Before the rush

Before the rush
by evan-pak

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1

The key difference between these two lenses is the fact that one is a zoom lens, and the other is a prime lens. Prime lenses usually offer better optical performance, at the same focal lengths, than a zoom lens. The aperture is denoted by the f-number, and the 35 has a larger aperture, denoted by it's smaller f-number, i.e., 1.8. A larger aperture gives ...


-4

There are many manufacturers of 4/3 cameras; some have interchangeable lenses with others, but not all. There are several different lens mounts. The designation 4/3 is about the sensor size.


1

Both lenses are better for concert photography. It just depends on what type of concert it is, what the lighting conditions are, what your position is in relation to the performers, and most importantly, what you want the shot to look like. There is a huge difference between a mid-day performance at an outdoor festival, an arena event with full theatrical ...


8

You can mix & match lenses from different manufacturers, with just a few caveats. Autofocus will work for all MFT lenses on all MFT bodies (that I am aware of). Image stabilization: Olympus does in-body image stabilization (IBIS), whereas Panasonic bodies prior the GX7 and GX8 placed the image stabilization in the lens.† This means that Olympus lenses ...


4

A Canon 50mm f/1.8 prime lens is quite decent for taking portraits from close proximity. The Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8 is a wide-angle lens and would give you significant results when taking the picture of the concert hall from a distance. Both lenses have their own pros for concert photography. The 50mm f/1.8 has the added advantage of taking good quality ...


0

It is known problem with this objective. Check out this review for measurements and samples for the stock objective. Here is a more expensive one which does not exhibit this defect (made for Minolta A mount but adapted to NEX for testing): http://www.photozone.de/sony_nex/730-sony1650f28?start=2 . It seems that some design properties are causing this ...


1

Your 18-55mm Nikon kit lens has 52mm threads (at least the current version of the Nikon 18-55mm kit lens does). This should be indicated on the front of the lens by a mark that looks something like this: Ø52 Your 55-250mm lens probably also has 52mm threads. This should be indicated by a mark on the front of the lens that looks like: Ø52. I have found some ...


1

First, prefer using a lens hood than a UV filter. You should not need a filter unless in the presence of salt water splashing, flying sand or similar. Second, a lens hood must match the lens, not just to account for its size but also its optical design. An 18-55mm and a 55-200mm may have the same diameter for the hood-mounting bayonet but a hood for the 55-...


4

Everything you need to know you can find at Nikon's site for each of those lenses. AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR II Filter size: 52mm (same for lens cap) Hood: HB-69 Bayonet Lens Hood AF-S DX NIKKOR 55-200mm f/4-5.6G ED VR II Filter size: 52mm (same for lens cap) Hood: HB-37 Bayonet Lens Hood


10

STF stands for "Smooth Transition Focus", and is a Sony-specific* term indicating that the lens includes an apodization filter to create smooth bokeh (out-of-focus blur) — and smooth bokeh is generally considered to be the best bokeh. So, you'd generally use it for non-studio portraiture or in other cases where that blur is an important artistic element. ...


1

TL;DR I am afraid that you need to evaluate the lenses individually. Rangefinder an DSLR lenses are often different in construction because both have different design goals and restrictions. RF lenses are often made to be smaller. RF lenses cannot be used from very close proximity, so no corrections or compromises for very close range are necessary. RF ...


1

As Matt's answer says, this is something typically associated with Zeiss lenses that gets argued about on fredmiranda's alt-gear forum a lot. The theory goes that lenses that exhibit a high degree of "micro-contrast", so that the transition from in focus to out of focus tends to be a little more defined give "the pop" more than lenses that exhibit a high ...


0

The best way to prove it to oneself is to test different lenses using the same scene and lighting. I did a comparison using a mirrorless camera, of a legacy MF prime lens (5 elements) against a modern AF zoom lens (11 elements) and the legacy lens clearly won out. It was especially noticeable in the shadow tones, where there was a clear distinction and ...


2

It will depend a lot on the quality of the adapter you get, but I'd say that it would probably work well enough that if it gives you a significant cost-savings, and you don't mind the possible image quality vagaries of adapting, it's worth trying. As you say, there's no electronic communication to be lost, anyway, and you were already set to manually focus, ...


2

I highly recommend not buying a lens for this wedding (after all, what's more important, using this as an opportunity to build you kit, or ensuring you're delivering a good product to your first customer?), and spending part of that money on renting another identical body, along with one or two lenses for the wedding. Being stuck with a single lens is not ...


5

In the video, Tony is probably referring to DxOMark's Perceptual Megapixel rating that they developed, because as they say, Most of our readers were not looking at MTF graphs While DxOMark hasn't reviewed the DX 18-55mm ƒ/3.5-5.6G VR II lens yet, here are its 2 predecessor reviews, both mounted on the same D3300 that Tony is reviewing: DxOMark ...


