Nidelva river through Trondheim Norway

Nidelva river through Trondheim Norway
by Saaru Lindestokke                

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3

It sounds like your core question here is how to convert the "1536 LM" — presumably meaning lm, the standard prefix for lumens — to an exposure value which you can use to find camera settings. That's fundamentally the same question as How do I compare a continuous light panel's brightness vs. flash through a softbox? There I was starting with candelas ...


3

Put one light behind the subject pointing at the background. Light naturally becomes less intense, the further you are away from the light source. You can further manipulate the falloff with modifiers: speedlights often have a zoom feature to narrow or widen the cone of light produced. light modifiers for strobes can sometimes be moved back and forth in ...


3

I love photo math but that approach will drive you crazy and nothing will come of it. The Guide Number method is tried and true. Once you know the guide number for your flash or combination of flashes, you divide the subject distance into that value. Suppose the guide number is 200 and the subject is 18 feet from the camera. The math is: 200 ÷ 18 = 11. ...


3

Without getting into the mathematics of the situation which is covered by others with graphs and equations, let me try to clarify the difference between these two different aspects of the lighting. Quantity and quality. The quantity or the amount of light is determined by how far the light travels. All other things being equal, the shorter the distance the ...


2

Assuming that the video you saw is this one, rewatch the near/far usage of the light, but pay attention to the line of the shadow on the model's face. Note that when the model is near the softbox, that the line is wider and blurrier, i.e., softer light. But when the model is farther away from the softbox, that line becomes smaller and more defined, i.e., ...


2

"Soft light" is a term used to refer to light that produces diffuse shadows father than distinct shadows. But that doesn't mean you can't have some areas that are very dark and other areas that are very bright when using soft light. It just means the transitions from the bright areas to the dark areas are more gradual and less distinct. The reason you want ...


2

The flash must recycle before it is triggered. Some flashes refuse to trigger unless recycled, but most will flash anyway, but at a lower unrecycled output (irregular illumination results). A speedlight might need 2+ seconds to recycle if at full power level, but it recycles tremendously fast at low power levels. Try it about at 1/8 power level, then ...


1

If you want an even stronger effect, take two lights with directivity (not wide-angle flood) and place them well off to your right and left, aimed at the subject. What light doesn't hit the subject will travel out of frame, leaving the background dark. Sort of like "dark field" illumination in microscopy. This can produce strong highlights on the ...


1

1) A difuse light. You can see that this is so by the shadow. (My gess a 2x2 feet softbox) 2) A grid or a simply cone (or a box) of dark paper (snoot). You can see that is lighting very specific in front of the guy when he goes back. 3) Try putting it just over the guy and start moving it to the camera. 4) I have the feeling it is not too close to your ...


1

It is quite possible within certain parameters. Those parameters would include the ability of the camera body to regulate the continuous drive rate, the ability of the flash to provide the needed light at a power level setting that allows for a fast recycle rate, and the ability of the photographer to find the rate where the capabilities of the camera and ...


1

Any material that is transparent such as glass, water, booze, Jello™, plastics, (and air bubbles) etc. have two basic lighting methods for display. Dark-line technique which uses a light background to produce dark edges or White-line technique which uses a dark background to produce light edges. The iStock photo uses the dark line lighting technique that ...



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