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by VonSchnauzer

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13

From my point of view - or how I use my gels - there are two main usage points: Adjusting a color to get a color effect. For example make your flash-light red/green/... to get a interesting background color spot. Adjusting flash color to the color of ambient light, so that your picture have only one color of light. If you have different light-colors in one ...


10

Yes, their main purpose is to have different colors on different lights. However in the vast majority of cases (if not always) you simply cannot reproduce this setup in post. The human eye is quite good at detecting natural light falloff and it will detect the things which are Photoshopped, especially if we talk about a setup with multiple lights (we ...


9

In the immortal words of the late National Geographic photo editor Bob Gilka, "Kid, if you want to be a better photographer, you're going to have to stand in front of more interesting stuff." That said, welcome to the sometimes not-so-wonderful world of the commercial/industrial photographer. As often as not, making a dramatic, exciting picture of something ...


8

First of all, it's important to realize that, when you photograph a reflective object, you're actually photographing the surrounding scenery as it reflects off the object. This means that it's not enough to just set the object in a lightbox and maybe point some spot lights at it, at least unless you want to make the reflections rather simple and dull. ...


6

Lightmeters are superior to in camera metering because they are able to measure the incident light, not just the light reflected off the subject. Reflected light metering is less accurate as the camera/meter has no way of telling the difference between a white cat that is massively underexposed and a black cat that is correctly exposed. With incident ...


5

If light colors don't match (or you don't want them to match and they do) then you can't correct for this in post. Lights interact with each other and there is no good way to tell which light is contributing where in a reliable and automatic manner in post. This means that you can not adjust the color characteristics of an individual light after shooting. ...


5

You need to shoot at either sunrise or set (sunset is generally warmer in tone), when the sun is very low in the sky. Shoot with the sun behind the model (taking care not to look directly at it if possible). As you are shooting into the sun, you need some light source to light the front of your model: this could either be a diffused flash or a reflector. As ...


3

Umbrellas work just fine with speedlights. The light from a speedlight is not too directed for that, especially if you use white umbrellas which will spread the light more or less independently of which direction it came from. I will echo James's comment to check out Strobist.com for info on how to make good use of off-camera speedlights. The most useful ...


3

When it comes to diffusers you should be looking to use the same sizes as you would for monolights. The flash tube of a monolight often isn't that much larger than the head of a speedlight and the size of the modifier is mainly what creates the effect. This is echoed by the soft mods section in Strobist blog's gear recommendations. Strobist blog is highly ...


3

Putting the lightmeter under the chin makes sense to me because: a) It is incident light what's being measured, and the little sphere is to be located as close as posible to the surface being iluminated (i.e. the face's skin). Putting the lightmeter at the same distance from the light source is crucial as light intensity varies with distance to the source. ...


3

In digital photography, the most issues come from the dark portions of the image where sensor noise has the most impact on the quality of the result. Electronic sensors accumulate light, but while they are collecting light, they also collect random noise. To avoid this noise being an issue, a technique known as ETTR or exposure to the right is even used ...


2

One main reason color gels are used on flashes is to match ambient lighting so that white-balance correction doesn't become a post-processing nightmare. When you use a flash, the color temperature of the light that comes from the flash is often different from that of the ambient lighting. And the mixed sources of lighting will both hit the same subject and ...


2

There's a bit of post production going on in that image that is probably clouding things somewhat. If you look at the area at the top of the image it's clearly been blown out (overexposed) and then brought back from pure white to a dirty grey pink colour. This says to me two things - the contrast of the image has been lowered so that the blacks and whites ...


2

As in many cases the key to reverse engineering the light lies in the catchlights (reflections of the original lighting in the subject's eyes): Here we can see that a single hard (no diffuser) lightsource was placed above and to the right of the subject (as the camera sees it). There were no other lightsources on the subject, but in many of the images a ...


2

My understanding of subtractive lighting is such that you take control of natural ambient lighting by reducing or reflecting it. This work looks more like it was taken indoors, and more in line with low-key photography, essentially photography in which shadows are the predominant part of the photo. The basic setup is a very dark room, one strong light, ...


1

Feathering light means you use that area of tonal transition from the highlights to the shadows created by the edge of the light modifier. The technique is most easy to achieve with softboxes and beauty dishes because there’s a sharply defined edge to the modifier itself. That’s also why feathering light with most lighting brollies is less effective because ...


1

There is an article on strobist that goes over shooting a CFL bulb. The author forgoes HDR and the like and just uses speedlights. If you don't have access to strobes and are only using continuous lighting, then you can still balance the CFL with your other lighting; simply set your camera up for a longer exposure (stopping down the lens, low iso, and low ...


1

While the specifics are somewhat brand-dependent, this question has essentially been answered already in one of your follow-up questions. Start with the following assumptions: There is no magic involved; everything that happens will be as simple as it possibly can be and still work; The system is not and cannot be foolproof; any sufficiently advanced fool ...



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