Serene Life

by garik

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24

Here is how I usually approach the subject: I attach a remote cable release to the camera and set the camera to manual mode, and make a first guess on exposure (for instance 15 sec, f/11, ISO 100 or 200). Then I shoot a test frame and check the resulting image. I aim to make an exposure where the landscape looks like I want it to look in the lightning ...


15

It is pretty similar to photographing fireworks (if it is relatively dark out or you have tons of ND filters): Use a tripod. Set aperture and ISO exposure for daylight. Use bulb mode, open the shuter and wait for a lightning flash, then close the shutter (a remote is useful). Use RAW, it it will give you a lot of headroom in case you want to increase ...


11

Stable tripod, stop down your aperture, lower ISO, use ND filters if needed, switch off "long exposure noise reduction" otherwise you send half of the time exposing dark frames. Disable automatics that are too smart or keep the time between shots long. The main concept when photographing such unpredictable things is to keep the shutter open as much of the ...


5

If a Canon P&S camera, you can install CHDK and install one of the scripts to trigger the shutter when the lightning goes. (Since P&S have an electronic shutter, the sensor can be activated without taking a picture. The script does this and watches for a changed image, then captures a photo when it detects lightning.) Believe it or not, it's fast ...


5

This is caused by the lightning illuminating the sky very briefly as the photograph is captured. The image on digital cameras is not recorded on the whole sensor at the same time, but instead it scans across the sensor, usually (as in this case) parallel to the shorter edge. It is particularly pronounced on camera phones as the scanning speed is slower than ...


4

To answer some questions about how CHDK does its thing: After CHDK has been installed and is running on a CHDK-capable camera, then a script is loaded from your SD card (in the scripts folder on the card) to make use of the motion-detection feature of CHDK programming. This lightning script was optimized for fastest response times. If you look at the camera ...


3

According to the manual for the Sony Cyber-shot DSC-W80- currently the highest-end model in the Cyber-shot lineup which has a 7.2mp sensor- there is no direct way to adjust the exposure length (e.g. the shutter speed and aperture) on this camera model. Sooo, without knowing exactly which model Cyber-shot camera you have, since the DSC-W80 (the highest-end ...


2

If you've got an itch to DIY, you can also use an arduino with a photo transistor to detect the rapid change in light and trigger the shutter. Wire up a basic circuit with a photo transistor as an arduino input. Wire up the arduino to trip your shutter cable. Write a small script to detect fast light changes. You can check out some details here. If ...


2

From my experience, the key to photographing the moon is to underexpose the image to capture details like the craters on the moon surface. At normal exposures, you'll just get a white round blob with no details whatsoever. Try these steps: Mount the camera on a tripod with the 55-200mm. Use a remote shutter release. If you don't have one, use the timer. ...


1

I would recommend PCB Einstein's with Vagabond mini power supplies, and 86" PLM's in extreme silver with a white front diffusers. If your shooting for a long bit, you may need extra batteries for the mini, but that combination will get you the light in these images at a very reasonable cost. I wouldn't recommend the ring flash unless you like that style of ...


1

Portability and those shots don't go well together. They are using a single strong key light in front that is coming from a large area (using a soft box most likely) to generate soft but dark shadows on the backdrop. They are also using a hard backlight that is strongly off to the side and almost functioning as more of a side fill. Look at the feet in the ...


1

For the moon, the ideal scenario would be: Camera on a tripod Remote shutter release Liveview focusing Longest focal length you can manage (200mm in your case) Then pick the aperture in which your lens is sharpest with the lowest ISO, and use one of the numerous online moon exposure calculators to work out your shutter speed. However, I think you're ...



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