Moonlight

by Jakub

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0

I think the easiest way would be to take your long exposure shot to get the night sky and fire off a single shot from a flash from inside the tent. You can experiment with the strength of flash needed, but that would probably be simpler than trying to balance a continuous light source.


4

In short You really need a tripod. After that, you will have to experiment yourself with exposition time and the lighting (diffuse) in the tent (the longer the exposition, the dimmest the light needs to be) It is easier and cheaper to experiment with light color instead of tent color. There are tons of references (blogs and videos) on how to do that on ...


0

Well, the only one who can determine the setup is you. This is becouse you don't need a technical issue like eliminationg shadows while reproducing a painting. You probably need: the texture of the paper to be noticable, or not. the wrincles of the cutout paper, or not. some shadows to make emphasis that is not computer generated, or not. a light that ...


0

Usually a polarizing filter on the lens is enough, and if it is not, you can apply Krylon Dulling Spray http://www.krylon.com/products/dulling-spray/ http://www.amazon.com/Krylon-K1310-11-Ounce-Dulling-Spray/dp/B00009R8O6 or something similar. The spray is easily removed after. Important limitation is that dulling sprays can't be applied if humidity is ...


0

I applied a radial gradient to the quick-mask in Gimp like this: ...then adjusted the black point in levels: ...with this result: There is still inconsistency, as you described, but I can't tell if it's from lighting, or discoloration on the actual plate. You could probably do better if you took the time to create a custom gradient that closely ...


0

But this is a much wider question than just which one. The real question is which type of lights. Continuous lights (light bulbs) are generally in disfavor for portrait photography, because no matter how large you get, they are small lights, not powerful for photography, and proper exposure at any decent ISO, shutter speed and aperture will be a continuous ...


3

I really don't understand well what is your experiment. There are a lot of factors to consider, for example diffraction, which varies depending on the size of the aperture for example. To "increase" the light source (optimize, actually) I would recommend a parabolic mirror. A headlight of a car could work. Another option is not to use a led light but a ...


1

It depends on what you actually need, and what you actually want. You need some combination of exposure, such that the aperture, shutter speed, and sensitivity can actually capture an image of some kind. What you want follows from this, and informs your choices. How much noise is acceptable? How much of the object needs to be lit? (i.e., is is acceptable ...


4

The easiest answer is "time". You don't need to amplify anything: you just need to collect it for longer. The overall exposure of your photo is the amount of ambient light that is accepted through the camera's aperture for the amount of time the shutter is open. Presuming that your object doesn't move, simply take either one long exposure or a sequence of ...


0

Saying it a different way, a regular reflected white umbrella (with black cover) is seen to meter 0.7 to 1.0 stops stronger than the same umbrella as shoot-through (without cover), if both are metered at same distance from the fabric. And reflected is slightly softer light too, if at same distance. (Yeah, the shoot-through can be placed closer, and you'd ...


2

You could use a fill light from a reflector or another strobe to illuminate the background a bit. Of course, that means additional setup time and expense. You could experiment with extending exposure, at least on the Canon, to reduce the brightness of the ring-light in comparison to the background (e.g. increase exposure time so that light keeps entering ...


0

I created a plywood board with 3 cheap ceiling light fixtures, each holding 2 full size florescent tubes. This, mounted vertically, I found looks just like window light and will blend with other natural light when using the sun-lamp spectrum bulbs. If you're local to me you can have it (sans bulbs).


0

If you're a Lightroom user, the latest version (6) of Lightroom now supports HDR merging of multiple exposures into a single HDR DNG. This is awesome for property shoots. I've shot a few interiors over the past weekend, and the results from LR are great, really natural looking.


4

If the place has no ceiling, bring your own. White cardboard is an obvious cheap one. Styrofoam is lightweight and holds its shape better than cardboard (depending on the thickness of your cardboard. Any "professional" reflector will make you look more professional, but at a cost. For some clients it could be bad to show up with some cardboard. "Are you ...


2

If the number of shots you're doing is limited, I'd use multiple exposures, since you can pop flash into any corners and later blend areas from different exposures into a nice result. Use a tripod and make use of the ambient light as much as possible. You can bounce flash off the walls of course, but that may not appear natural. Or you can take along a ...


-1

Why not just make your own DIY flash modifier? The simplest is a 3x5 index card rubber banded to the back of the flash. You won't get 100% of the flash on the subject, but its better than nothing. Google "DIY flash modifier' to get tons of good results. Like this, and this, and this as well.


5

Use a flash with rear curtain sync and a long shutter speed. The long shutter blurs the background and the subject. However, at the end of the exposure, the rear curtain synced flash fires, which essentially adds a second exposure on top. The flash is significantly brighter compared to the ambient light, but due to its limited reach, it only hits the ...


1

In my opinion, leadership, creativity and flexibility are not best conveyed by the backdrop color of a headshot. Note that I said headshot, as that is what I would typically recommend for any resume/CV image. Instead I think that it is important to consider your audience. Are you(or the user of the image) applying for a position as a manager in a ...


0

Unless you're trying to achieve professional-quality lighting, yes. If you are considering any kind of external lighting keep in mind that no P&S is going to properly compensate for an external strobe, so any supplemental lighting would need to be constant or you'll have a lot of blown out photos and frustrated photo-takers. If you want people to use ...


1

I've done a few booths so far, with a fixed lighting system and some on-camera flashs, and I havent had it even once where the fixed lighting was actually used. The scenery of these images change so often that you should not worry about it, from single pictures to 6+ groups you will see everything and as the day passes (and probably the more booze is ...


3

Taking polaroids at wedding receptions is nice. There are some things that you should be aware of: There's no polaroid film available any more. You can get modern film from the impossible project, but it does not develop as quickly as the original polaroid film. Waiting a long time for a polaroid image kind of defeats the point of using that technology. ...


1

Sure, some sort of "proper" lighting setup will give you better results than on camera flash... but as your friend is wanting photos of people with funny accessories on a polaroid camera, I suspect that he's not after your traditional formal portraits. Keep it simple, go with the on-camera flash and concentrate on getting fun images which capture the guests ...


4

The blue shadow is from light going through the blue-tinted transparent cover. Here are some suggestions: Put a secondary fill light where it can illuminate the background. You might position it behind the background, if that is translucent. Mount the objects on some type of hidden stand, such as one going through the backdrop, so that shadows fall ...


0

Instead of eliminating the shadows via lighting, why not try to suspend the shoe via two thin metal rods? You then take a picture of a shoe that is in mid air and there won't be any shadows near the shoe.


0

Do you want a perfect white background? Why not experiment with some form of stand that lifts the item being photographed off the white surface, allowing light to get underneath. You may have to add extra lights and of course position the stand and/or camera so the the stand is not visible.


3

More light (from more directions) might help. I've got a light tent somewhat similar to yours, though its construction is translucent on all sides, allowing me to light it from the outside. I've had decent luck illuminating the tent with speedlites on multiple sides, and in some cases, the bottom, too (I put the tent on a glass coffee table and placed a ...


1

Use opaque white acrylic glas and light id with diffused light (softbox or so) from behind/beneath. Use a dull one to avoid reflections. My example is with glossy/polished glass, not dull. That is because I did want the reflection (and because I did not have dull plate of that glass :-) ) http://fc-foto.de/27416430 Set: http://fc-foto.de/27389485


0

You might wanna look into light tables: LED or other even-lit surfaces. See here for pictures



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