Westminster fountain at sunset

by Jorge Córdoba

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0

The problem you are facing is that you want to take a circumstance with extremely high dynamic range (more than any digital camera sensor can handle) and make a photo with a more "normal" perceptible dynamic range. You have a few options here... Compress the dynamic range in the actual scene by adding lights. See @moorej's answer and related link to the ...


1

You, sir, are right on. What I like about your propposed setup is the simplicity, and the effectivity. You'd save space, time and money and will be able to get very, very good results. You can improve the reflactivity of your bounce difuser by choosing solid cardboard as white as possible. You can also use translucent paper with aluminum foil as a backing, ...


2

Absolutely! You're using this for a video setup, but it's common in still photography with strobes, where this technique is known as "bounce flash". The caveat is that strobes — like from studio lighting, from hotshoe flashes, or even from the popup flash of a camera — are very short intense bursts of light. Your lamp, and probably even your spotlight, ...


2

It will work after a fashion, but you'll get substantial reduction in light level when the light is reflected. In your application it may well be adequate. If you wish to use a diffuser you do not need a formal or commercial one. The paper that you intend stick on the wall could be used instead as a diffuser - it may prove too opaque, but it's easily ...


2

Sodium vapor lights lamps come in two types - there is the low pressure which is nearly yellow (589.0 nm and 589.6nm) and the high pressure which produces a more pinkish tone which has a few other elements doping it and resulting in a more 'natural' color rendition. The low pressure one is trivial to filter out with a common filter for photography, and the ...


0

Why not simply configure the white balance in your camera or in post production? Take an image of a white balance card, and simply use that to set Custom Whitebalance in your camera, or if shooting RAW, use the image of the card to set the balance across all similar shots


3

See How does the colour of ambient lighting affect colour rendition?, because that question uses a sodium vapor light as an example. As the answers there explain, sodium vapor lights produce a very, very narrow spectrum of light: CC-BY-SA image from Wikimedia Commons, author Philips Lighting And in fact, this is effectively monochrome. Your only options ...


0

Light is composed of many wavelengths even when one is predominant such as in street lighting, thus I doubt a filter will work very well. Try wrapping a black bag around the street light or finding some other way to block the light. Light painting at night relies upon overpowering the ambient light with the lighting used. So you will need to experiment with ...


1

It may be possible to get most of this effect in-camera without special equipment, it shouldn't be to difficult to try - here's my attempt at deconstructing the images: Shoot raw, we are playing with lighting and it will help if we are able to fix things in post. The pictures are outside in the sunlight, try mid morning or late afternoon, it's not golden ...


1

Two ways to do it (in Photoshop) are to: Duplicate the layer of the image you want to lighten Go to Image>>Adjustment>>Exposure. Adjust to the lightness you want... THEN duplicate that layer (Note: you know have 3 layers) Go to >>Filters>>Blur>>Gaussian Blur Adjust the Gaussian Blur to a number like say "6" Really blow it out. Hit "OK" ...


0

Some ways to achieve this kind of effect are as follows: 1) Over exposing the image slightly (tripod required) 2) Post processing using software like Photoshop Personally I would want to never overexpose an image unless shooting astrophotography as you lose the data in the raw image. This makes post production very difficult as it limits your options. ...


8

I don't know that camera, but this looks like a classic case of focal plane shutter artifacts with rapidly changing light. The output of the fluorescent tubes changes significantly over each 1/2 line cycle, which is at 120 Hz or 100 Hz depending on what part of the world you are in. At short exposure settings, only a part of the picture is exposed at any ...


1

Post processing can be useful if you only have limited control of the lighting. E.g. suppose that there are external light sources that you cannot fully eliminate. In that case you can take pictures with the desired lights on and without the lights in which case you only have the external lights. To eliminate the latter, you need to do a weighted subtraction ...


0

Depending on the dish shape and the diffuser material, it could conceivably make a perceptible difference if the light is used in very tight. "Beauty dish" refers to a whole host of different reflector styles, from the even parabolic Elinchrom to the step-sided Mola to a basic flat-bottomed, high-sided design that looks for all the world like a minimalist ...


2

When using regulable flashes or countinuous lamps, the lightmeter does not tell the photographer what aperture to use, instead it tells which aperture the current lighting is set up for. The photographer first decides what aperture to use, a suitable ISO and exposure time. The meter is then used to find a flash or lamp setting that is good for the aperture ...


2

Yes, a flashmeter only gives aperture. The shutter speed on the camera merely has to be long enough to ensure the film or sensor are uncovered for the duration of the flash (1/50 sec for a Leica M3, 1/250 for modern SLRs and up to 1/500 for a leaf shutter) and doesn't affect the exposure, assuming ambient light is insignificant compared to the flash output, ...


4

You've only got the three variables to work with -- ISO, aperture, and shutter speed. When shooting in a studio environment, shutter speed doesn't really matter because you're relying upon the lights and their limitations, so you often need to work at 1/60 sec. You input your desired ISO into the light meter, and take a reading. The only variable left is the ...


4

When we talk about flash photography; this is because the shutter speed does not contribute to the exposure from the flash. A flash will output a burst which last maybe 1/1000s, so changing the shutter speed won't affect the exposure from the flash but form the other continuous light sources. And since the light meter used in the first video you linked ...


2

You would let the light meter choose the aperture if you did not care about that choice. That's the short answer. I think you are thinking about it correctly. You need to make a choice of the aperture for DOF reasons or perhaps you care more about a specific shutter speed to capture motion (or not) the way you want. But the light meter has to tell you ...


1

I've found this flickr page which is highly interesting in term of lighting and composition... You can actually see how "DIY" are his pictures ! Hope it will help someone else ! https://www.flickr.com/photos/balakovsetup/


4

I'm looking for ways to improve my lighting and my overall composition. Tips on composition are outside of the scope of this site, as regards to lighting technique then that's bordering on too broad a question also, as the flickr account you link to contains many images with different lighting styles and techniques. Maybe you could pick out a ...


3

That's a very broad question, so it's hard to give a specific answer. A few points: Decide what you want. It's great to just mess around sometimes and see what you get, but if you want to create consistently better images, work on creating the image in your head first. If you can do that, it will be much easier to figure out how to use what you have to ...



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