India Point Park

India Point Park
by matt-ball                

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0

One big difference is that emitted light comes from a point source generally -- the filament of a lamp, or an LED, or the sun -- and reflected light, assuming a non-shiny surface, does not have a point source (unless it's a perfect reflection of a point light source, such as a lamp in a mirror). This can produce different types of shadow edges and different ...


1

Don't think of it as a light source, but as a shade source. There are, of course, reasons why a photographer might want to use an overhead light source, but your question didn't mention anything other than the panel. That leads me to believe that you are referring to location fashion, glamour and beach bunny shots of the sort that make their way into ...


-1

Overcast photography is one of my favorite lighting. Being based in the Nordic we got plenty of overcast days. I wrote an blog post on the topic not long ago, I hope you'll enjoy it. http://guldmann.wordpress.com/2016/02/02/i-wish-for-a-cloudy-day/ anyone able to elaborate on ND filters and over cast days ?


9

The color temperature of your bulbs is not as important as you seem to think. What is important if you require fairly critical color accuracy is that, regardless of the temperature their output is centered on, your bulbs need to output most if not all of the full spectrum of visible light. In general for photographic purposes you want lights with a Color ...


-1

You don't need to shoot with "daylight" bulbs. Just match the camera white balance to match the light source. That WILL be the right temperature. If you shoot RAW is doesn't really matter at all because you can change it or fine tune it in post processing. I would suggest large wattage 5000K Compact Flourescent bulbs. A 45W CFL equals about 200W. They are ...


1

The lighting doesn't look overly complex to me. Mainly I see what looks like a large softbox to camera right, and a hairlight to camera left. I mocked it up using the virtual lighting studio here: The background gradient could be achieved in a lot of different ways, but likely is just from adding a gel to a strobe. It could just as easily be achieved in ...


0

I did this a few times, it is a lot of work in post, but works great with low budget and no assistance. Camera in tripod, small aperture, low iso, remote trigger for ambient/background, no people around. After that, people aligne and form, I adjust focus and aperture if needed. Then I proceeded to walk in font of the group, left to right, holding a medium ...


0

Ideally, you'd want two lights on stands, with umbrellas to soften the light. Each light should be pointed toward the opposite end of the group at as close to a 45-degree angle as possible. This distributes the light across the group more evenly. Here's a quick-and-dirty diagram to illustrate:


2

It is impossible to give you an exact answer because there are too many variables involved: 1) power of your flash 2) size and shape of your umbrella 3) type of cover being used 4) the working distance from the subject 5) etc. Using the cover would mean less light would reach the subject. A rough guess would be about 1 stop of light, (f/5.6 instead of ...


1

For the shiny skin look you want to use a posing oil. Muscle Juice seems to be quite popular, but you could also use small amounts of baby oil. Nothing too excessive, the skin still needs to breathe. To get the ripples and contours with your lighting you need to create shadows, which is best accomplished by having your lights almost horizontally opposed, ...


4

The second photo is makeup, some kind of methalic paint on it. But the first one is easy to achive. I posted a simmilar efect tutorial here: http://graphicdesign.stackexchange.com/questions/50918/things-to-consider-when-creating-realistic-highlights-and-dark-reflections-on-me/50925#50925 The specific step is this: Starting Image: 4. The curves Here ...


0

Use multiple directional light sources with narrow coverage. Unlike most portrait techniques that use the broadest, softest light that can be cast on the subject here you want to only light specific areas that you wish to emphasize and leave the less flattering features in the shadows. Think several small flashes with snoots. Light each area independently of ...


2

The 2 lightstands is not a good option for reflective surface for locations. It is a waste of 1 lightstand anyway. And you have now a big parashute. Take a look at big foldable reflectors: https://www.google.com.mx/search?q=foldable+big+reflector&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj-9f2xrarKAhXKqR4KHSeyBGgQ_AUIBygB&biw=1177&bih=625 ...



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