Shadowy Daisy

Shadowy Daisy
by damned-truths

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0

With all my respects to some other answers. It has NOTHING to do with dynamic range or RAW. Stan nailed it. You see your lamp translucent because you interact with it, you see it on the morning, and see it diferently on the evening or during the night. (Here is a similar situation, where you know there are sparkles because you interact with the real ...


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Transmitted light can have colors that can't be reproduced by reflected light. Practical implications: Prints have different color gamut than computer displays, so images often do not look the same on print and on display Digital camera calibration that uses reflective color targets does not cover the whole color range You are probably more likely to ...


2

There are only two different "kinds" of light that we now know about. The first is divergent light that is relatively random and what our eyes have evolved to use to interpret the world around us. It obeys the "inverse-square law." The second is monochromatic, collimated light, which is highly parallel and does not comply with the "inverse-square law." ...


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Capturing translucency requires the viewer to identify light showing through the object-being-portrayed as coming through the object from the background. This is not evident in either of your posted images. The object looks opaque due to the dominant lighting you have added from the camera-right side of the shot according to the highlights on the textured ...


3

If you had sheets of Rubylith masking film by ULANOâ„¢ you could lay a sheet over any device for a darkroom safe-light filter. If you peel off the strip-able layer, and it will cling right to the phone or pad screen as a Mylar layer does without any glue or moisture. It is perfectly transparent and you can see the tiniest details through the red layer. It's ...


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There's a product idea here, but it's not just an app. You need to produce screen protectors that are also safelight filters, so that people can safely use any app in the darkroom. A companion app with timers, calculators, chemistry data, etc., would complete the package.


3

Typical phone screens have too broad a spectrum to use as safelights (there's too much orange in the red channel). The red safelight spectrum here indicates that there's no light below 600nm. You'll get too much leakage below that from any LCD. With OLED you might be OK I've seen spectra that indicate that you would, and that you wouldn't (e.g. here, though ...



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