Antarctica

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19

That comes down to color temperature of the ambient light. Flash always has something similar to daylight (5500-6500K), so you need to use conversion gels from daylight. Most useful gel is CTO (color temperature orange), which will color daylight to tungsten (3200K). Usage is as follows:Stick CTO gel on flashSet color temperature to tungstenShoot This has ...


17

Soft boxes typically have a more focused and sometimes more powerful quality of light while remaining soft. The biggest reason you might want to use a soft box over an umbrella is to control the spill of light. Where an umbrella will reflect light into a scene as well as transmit through the material, a soft box will force all light to either die or be ...


16

To remove light. If you're shooting outside, or in a place where there's lots of background light being bounced around, it might not be enough to place an item to create a shadow onto your object, since light reflected off of that item might still give you tints or light you don't want. A black "reflector" creates shadow and doesn't reflect light (or as ...


16

I have the Lumiquest Softbox III that's mentioned, and I find it useful as a super-portable softbox that's better than nothing. Given the option to have a huge softbox that would be my first choice, but the small softbox, placed very close to a subject, works really well and provides a much softer directional light than one would get with a bare flash or ...


15

This kind of flash diffuser produces a "bare-bulb" effect. It's not like a softbox or umbrella, which works by effectively making a larger light source. Instead, it makes the light from your flash less focused, so it's diffused by bouncing off walls and other objects. Normally, a hotshoe flash works like a spotlight — it focuses its output in a cone. That's ...


15

Optically, all this should do is reduce the output power of the flash. The filters on the sensor itself are going to make it so you only get the red green and blue on each pixel. This device would just absorb a bunch of the light that could reach the subject. For example, some of the light to bounce off a red part is going to reach a blue sensor and not ...


14

Basically, it's to subtract light. It can reduce bounced light or provide isolation of your subject to make it stand out more. I do this all the time with things like smoke photography because it eliminates stray light and provides a clean, dark, background for the smoke to stand out. For example:


13

It will reduce the total amount of light that your flash can put out. It will also use more power for the same amount of light hitting your subject. When indoors, if your flash can bounce/swivel but the wall is further away, you will probably be better off bouncing without a diffuser. Harsh shadows are due to a small apparent light source (light ...


12

You have more control over spill and hot spots with a softbox. The hot spots are much less significant with a softbox.


12

The most available large sheet material is corrugated cardboard. If you have a single layer sheet, you should first glue at least another single layer sheet on top of it to make it more stable. Rotate one of the sheets by 90° so that the "grain directions" of the layers cross each other. Like plywood. For the reflective surfaces: White paper provides a ...


11

Yes, a closer light will fall off faster due to the inverse square law. For a very close light, one cheek of your subject will be relatively much closer than the other. With a larger light further away, the distances will be much more similar, so less fall off. This will make a difference to the apparent softness of the light.


11

An octabox will give you nice round catchlights and produce generally more natural looking highlights and reflections. The straight edge of a softbox often sticks out when shooting with reflective surfaces more than a more organic curve or circle. On the other hand softboxes are easier to mask and gobo due to the straight edges, and more suitable to certain ...


11

Hard light (i.e. a single bare lightsource) from underneath. Look at any old black and white horror film and you'll see this technique used. Or for a more modern example of the [mis]use of this technique see Jill Greenberg's photos of John McCain: http://www.rachelhulin.com/blog/2008/09/pdn-on-jill-greenberg-the-atlantic-and-john-mccain.html


10

There are a few reasons that I'm aware of to combine soft-box and an additional diffuser: With smaller softboxes and hotter lights (read: flashes) the softbox isn't always able to completely diffuse the light source, which causes a 'hotspot'... Essentially the center of the diffusion 'square' is brighter than the edges. It's better than a 'nekkid' flash, ...


7

Shouldn't it be possible to attach some kind of gel holder directly to the flash unit, and then softbox on top of that?


7

A beauty dish gives a softer light than an unmodified flash, but not as soft as a softbox or shoot-through umbrella. This means that you can control the light more than when using a softbox. A beauty dish is often used in portrait work, and can be flattering when used as a light on the subject's face, where it can give a nice balance between even ...


7

Automotive windshield reflectors can function well as photographic reflectors. The best ones are the shiny silver accordion-fold ones (they often have a "bubble wrap" -like core).


6

catch lights: round/octagonal with umbrellas, square with softboxes ease of setup - umbrellas are generally much easier to set up and attach to a stand stability - umbrellas tend to catch the wind outdoors and tumble more than soft boxes spill - umbrellas will spill more light which can be a problem in close quarters (however there are so-called umbrella ...


6

There's only one disadvantage that it may not have the effect you are looking for. A diffuser spreads the light in more directions than the flash illuminates without the diffuser. Reasons why this might be unhelpful include: You end up with less light going in the direction the flash is pointing. If you are short of light anyway (e.g. the flash is the ...


6

Imagine your subject in a very small room, and the walls are painted in red. A large window is giving you some very lovely soft light on the subject's face. You have decided there is no need for fill light (either because the light is soft enough, or you are happy with the contrast/shadow). But wait, since the room is so small, the sunshine is hitting on ...


6

IMO, it's mostly a waste of time to even try. It's color is going to shift over time, and if it's like most things that are "white", it'll include some "brighteners" -- fluorescent dyes, so the ultraviolet content in the light makes it glow a bit. These mean the color of the fabric varies based in the light (specifically its UV content). Instead, therefore, ...


6

A snoot would have stronger edges on the shadow, but then it depends on the size of the grid also. You can check this comparison of different light sources and this nice setup.


6

You're correct. When the black covering is on, the umbrella is intended to reflect the light. When the black cover is off, you change the orientation of the umbrella so that your light goes through it instead (shoot through). Your linked item describes that in the product description. It's a handy feature to have (I have a couple of the Paul Buff ones) ...


6

A regular softbox is not going to fit on this type of light. They are designed for strobes with a single bulb which acts as a point light source and attach via a small hole in the back. This light seems to consist of a series of florescent tubes and is thus a much larger lightsource to begin with, and will be pretty soft in it's standard configuration. You ...


6

I have a Godox V860C light and a Godox Cells II remote trigger. OK, from this, I gather that you have a Canon camera. The Godox V860C is an eTTL-II-capable flash, so if you want to use that capability, it's there. However, the Cells II triggers are manual triggers that do not communicate eTTL information, so with this specific combination you do not have ...


6

A large piece of foam core board (or mat board) is good for portraits. Clamped on a stand opposite of a soft box (key light) just outside of framing. It could be black on one side for absorbing light for more dramatic shadows. Or paint it gold or...?


5

That's going to vary a great deal depending on whether it's a bounce or shoot-through, what material is used, etc. In general, the range can be as little as 1/2 stop (or less) through to several stops. If you're interested in a particular brand, you can probably find details on light loss in the product literature. Lastolite, for example, will supply the ...



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