Shadowy Daisy

Shadowy Daisy
by damned-truths

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12

I'm not a photography expert at all, but I have spent my whole life playing, buying, and most importantly looking at pictures of games of various kinds. I also have painted many miniatures and developed ways to take good pictures of them without spending a lot of money on serious photo equipment over the years. So here are some thoughts from a gamer ...


10

Get a polarizer filter. You'd typically want the "circular" ones, though in this day and age you'd be hard-pressed to find one that's not. I noticed that your first and third shots show some reflection due to the board's gloss---you can remove that with a polarizer. Though most cameras not featuring an interchangeable lens system don't allow filters to be ...


9

This feedback covers the framing of the shots, less the technical aspect of it. I would dig more into the feedback you got - I was told recently that my image work needed to improve. What is important to the editors? I wouldn´t worry about taking the games outside during winter, unless this is where the boardgames are beeing played. One idea to take the ...


6

Hmm. Looks like a large light source (probably artificial, possibly a flash in a portable softbox) (soft shadows, black background), decent lens at a "good" aperture (guessing at f11-f16, but I don't know how large the animals are, so I can't be sure, and I didn't peek at the exif for the photos, if there is any), fairly good focus (though the top frog's ...


6

Re studio and ": I can't fit an entire board into a small light tent.": for a still-life, you can do without a formal or elaborate "studio". If you use a reasonable tripod, you can take an exposure time that's as long as necessary to handle the "available light". And that's the specific term you can search on for more about available light photography. So, ...


5

... so what other lighting options do I have? Get flash gear and learn off-camera lighting. Off-camera lighting is the go-to knowledge for most product-photography. You'd have outgrown a light tent pretty fast anyway. Might as well start out with umbrellas and lights on stands with radio triggers, and have all the control. If your advanced compact has a ...


4

To complement other answers: there is a lot you can do in post production as well. Here's what can be achieved after playing 5 minutes in Lightroom: EDIT - after using the dehaze filter:


3

I'm a novice photographer. The best advice I can give is using macro, good lighting and some post production using software's like adobe lightroom. Since you're trying to photograph board games, that usually involve small dice and other tiny 'accessories', I really recommend using the macro mode on your camera. The macro mode is basically a setting in ...


2

There are only two different "kinds" of light that we now know about. The first is divergent light that is relatively random and what our eyes have evolved to use to interpret the world around us. It obeys the "inverse-square law." The second is monochromatic, collimated light, which is highly parallel and does not comply with the "inverse-square law." ...


2

Just addressing the light tent bit of your question: You can get white plastic shower curtains from ikea for very little money. With bamboo canes form the garden centre (or even chairs) and some tape you can make a pretty servicable table-sized light tent. This works better than a white bedsheet as if it ends up in shot the weave of the fabric can show up....


2

Well you asked a loaded question for sure. Music and photography have a similar language. In order to communicate ideas, you need to know how to speak the language. You also need to have the gear and skills of how to use it. Remember the camera is as dumb as a rock. Ok, here goes. If I told you I was a professional photographer and was asked to write a ...


1

Focus Stacking. You put the camera on a tripod, use manual focussing, and then take a serious of shots, shifting the focus plane a bit after each shot. Once you have some training, that works very quick - turn the focus ring a bit, click, turn, click, ... Then, in a post-processing software, you 'stack' all shots over each other, and select from each shot ...



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