Before the rush

Before the rush
by evan-pak

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1

Ok, here is my simple explanation. I hope this answers the question. I use TTL with 2 units. I set my "B" unit so it's 2 stops less flash than "A" unit. I set that ratio using my on camera transmitter. I would think that the "A" unit would dictate the overall exposure. As long as "A" is the correct exposure, then "B" would simply fall into place with the 2:...


0

Today medium format cameras are almost exclusively using Sony CMOS sensors which are excellent at high iso (better than what a smaller sensor Nikon, Canon or Sony can manage), generally offer leaf shutter lenses (except Pentax as the time of this writing), and have better characteristics such as out-of-focus area falloff, etc.. the aspect ratio is also ...


1

More than likely your problem is that the lights are too close. Watercolors are generally bigger than 8x10 for example. A copy stand generally has the lights too close for works bigger than a book. One bad solution is to put put a scrim or light modifier in between the light and the watercolors. It may eliminate the hot spot but create an new problems ...


2

It doesn't require buying a lot of expensive gear, but it does require buying gear. And you don't need a dSLR, you need a lighting setup. And going into studio-style lighting setups requires a bit of experience and knowledge. This might be a look you can achieve without lighting, but it's unlikely. The white background and crisp clean look are generally ...


2

A beginner level DSLR with a kit lens would be enough for this use case. Taking into consideration you're a complete beginner, you probably can just use auto-mode for this task. If you are wanting to get into photography seriously or just really need a super crisp image I would suggest buying a prime lens (maybe a 50mm).


0

As well as shutter speed you need to set white balance not use auto wb. Set your white balance to florescent if you have that setting but using a color meter to measure the kelvin temp of the lights and setting that as a custom white balance would be better.


3

The answers given by whuber and Matt Grum are correct, pointing out the flicker problem and some workarounds. My addendum comes 6 years after, where we are now beginning to see some real solutions to the lamp flicker problem: New cameras such as the Canon EOS 7D Mark II and 80D introduced an anti-flicker shooting mode. The camera uses the metering sensor ...


2

I see that a complete set should include a key, a fill, a hair and a background light. What a complete set includes is very subjective and depends a lot on the desired look. Given that this is your first set, I would shy away from buying that many units. Start with one or two and add them as necessary. You didn't buy the "complete" set of lenses for your ...


0

The main or key is set high to simulate afternoon sun. The fill is subordinate and best placed at lens height near the camera. You are filling shadows as seen from the camera's viewpoint. If main and fill are equal as to output, measure main to subject distance and multiply by 1.4. This computes fill distance that causes the fill to be subordinate by 1 f-...



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