Incense

by Bart Arondson

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1

You may find useful this wikipedia page You can calculate the exposure value with the given formula: EV = log2(N^2 / t) setting: N = the f-number (aperture) you will use t = the exposure time you will use they both depends on your camera: search a middle aperture for your lens and a time you will likely use (a rule of thumb is that the slower time ...


4

It's not trivial to calculate from scratch the amount of light required (as you have no idea how much is absorbed, reflected etc. and it will vary according to how the lights are positioned). What you can do, is find out what shutter speed your camera meter is suggesting currently and work it out from there. You'll want to aim for 1/2f where f is the focal ...


0

The EOS 70D only has ratio control for 2 groups, A&B, however Canon Speedlites can be triggered if those flashes are set to individual slave mode. Using the optical wireless system a slave can be set to manual mode by pressing and holding down the mode button on the flash for a few seconds. This will put the slave in manual and the group letter will not ...


0

Low key photography justs asks for a dark place, you can take a room and take all the light away. Then you need a specific light source such as a lamp to shine light onto your model. You can play with this to achieve the result you want. Make sure you have a shutter speed at about 1/250 and you have a 100 or 200 iso.


2

I am an artist and a photographer. I do have a knowledge I got from my teachers at the art school which may answer your question regarding "why left oriented lighting is preferred" Most of the artists in the history, including the academic photographers, designers, sculptors, studied nature to understand objects and light. Most of them studied pencil ...


0

The lightbulb looks overexposed, the dirt on the lightbulb which is so clearly visible in the first image is no longer visible in the final image. The whole point of HDR is to make all the details in both the extremely dark and light parts to become better visible.


0

TTL stands for Through The Lens, and in the case of SLR metering, it indicates how the light is measured--that it's the light coming through the taking lens, rather than, say, an exterior sensor. In flash metering terminology, a TTL system in the camera/flash combination typically means that the camera will tell the flahs to send out a small "preflash" ...


0

I have done very similar product shots before. You can start with 4 lights. 2 in front with big softboxes to light the subject and 2 with big diffusers to light the background. Adjust the distance and power of each of your light to taste. There is no one right way to do it.


0

One thing you can try, providing your subjects aren't ridiculously far from the camera, is to take 1-3 speed light flashes that mount on a bracket that goes on top of a light stand. Keep the lights low and sync them so they all fire at the same time. Use a large silver reflector and fire the flashes away from your subjects and onto the reflector. You could ...


0

It's possible there was some focus stacking involved to get this DOF in the purple flower.


1

The main reason why there will be reflection on such a surface will be due to light spillage and light bouncing off bright walls. my suggestion is to block this light spillage with Matt Black Cards Set up your panels; standing or flat, makes no difference, it is how you wish to display them so that you are able to show the maximum beauty of each panel. Get ...


1

I agree with @claraonager: anyone in attendance gets to be a gaffer. I just found some "nano" paracord and picked up a 300-foot spool to add to my bag, but have not used it yet. Small (half-inch) binder clips pack in a small light space, easily grab a cloth, and have a handy place to tie paracord on. Look at surplus "space blankets" for reflector ...


0

For a long shot you don't need to worry about brightening the face so much. Lighten it in post — the small feature can tolerate a little more noise. Bracket the shot so you can swap in brighter faces if necessary. When starting with digital, I remember being impressed with how that simplified fill light especially working alone.


0

With strobes, you will have a harder time figuring out how to get it right. With continuous lighting you just move things and see. With still-life you don't have to worry about exposure time (within reason), so that makes it quite practical. You might also consider sunlight. Outdoors in open shade is great and big. Include a gray target in part of the ...


0

You need a tent. I have a small table-top unit and shot perfect photos of a watch with no glare from the glass, and more recently some glass bottles that had horrible reflections (even could see myself!) Look up lighting tent so you know what I'm talking about. For your setup, get some suitable fabric and string a couple lines of paracord over the sample ...


1

It's also very possible that the outside was darkened in post. The light might be from a twin-light flash where you can aim the lights more precisely. http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/239656-USA/Canon_2357A002_MT_24EX_Macro_Twin_Lite.html


3

Do you know how the image was made? It looks to me a lot like some of the flower images created by Katinka Matson. They're gorgeous, but they're not photographs -- the flowers are arranged on a flatbed scanner and scanned. The way the light falls off quickly and uniformly around the flower looks a lot like what you see in Matson's work.


2

To hazzard a guess, I would say that the lighting was done with a twin-tube affair, with the tubes arranged above and below the lens. The upper tube was the main (more powerful) light; the lower tube was fill at about half the upper tube's power (down 1 stop, or a 1:2 ratio with the "A" tube at the top). To get the fall-off you see from front to back, the ...


0

Some time since original post, I notice, but for anyone else interested: check out the Yongnuo YN 500 EX, it's a relatively new model and from what I can tell it's quite heavily "inspired" by the 430 EX II. I have one personally and I'm very happy with it. Plenty results from a google search, here's one of them: ...


3

The 70D unfortunately doesn't support controlling group C directly. It will however fire group C flashes when set to fire ALL. (Source: The manual) The Canon optical wireless flash system still contains all three groups, it is simply a limitation of the camera body. You need something like the 580EXII to control group C.


1

Your setup should be sufficient with the white paper on the wall and a neutral white (not warm, not cool) lamp. However, if you are going to chroma key out the back drop, your setup may cast your shadow onto it. Having a uniform backdrop is essential when using chroma key. You can do a couple things to reduce or eliminate shadows on a backdrop. Add ...


0

I'll be the first to comment that some white paints are "more white" than others - make sure to calibrate first, especially since you are capturing skin tones. Depending on your platform, you should have white balance tools for your webcam available to you. I've noticed, for example, that the auto white balance in software tends to calibrate for the blue ...



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