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9

I think you really need more light. Don't be afraid to pump up the wattage there, you can use shutter speed and aperture to effect the exposure. My setup is fairly similar: But the lights on the side are very bright and the softbox on top is even more so (it's a Westcott cheapie continuous light). That light is bright enough to really take the shadows ...


7

Getting a white background (or black background, or just about any other background effect) is about lighting the background and the subject separately. So my advice is: Dump the lightbox - it simply isn't a good fit for white background photography (too small and doesn't let you light the background). Get a cheap flash like the YN-460 (about $40) + some ...


7

There are plenty of light tents on the market that would suit your needs: Light Tent - Google Shopping If you want to go the DIY route, your best bet is to choose a decent piece of diffusion material (thin plastic / acrylic are good for this) and make a tall three sided pyramid and fire the flash through the diffusion material for even lighting, see: ...


6

Adobe Lightroom does all of the above (apart from the VirtueMart part, sorry!). Tethering (for Canon, Nikon and Leica) and your first four wishlist items are supported right out of the box. The CSV export feature can be added with Timothy Armes' brilliant LR/Transporter plugin.


5

I'm not sure if there is actually enough light coming from those lights to really get things across. Aside from possibly needing brighter lights, you are also getting highlights on the plastic off of the spots where the light isn't diffused enough and it is reflecting in to the camera. Try playing with the angle of the lights and possibly moving them such ...


5

5400 is a reference to the temperature, not the amount of light. In general continuous lighting will not be as powerful as strobe lighting will be. You still need not only more light, but an additional light on the back of the box to raise the exposure of the background in relation to the product so that you can intentionally blow the white background ...


4

It's not trivial to calculate from scratch the amount of light required (as you have no idea how much is absorbed, reflected etc. and it will vary according to how the lights are positioned). What you can do, is find out what shutter speed your camera meter is suggesting currently and work it out from there. You'll want to aim for 1/2f where f is the focal ...


4

They are called "light boxes", like for example this one from Hama. In german it's "leuchtpult": same page on the german site


4

You've got a couple of problems here. The highlights on the product are already blown out in places, yet the background isn't white at all, but more of a light grey color. If you want a lighter (whiter) background your going to have to put more light on the background and less directly on the product. Then when you take the picture expose for the product, ...


3

Unless you are on really good terms with your beer shop, I would have thought they would have frowned on you photographing dozens of beer bottles in their store without paying for them. Why not take the bottles home and use a non-portable setup? If you are on really good terms with your beer shop that they may be happy with you returning them (rather than ...


2

Something to view film transparencies on? If I understand what your asking, I know them as Light Boxes, or possibly Light Tables. I think light box is a pretty well known term for it, given that the term "light box" has also been used for years to refer to the digital variety on the web...those javascript API's that dim a web site and pop up a photo in a ...


2

Here are some things that will lend professionalism to your images. The images are high-quality. The focus is optimal. The noise is minimal. The contrast is optimal with pure neutral highlights and no overall colour cast. The exposure is perfect*. You are shooting a portrait of the product, in effect. You want the subject to look attractive. The subject ...


2

Your images both look underexposed. If you want to blow out the background with the setup you have, I'd start with the first setup, with lights on either side, and block the front half of each side of the lightbox so that most of the light coming through is in the back half so the background is lit more than the product. To light the product you may need ...


1

You may find useful this wikipedia page You can calculate the exposure value with the given formula: EV = log2(N^2 / t) setting: N = the f-number (aperture) you will use t = the exposure time you will use they both depends on your camera: search a middle aperture for your lens and a time you will likely use (a rule of thumb is that the slower time ...


1

Lightbox and "transparency viewer" seem to work the best as terms on Ebay. Write lightbox as a single word for best results (not "light box"). Unfortunately, there is one word to describe two different photographic things, so it's not a perfect search.


1

Light boxes are also a term used for traditional animation, so you may be seeing some of these come up as well. They're basically the same thing as a light table, but it generally has an insert at the top and bottom for a peg bar. Here is one by a company that makes those same types of lightboxes, but is better suited for what you're looking for (and it's ...



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