Serene Life

by garik

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3

The 70D unfortunately doesn't support controlling group C directly. It will however fire group C flashes when set to fire ALL. (Source: The manual) The Canon optical wireless flash system still contains all three groups, it is simply a limitation of the camera body. You need something like the 580EXII to control group C.


3

See How does the colour of ambient lighting affect colour rendition?, because that question uses a sodium vapor light as an example. As the answers there explain, sodium vapor lights produce a very, very narrow spectrum of light: CC-BY-SA image from Wikimedia Commons, author Philips Lighting And in fact, this is effectively monochrome. Your only options ...


2

Philosophical Ramblings: I commend you on exploring. Having developed the Faith that something useful exists, and taking the effort and time to make the journey. Acting to extinguish self-deceit. Perhaps a more "Useful" commentary: What might happen if you take your camera with a flash unit attached, and turn it upside down to take the picture? Put it ...


2

Absolutely! You're using this for a video setup, but it's common in still photography with strobes, where this technique is known as "bounce flash". The caveat is that strobes — like from studio lighting, from hotshoe flashes, or even from the popup flash of a camera — are very short intense bursts of light. Your lamp, and probably even your spotlight, ...


2

It will work after a fashion, but you'll get substantial reduction in light level when the light is reflected. In your application it may well be adequate. If you wish to use a diffuser you do not need a formal or commercial one. The paper that you intend stick on the wall could be used instead as a diffuser - it may prove too opaque, but it's easily ...


2

Sodium vapor lights lamps come in two types - there is the low pressure which is nearly yellow (589.0 nm and 589.6nm) and the high pressure which produces a more pinkish tone which has a few other elements doping it and resulting in a more 'natural' color rendition. The low pressure one is trivial to filter out with a common filter for photography, and the ...


1

Do you know how the image was made? It looks to me a lot like some of the flower images created by Katinka Matson. They're gorgeous, but they're not photographs -- the flowers are arranged on a flatbed scanner and scanned. The way the light falls off quickly and uniformly around the flower looks a lot like what you see in Matson's work.


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To hazzard a guess, I would say that the lighting was done with a twin-tube affair, with the tubes arranged above and below the lens. The upper tube was the main (more powerful) light; the lower tube was fill at about half the upper tube's power (down 1 stop, or a 1:2 ratio with the "A" tube at the top). To get the fall-off you see from front to back, the ...


1

Your setup should be sufficient with the white paper on the wall and a neutral white (not warm, not cool) lamp. However, if you are going to chroma key out the back drop, your setup may cast your shadow onto it. Having a uniform backdrop is essential when using chroma key. You can do a couple things to reduce or eliminate shadows on a backdrop. Add ...


1

You, sir, are right on. What I like about your propposed setup is the simplicity, and the effectivity. You'd save space, time and money and will be able to get very, very good results. You can improve the reflactivity of your bounce difuser by choosing solid cardboard as white as possible. You can also use translucent paper with aluminum foil as a backing, ...


1

It may be possible to get most of this effect in-camera without special equipment, it shouldn't be to difficult to try - here's my attempt at deconstructing the images: Shoot raw, we are playing with lighting and it will help if we are able to fix things in post. The pictures are outside in the sunlight, try mid morning or late afternoon, it's not golden ...


1

Two ways to do it (in Photoshop) are to: Duplicate the layer of the image you want to lighten Go to Image>>Adjustment>>Exposure. Adjust to the lightness you want... THEN duplicate that layer (Note: you know have 3 layers) Go to >>Filters>>Blur>>Gaussian Blur Adjust the Gaussian Blur to a number like say "6" Really blow it out. Hit "OK" ...



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