Napioa - Wind Origins

Napioa - Wind Origins
by octopus                

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3

It sounds like your core question here is how to convert the "1536 LM" — presumably meaning lm, the standard prefix for lumens — to an exposure value which you can use to find camera settings. That's fundamentally the same question as How do I compare a continuous light panel's brightness vs. flash through a softbox? There I was starting with candelas ...


0

Using f2.8, ISO 12,800, and exposure 1/1000 second, Sunny 16 calculates EV6. That is somewhere between a night street scene [EV7] and night automotive traffic[EV5]. I'd set those parameters manually rather than hoping auto ISO gets it right.


1

Can I get bright detail and dark background photos using a phone camera and basic editing? Answering the question literally, no. The key element of this type of photography is not particular to any camera technology (be it camera phone or professional medium-format camera), nor is it particular to a particular type of post-processing. The key feature ...


1

Another difference: pulsing artifacts when used for stage lighting. LEDs arrays are dimmed/colored by being pulsed at full power rather than run continuously at partial power. While this is also how modern tungsten dimmers work, tungsten (and phosphor-based LEDs) tend to produce light that is an average of the power input. The RGB composition LEDs in ...


4

Ill throw some advice in there (I also happen to be a pilot) Instrument Lights: Unless you are shooting some kind of piper cub or something chances are the instrument panel is lit its self. Don't be afraid to use the instrument lights during the day to add some fill light. The type of lights vary by aircraft but you may be able to make the instruments ...


3

To get rid of nasty reflections from glass surfaces a really great thing to do is crossing polarizer filters on flash and lens. In practice, you put a polarizer foil (can be found in broken lcd panels for example if you don't want to buy it) on the flash and then turn the polarizer on your lens until the affect is achieved as much as you like it. Watch out, ...


3

I'll use a tripods and take multiple exposures shoots for HDR (natural looking HDR, not the cartoonish kind). Then composed the shoots so all the instruments are clear and in focus, but also thanks to HDR allows the viewer to see though the windows. I'll reduce reflections by using a polarising filter, and being on a tripods the reduction in light doesn't ...


4

It can definitely be a problem, especially if the LED lights in question are not white LED lights. White LED lights, at least the higher quality ones, put out enough red, green, and blue light to work fairly well for most cameras. The results might not be as ideal as a fuller spectrum light source, but you can usually get pretty close. Typical high quality ...


4

The real answer is 'depends'. White LED usually consists of phosphor (react with the chip emission) layered on a diode (such as GaN, which emits violet light 405nm) that's why they are white. The phosphor gets activated by the light from the chip and emits another wavelength of light, hence different colour in a mixture to produce white. Wavelength of ...


0

Safety first You do not need Photoflood anymore. Thoose lamps where from a date that you need somehow well calibrated tungsten lamp on film. But this days you can use a vast array of lamps that generate no heat (or very little) and white balance your camera. You can even use a not that powerfull fluorescent lamp from the kitchen. What would be the Best ...


3

Metal surfaces are one of the most difficult things to photograph. You're on the right track with using diffused lighting but if, as you say, the diffusers you have are "taking away too much light" then you have to compensate for that by using a tripod and longer shutter speeds. I've used white umbrellas with the light shining through them to light metal ...


0

As it has only recently become free, I'd now experiment with the Nik Collection (of plug-ins to LR and PS) - they do also work standalone. The collection is from Google. It is early days practising here, but instead of using a WB blanket adjustment, start in PS / LR in RAW, then work in Nik, then return a masking layer from Nik into PS. Then you only allow ...


0

As far as composition goes, the first photo has a lot of good things: diagonals, good color contrast, the dark head of the pigeon is framed by the light blue background, there are interesting shadows etc. The myna shot is a more interesting pose of the bird itself, but the background is distracting. The white walls at the edges draw the eye away from the ...


0

As Rafael has pointed out, the birds are not going to pose for your camera, so you got to take the shot quickly when they arrive. What you can try to do is exposure bracketing, usually the bird will be quite a bit darker than the background. The pictures should then be combined into a HDR picture using masking methods, because the bird will move a bit during ...


3

What you need to improve is your own analysis. The photos probably are ok for one reason, the birds are there and you probably have little time to take the shoot. Any change could mean that you loose the shoot. I feel it's perfect shot. But if you close your own doors and you are self-congratulatory you have reached your own peak. Michael Clark made ...



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