Butterfly

by Rodrigo

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1

I did some experimenting in order to answer basically this for myself in the question Is the Deflector Plate recommended when using a Westcott Rapid Box with the cover on? — where the "Rapid Box" in question is an internal-umbrella style softbox as you describe. Here's one of my experiments from that answer: You can see that with the bare flash, the ...


1

One thing is the contrast between light and "no light", the other is how sharp is the edge of the light. The first light in the image is of "spot" type with very sharp edge, so the shadow is very deep. The other lights (for example flash using a light modifier like umbrella), the light does not have sharp edges and light falls off slowly with shadows ...


3

Various sources indicate that average reflectance of surfaces is somewhere between 12-18%. Calculating exposure from table values is not very typical. Most photographers would use a light meter, either built in or external.


7

Luckily I have a D80, so I tried to replicate your experiment. Unfortunately: It was during the day; I was in my garage, though it has a window from which some light leaked inside; My cabinet is wooden, not steel; My lens is a Sigma 18-50 f/2.8, unlike yours ;) But I did use the lens cap, I did close the cabinet, and I set the aperture at f/22, just in ...


8

I recommend this paper for possible explanations. It’s about the Pancams used in both Mars Exploration Rovers. It describes a thorough examination of noise sources in CCDs and describes the detailed calibration routine for the Pancam CCDs. Here is the Link to the paper: Mars Exploration Rover Athena Panoramic Camera (Pancam) investigation (PDF Document) ...


31

First, understand a couple of things: Even though we call these things "digital cameras," the process of turning photons into numbers is entirely analog. Analog circuits pick up all manner of noise from their surroundings. Noise isn't one constant value, it's a range of them that top out at a level called the noise floor. The processing you did on the ...


11

This is basically noise, but from several different mechanisms. Consider the extreme amplification of small details you had to apply to get this picture. There are several distinct source of noise here. The overall graininess is random noise from individual sensels. This is going to happen. Every sensor has some finite random noise added to whatever ...


-1

The image was taken with the lens cap on What is the partial circle apparent in the bulk of the frame? It's the lens cap.


23

Maybe it represents the small variation of the temperature of the sensor. A hot sensor produces more noise than a cool one. The small temperature difference can be explained by the presence of electronic components, or the way the sensor is in contact with other parts, allowing more or less heat dissipation. Some related links : ...


8

Is the lens cap the center-pinch style? Seems like you can see the contours of the cap in green. If so, the other visible shapes (circle) are probably due to lens features as well. Try removing the lens and shoot with a body cap attached to see how the image changes. The white portion could be light (IR, maybe) leaking in through the view finder. My camera ...


3

The best way would be to buy a Light Meter that specifically can measure color temperature. Something like a Sekonic C-500 for example. With a tool like that you can properly measure the ambient sources and determine their kelvin values. Then with that knowledge you can adjust your own lighting to match the desired ambient level(s). You might have clicked ...


1

The short answer is... make some tests. If you have a camera with manual mode, specificly you need to turn off auto white balance settings. Take some pictures of some white color objects, like a sheet of paper. This need not to be overexposed. Then you can use any photo editing software and compare the rgb values, and make some adjusments. If you want ...


0

The problem of your setup is not only a different colour temperature but also a different spectrum of LEDs and CFLs. These discontinuous spectra might also cause the noise you wanted to reduce. Some colours are suppressed and your video camera probably tries to compensate/boost them thus adding the noise. If you want better results, check prices of ...


1

For the differing light temps, use colored sheets ("gels") made for that purpose. I set up continuous lighting for photography years ago, since the primitive digital camera couldn't handle studio strobes, and my wife wanted to shoot food and cooking things: it's easier to get the light right if you can see it the way it will be, and move things around. For ...


1

The lens your are using and how clean it is are heavily contributing, but the basic answer is how wide open you are shooting, the increased angle is allowing heavy light scatter present in the shooting environment to blur highlights.


7

The first shot is front focussed and looks like it was shot wide open, so a lot of the main part of the image is out of focus, which can result in glowy halos around highlights. However the effect is more extreme than I would expect, so my guess is the front element is dirty/greasy. It also looks quite a bit like spherical aberration to me which would ...


0

What I see seems to be excessive color saturation. If you are you using the Landscape Picture Style, it increases saturation; see http://www.digital-slr-guide.com/canon-60d-guide.html and http://www.dpreview.com/forums/thread/2940244. You can use an image processing tool, such as Adobe Photoshop or the free IrfaView, to adjust saturation, providing the JPEG ...



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