Lightnings taking a ride

by ceinmart

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14

Ruined? That's a great photo! (If you were going for a sort of Halloween effect.) The position of the key light – off to the side and elevated – was perfect for this subject, and is typical of how beauty dishes are used. Now, if you didn't want the shadow here are things to consider: Using a single source you can't have the subject against ...


7

As a rule of thumb if you can do it in-camera then you should. If nothing else, getting that kind of mask right in post processing can be time consuming and fiddly. It all adds time to your workflow that you don't really need to spend. Do it with a backdrop and a coloured sheet - it'll be slightly more difficult to set up initially but once it's done once ...


5

I have a Godox V860C light and a Godox Cells II remote trigger. OK, from this, I gather that you have a Canon camera. The Godox V860C is an eTTL-II-capable flash, so if you want to use that capability, it's there. However, the Cells II triggers are manual triggers that do not communicate eTTL information, so with this specific combination you do not ...


5

Despite the name of your modifier (Profoto White Softlight 20.5" Reflector), this is no soft light at all. The light source is far away and small enough to produce hard light on the subject. The most common property that makes light hard or soft is how smooth the shadows are. This can be seen from the shadow under the chin on the neck. The shadow has a sharp ...


3

My short answer is just move the model a little further from the background. The rest are just some additional opinions. An additional thing is subjective, because it is modifying the light style: It is moving the light source a bit to your right. In my opinion the light is a little "plain" because it feels too close to the camera. If you move your ...


3

To get colors right you need to color calibrate everything. You need to calibrate the camera with something like a color checker passport (for every lighting setup). You need your editing area to mostly color neutral (something colorful in your field of view while editing will throw your color perception off). You have to calibrate your screen with proper ...


3

You can realistically use either. However both come with their own limitations and drawbacks. If you use high ISO then your image quality will start to degrade, causing what is commonly referred to as noise in the image. This means people generally try to avoid using high ISOs when shooting photographs. On the other hand if you use brighter lighting then ...


2

Without going into technicalities, I can provide some user experience. Having hired both reflectors for a previous job; firstly, the Zoom reflectors were a lot smaller, 7-8in in diameter and about 6in depth and the Widezoom reflector was a lot larger, about twice the size from what I can recall. The zoom reflector at position 10 gave a harder shadow than ...


2

The idea is to overpower the relative ambient light with the flash. So the first step would be to diminish the ambient light, with either shutter speed, ISO settings, and probably ND filter. If you use a fast shutter speed function on a flash, there is a chance the flash will not work with full power but a fraction, because it is using a series of bursts. ...


2

A partial answer: Does E-TTL work when the flash is off shoe? I don't think it does. If so, does that mean the E-TTL is pointless whenever shooting off-shoe? You need to set the 3 parts to TTL mode: the flash, the trigger, and the camera. I put the flash in manual mode and on full power (1/1). I should be in manual mode, right? If any of the 3 ...


1

When photographing still life with multiple light sources, reflectors and flags, I find that I if I happen to be using the camera’s on board spot metering, it rarely provides the correct exposure to bring out the colours that I consider to be true. I find, in general, the in-camera auto WB brings about the same results as a grey card and minor adjustments ...


1

The math on two fstops is the square root of the sum of the two squares, but I don't know about EV. If the lights were equal, and if they lighted the same overlapping area, twice the light is one stop additional. But you say the ambient is 3 stops down from the lamp, so it won't have much effect. This ambient adds less than 0.2 stop increase, not over ...


1

Looking at the shade from her hair and arm it looks like a single light was used. Looks like a beauty dish to me. I think I would go with just a single head in a Beauty Dish, with the dish being above and slightly left of the camera. I would angle it directly at her face, it seems that's where most of the light is going.


1

Does "brighter lighting" mean you have control over the scene, or (like other answerers assume) you are referring to a hand-held flash? If you are lighting the scene, or can influence the lights being used for the situation, then by all means use brighter and better-quality light! If you can place remote slaves ahead of time, "more light" that way is good. ...


1

I would consider a shoot through umbrella that also can be used with a cover as an umbrella to reflect the light to be the most versatile. For portraits you can do a lot with an umbrella and a bare flash, of course you'll need to flash units for that. On camera I wouldn't waste your money on a Fong Bong, just make sure your flash can rotate properly and ...


1

You could try using a Neutral Density (ND) filter to reduce the amount of light that enters the lens. This also allows you to have a more open aperture and get a shallower depth of field when shooting. The type of ND filter you should use depends on how dark you want it, but for outdoor portraits when it's sunny, you'd typically use a ND102 or ND103 filter, ...


1

It really depends on the angle of the sun at the time you take your photos and how much of the background is in the shade and how much is in direct sunlight. Anything from a small reflector to powerful studio strength flashes might be needed for fill light. To use f/2.8 at ISO 400 you're probably going to need some sort of neutral density filter unless you ...


1

An easy way to experiment with the look of old films is using this online emulator and if you are interested in the technology behind it, parts of the source code seem available (make sure to read the license carefully, though, it's not "free" software). The whole thing is based on color lookup-tables, see also Pat David's blog: ...


1

You can pretty much ignore the baffles. Just duct tape a CTO gel sheet/s to the inside of the softbox between the two diffusers. Been meaning to play with this for a while and it works nicely. I used a white lit background, set a custom white balance to cancel out the CTO and the background turned a lovely, evenly lit blue. Also used a grid to keep the ...



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