It's a bird

by Vian Esterhuizen

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46

This appears to be a beautiful example of Fraunhofer diffraction. It is due to the wave nature of light. The effect depends on the wavelength (that is, the color). It is most pronounced when bright light from a practically infinite distance passes through narrow slits, causing the light to spread perpendicular to the slits. This spreads a point-like beam ...


36

It's likely the sum of a few factors. Firstly, although you state "the same f-stop", it's important to realise that the manufacturer stated focal length and aperture values are often rounded, and not always in the way you'd expect. It might be the case that the Samyang is f/1.45 in reality, not f/1.4. The next factor is vignetting, wide aperture lenses are ...


31

First, understand a couple of things: Even though we call these things "digital cameras," the process of turning photons into numbers is entirely analog. Analog circuits pick up all manner of noise from their surroundings. Noise isn't one constant value, it's a range of them that top out at a level called the noise floor. The processing you did on the ...


23

"Colour" is essentially a property of the distribution of wavelengths of visible light (as perceived by humans). Digital cameras only detect the amount of light at each pixel, they can't measure the wavelength and thus can't record colours directly. Colour images are produced by placing alternating red/green/blue filters in front of each pixel. By placing a ...


23

Look at your own shadow. If you can't find your shadow then the light is as soft as it possibly can be. If you have a hard edged shadow then the light is hard. If you can make out your shadow but it's faint or the edges are not defined then you have somewhere in between (which can often give the best results).


23

Maybe it represents the small variation of the temperature of the sensor. A hot sensor produces more noise than a cool one. The small temperature difference can be explained by the presence of electronic components, or the way the sensor is in contact with other parts, allowing more or less heat dissipation. Some related links : ...


20

Body - you can get better high ISO performance from a full frame body, if you're willing to rent one. That's worth a couple of stops. Lens - another couple of stops if you buy/hire an f/1.4 or f/1.8 lens, especially if you're shooting at the long end of your zoom at f/5.6 Light - in the picture you've given as an example, you seem to be standing in the ...


19

You can definitely improve on the standard "cloudy day" look with some preparation at shooting time and a bit of post-processing afterwards. As you shoot... Switch the camera's white balance setting to cloudy: this will help keep the tones a bit warmer. Compose to avoid large amounts of sky: you can play with the rest of the photo in post-processing but a ...


17

Sunrise light is cooler (color temperature-wise) because there are less particles in the air, which is what gives sunsets their multicoloured nature.


16

Let's start with lenses at the same location, and then address the moving the longer lens farther away to get the same field of view. Lenses at the same location The 50mm f/1.4 lens has an effective aperture that's twice the diameter, and four times the area, of the 25mm f/1.4 lens. The 50mm will, therefore, collect four times as much light (four times as ...


16

The image we can see from an infrared camera is what is known as a false color image. What this means is that a range of wavelengths in the infrared spectrum are rendered with a corresponding wavelength of visible light. Just as with visible light, a particular wavelength of infrared light can vary in intensity from just above black (shadows) to near ...


15

This is known as a high-key photo, which basically means it is brighter than usual. The simplest way to go in that direction is to add positive exposure compensation to make the whole thing brighter without overexposing any important areas. Some cameras have a high-key mode that helps or you can tweak the brightness parameter (may be called differently ...


14

The problem is that the exposure meter in the camera does not know whether the subject itself is bright or not. It simply measures the amount of light that comes in, and makes a guess based on that. The camera will aim for 18% gray, meaning if you take a photo of an entirely white surface, and an entirely black surface you should get two identical images ...


14

It's due to diffraction where the aperture blades meet as stated by John and Pearsonartphoto. It's a neat way to test how many aperture blades you have! To answer your second question, the length of the exposure doesn't directly affect the effect. There are two main factors, the first is the size of the aperture (it needs to be small), and long exposures ...


14

This is usually due to a color temperature shift that occurs at certain points in the day, as the angle at which the light from the sun changes with the rising and setting sun. From Wikipedia: Typically, lighting is softer (more diffuse) and warmer in hue, and shadows are longer. When the Sun is near the horizon, sunlight travels through more of ...


13

What you encountered is the dynamic-range limit of your camera. All cameras and films have a limit to the dynamic-range they capture and scenes where the contrast is too high will always cause exactly this kind of problem. For cases with moving subjects, like a wedding, they are two avenues to diminish the issue: Reframe so that your subject is surrounded ...


13

No, this is not the case. Aperture F stops are calculated on pupil size and focal length of the lens. From wikipedia In optics, the f-number (sometimes called focal ratio, f-ratio, f-stop, or relative aperture1) of an optical system is the ratio of the lens's focal length to the diameter of the entrance pupil.2 It is a dimensionless number that is a ...


12

With regard to reasonably bright stellar objects: technically, yes. With regard to dimmer objects like those that make up most of what we mean when we say "The Milky Way": practically speaking, no. In addition to the phase of the Moon, which determines the overall amount of light falling on the atmosphere above a specific location on the Earth's surface, ...


12

The color correction is acting as expected. The point of using a color target is to adjust for the color of light to assume that the light is white. If you want to have the color that is present when shooting, you should instead use a fixed white point that you consider to be standard white, but naturally people's eyes will adjust quite a bit for the color ...


12

tl; dr. Blend a "panorama" from only slightly rotated exposures and make sure no flare is included in the final result. It's not possible to optically remove this type of flare when shooting into the sun (though different lenses have different levels of flare resistance). However, there are other effective ways to get rid of it. What you can do is take ...


11

I don't have an issue shooting images at any point during the day; I try to take advantages of the lighting and go from there. I would wholeheartedly say: SHOOT ANYTIME YOU CAN! Midday sun is overhead, and gives you dark (often called harsh shadows). On the plus side, mid-day sun is very bright and gives you plenty of opportunities for good exposures ...


11

Hard light (i.e. a single bare lightsource) from underneath. Look at any old black and white horror film and you'll see this technique used. Or for a more modern example of the [mis]use of this technique see Jill Greenberg's photos of John McCain: http://www.rachelhulin.com/blog/2008/09/pdn-on-jill-greenberg-the-atlantic-and-john-mccain.html


11

The problem with the photo is that the image is under exposed. The camera's meter tries to make everything an 18% gray and, well, that snow looks about an 18% gray to me so the meter was working 'correctly'. There are a couple different options to look for with this. The first is to find a camera that has a snow or beach mode. An example of what this can ...


11

This is basically noise, but from several different mechanisms. Consider the extreme amplification of small details you had to apply to get this picture. There are several distinct source of noise here. The overall graininess is random noise from individual sensels. This is going to happen. Every sensor has some finite random noise added to whatever ...


10

Another possibility is if you were using a filter, such as a UV filter, to take this shot, this can sometimes cause effects such as this when light sources are involved.


10

EV is a measure of illuminance, which is defined in the link you provided as "luminous flux incident on a surface, per unit area". You are correct in stating that when if you keep field of view, depth of field and subject brightness constant: Ev_crop = Ev_ff x c² however since: Area_crop = Area_ff / c² and Light(total) = EV x Area we arrive at ...


10

This is simply a problem of dynamic range. When the overall scene is evenly exposed (in this case, slightly underexposed), the light itself is too bright for the range of your sensor. Assuming that you want both the light and the dial to be apparent in the scene (an assumption I make because you say you want to see it as you see through your eyes), you can ...



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