengthen the file each time more data is written to them. Under certain conditions this can lead to fragmentation when many files were written sequentially when imported. On the other hand, if you write the data directly to a DNG file (that you created ...


3

feels wrong to clog up my folders with thousands of xmp files that I'll probably never use You say "Lightroom CC," by which I assume you also have Photoshop. Every time you say "Edit in Photoshop," you use the XMP data. Photoshop loads it when it loads the photo, and then saves it back out when you save the edited photo. When you tell Lightroom to "Edit ...


2

So, are there any downsides to activating this option? Some people apparently experience minor performance impact when the data is written to the disk. I see no difference on an SSD. Obviously, you will have your folders littered with XMP files with Adobe specific data and questionable usefulness outside of LR/ACR.


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Thanks Rafal, Checking the box for Treat JPEG as separate does the trick. There's one more thing/step (and I wish Adobe would make this an Automatic thing), and that is to Stack the JPEGs & RAWs. Select All > Photo > Stacking > Auto > Auto-stack by exposure time > set Time between Stack to 0:00:01 or 0:00:02 [I used 0:00:02 (vs. :01) because I ...


1

The issue is likely with Lightroom, which has seen significant slowdowns in import function. Adobe announced that v6.3/CC 2015.3 has been released to resolve these issues, by basically returning to its older import code.


0

I screwed up and moved my catalog without having the XMP data backed up. Was at a loss for answers but stumbled across this free Lightroom add-on that rips adjustments from JPEG files. Thankfully, I had exported my images to JPEG to post to a website. So I only had to load each photo and rip the data for each one. It doesn't reset your rotations or crops, ...


1

You're using the wrong tool to get what you want. The distortion settings in Lightroom are assuming you're using a physical lens, not a virtual one, like you do when shooting a panorama. You've basically blown past the limits of that that setting is meant to do. What you need is a more sophisticated panorama stitching program that allows for different ...


2

You can try to speed things up with smart previews. They are essentially smaller compressed raw files, which LR can work with even if the original files are unavailable. These files are significantly smaller than the original files, which could allow you to place them on a local drive, which has quicker access than a network drive. If you can get the smart ...


0

Sure you can undo the changes. There are a few possibilities. The basic concept is that Lightroom (and other Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop or Elements) does Lossless edits. I am not saying Photoshop or Elements does lossless edits, I am saying that Adobe Camera Raw in those programs do... This means that your original image (JPG or raw) is never modified, ...


0

As your picture doesn't contain an XMP information, it'd be difficult to restore its original shape. (If this is just a JPEG file and not an export from the Photoshop native format, it'd be impossible to restore it even with the records what's happened as some changes /e.g. the green hue/ are most probably irreversible.) Have you searched the Recycle Bin ...


4

Allright, so here's the good workaround. There's no way to find b&w photos, but you can make a "smart collection". And there is choice for colorspace. I had to choose "grayscale" for tiff files and "Linear Raw" for dng files. See settings of my fiter: And voila! all and only b&w files you see!


3

If your photos are on a network drive then the speed you can access them is determined directly by the network. All you can do is get a faster network speed, or keep the photos you want to work with on your local machine while you edit them. Then move them back when you are done.



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