Butterfly

by Rodrigo

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2

You are asking more then one thing here. Why doesn't the Print module have an option to save as TIFF Why does the print module exist What advantages does TIFF have over JPEG Answers below: It is anybody's guess who isn't on the development team, but it has been requested as a feature to add in the future(here and here). Its main advantages are to ...


1

I've poked into this a bit in the past, and you won't like the answer much. Publish services, because they interact with so many parts of Lightroom and with code blocks installed as plug-ins, are complicated beasts. Adobe's chosen to store their configuration information in the preferences file, not in a preset file. The preferences file for Lightroom 5 ...


0

This is probably a good place to start: Preference and other file locations | Lightroom 3.x. I would have thought that publish services have their own folder and associated files similar to export presets that I am familiar with(\Adobe\Lightroom\Export Actions), but it appears as though at least some of the Publish Services data is actually located within ...


1

Stack by time : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IJn4BoqQPkY http://lightroomkillertips.com/10-things-aperture-users-need-to-know-about-lightroom/ You can sort by date and then create a smart collection ....


3

This online calculator calls this "Mach Absolute Time" (couldn't find a lot info about this) and can convert your value to a standard representation, which gives UTC / GMT: 25.12.2011 13:53:58, just for the integer portion, though. This SO answer explains that this is unix with a different base, convert by adding 978307200 (2001-1970) EDIT: oh, be aware ...


4

The spot removal tool is what you want, you can either click to heal spots or drag for things like hairs.


7

Here's a solution using python and opencv: This will crop all the faces it finds in the jpeg photos in whatever folder you run it in, with the padding specified by the left, right, top, bottom variables: import cv2 import sys import glob cascPath = "haarcascade_frontalface_default.xml" # Create the haar cascade faceCascade = ...


0

You have to look for some Raw Image Repair Software. Although there are many recovery software available online, but most of them cannot repair from RAW files. Also do not use that memory card further until repair process is complete.


1

I was able to reproduce the undesired behaviour in LR5. It happens when the layout style (top most category) "Picture Package" is selected. Whatever you do, all boxes of one page are filled with the same image. I think the point of this layout style is exactly that: create a layout with different sized boxes to get one image printed at all those sizes. To ...


0

I was trying to do this the other day for printing some photos for someone. I couldn't work out how to do it. I went to Photoshop because I used to be able to do a contact sheet there, but since CS4 I think it has been added as a feature in Adobe Bridge instead. In Bridge, I think you go into Output mode, and should see options on the right hand side. Here ...


0

The photograph seem to have a good dynamic range, it seem like shot in the golden hour (minutes?) with nice exposure settings as Olin Lathrop wrote. For a shooting timetable you can search about "Goldern Hour Calculator", these would give you schedules which would be relevant to your position on earth. If you own a smartphone, there are many handy free apps ...


1

I am sure you know this, but for future readers, I should note that if you save only the JPEG, you lose nearly all capability to reprocess later. This is equivalent (in the film days) of keeping the print, but throwing away the negative. Recall that Lightroom does not 'import' your photos, it imports that data from your images. So its not actually copying ...


0

Basically, you're trying to screw in a light bulb with a hammer. Lightroom isn't designed to work that way and I don't know of any way to convince it to do that, nor do I think it'd be a good idea to try. You'll be much happier in the long run if you learn how Lightroom wants to do things and adopt some form of that processing setup. If that's what you ...


0

This really runs quite contrary to the natural order of Lightroom in that Lightroom wants to be an ongoing repository for your photos. It actually sounds like you'd benefit from a way to script Adobe Camera Raw functionality - here's a thread that touches on what capabilities exist in this area. In addition, if you've got Photoshop, it appears that ...


0

I use a lot of place specific filters in smart collections. When you geotag your photos (preferably, in an automatic way when you capture it) creating collections based on location is simple. You can divide by country, or city and other options. Perfect for trips and such.


1

The best approach I can think of for this is to use keywords. The advantage would be that when you do that and switch to smart collections, you could then star using AND and OR logic to combine or exclude images automatically. I'm not entirely sure I see why you think switching to Smart Collections would be an improvement, but I think it would allow you to ...


3

It shouldn't make any difference, they are both tools created by Adobe with the same processing engine behind them. As long as the versions of camera raw are in sync, its the same thing. Use whichever one suits your workflow the best. If you spend most of your time working a single image at a time and in PS, then stick with that. If you edit thousands of ...


0

The first example looks like it was shot on a film, possibly a portrait type negative. You could try some film presets to replicate it. If that does not do the trick, try adding KR or Skylight filter effect. I don't see anything notable on the second picture, except the shallow depth of field and limited color scale given by the subject and the background. ...


0

There aren't any tricks here, Lightroom or otherwise. Take a photo of a colorful subject in reasonably bright lighting, and you're done. In the first image, of a woman in front of a colorful shell castle, it's possible that there is a light curves adjustment to bring out what would otherwise be shadows on the models' face. (It's also possible that there is ...


4

The softness is not a Lightroom settings change. It is restricted depth of field, created by opening up the lens' aperture to various degrees. The strength of this effect appears (!) greater in your second example. To see if you can create it with a typical cheap kit lens, I tried to replicate that sort of scene here, using a 28-105mm f/3.5 lens racked out ...


1

It seems like these photo's are pretty well balanced. However the whites are a bit increased and the vibrance is a little higher than standard. If necessary you could also lower the clarity a bit to soften the image and turn up the highlights to get the high contrast/whites.


1

A camera profile may consist of several operators, including: A linear transform (a matrix) from the camera RAW color space to CIE XYZ color space (used to compute the conversion transform to ProPhoto RGB, which is the working color space of Lightroom). An HSV lookup table - Similar to the HSL function in Lightroom, but provides much more control on the ...



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