2

The resolution of lenses has been deliberated over the years. John William Stutt, 3rd Barron Rayleigh (English scientist Astronomer Royal 1812 – 1842 Nobel Prize 1904). He published the Rayleigh Criterion, the theoretical resolving power of lenses. This study, and method is still valid today. The lens is caused to image ruled lines. The width of the lines ...


4

The answer is that the pentaprism is actually a roof pentaprism. The image is laterally-inverted (left-right inverted) because the image actually bounces an additional time due to the roof of the pentaprism. Pentaprism diagram from Wikipedia: Single-lens reflex camera, CC-BY-3.0


3

The image forming lens flips the image once. For the imaging sensor, there is one flip. The viewfinder is made up of a fold mirror, the one in the mirrorbox of the camera, a focusing screen, and either a pentaprism or two mirrors. The fold mirror flips the image once, restoring it to "normal" parity. This means there are two inversions in a waist-level ...


1

The image forming rays from the camera’s lens are intercepted by a hinged first surface (reflex) mirror set at a 45⁰ angle. This first reflection rights the upside down image, but, being a mirror image, it is reversed right for left. This image is projected onto a viewing screen. The bottom side of this screen has been roughened by scrubbing it with fine ...


-1

A numerical example For years 35mm film cameras dominated. The image size was 24mm by 36mm. let us assume we want a 20mm high image of a 2,0 m high object at a distance u in front of the camera. Provided u is at least 10 times bigger than the focal length f, the ratio of image height to object height is approximately f/u, thus 20mm/2m = f/u, hence ...


0

Simply put, f3.5 - f5.6 is not the full range of apertures available for the lens, it is the largest available aperture depending on what distance the lens is set to. When the lens is set to it's widest zoom option, 18 mm, the largest available aperture is f3.5. When the lens is set to its longest zoom option, 55mm, the largest available aperture ...


1

The comparisons between the EF 16-35mm f/2.8 L II and the EF 17-40mm f/4 are a fairly mixed bag. It may well be that copy-to-copy variation of the same model is just as great as the difference between samples of two different models as tested by a reviewer. You can also throw the much newer EF 16-35mm f4 L into that mix as well. At some focal lengths and ...


0

In some cameras, including entry-level dSLRS, there is a setting to allow shutter release without a lens attached, and in other models full Manual mode allows that. For example, my α35 DLST has a setting to allow the shutter to release without lens. Without a lens, all pictures appear white. But you can prick a small hole in your body cap with a pin ...


0

“Correct” perspective is not critical for most images. Portraiture is an exception. Things close to the camera reproduce large and things far from the camera reproduce small. If the camera is worked in too close, the nose reproduces too large and the ears too small. This is the dreaded facial distortion that makes portraits look weird. Factorial: An image ...


1

I had them and shot them side by side and the 16-35II was hands down better in the ability to clearly resolve and separate details. The color was more lively, too. I think both are great for people photography, but if you want landscapes with perfect sharp corners, you may want to look further. The 17 and 24 T&S lenses are quite good, so are ~20mm ...


2

No. You can only get the same look by standing in the same place. Otherwise, perspective will be altered. Nothing you can do with the lens (or camera) can get around that. On a DX format camera, to get an "85mm look" — the look of an 85mm lens on a "full frame" 35mm-format camera, or FX in Nikon terms — you need a lens that's 1.5× shorter to match field of ...


-2

The SLR (single lens reflex) sets the lens wide-open for composing and focusing. This act delivers the brightest possible viewfinder image. We need this brighter image because the SLR sports a “roof prism” in the viewfinder’s optical path. The roof prism causes the image forming rays to reflect off prism surfaces 5 times. This is necessary to deliver to the ...


5

Nikon has a very noticable lever just inside the lens mount on the left side (viewing the body without the lens from the front). Photo source: Nikon D5000 DSLR: Announced and Previewed On the lens there should be a matching lever. You can move it and see the diaphragm close.


0

In theory, it makes no difference how the lens attained focal ratio 4.8 (f/4.8). However, every lens is constructed via a series of compromises. In other words, the perfect lens, able to yield a faithful image has yet to be made. As to the constant zooms design: The problem is; as the focal length is changed, the size of images of objects is changed. Long ...


4

Typically, the constant aperture zoom would be sharper. The vast majority of lenses get sharper when stopped down, this includes constant aperture zooms and prime lenses too. So when you stop down an F/2.8 lens to F/4.5, let's say, you get would get an image which is very sharp. The variable aperture lens though would be wide-open at some focal-length and so ...


3

All other things being equal, yes — mostly. In terms of exposure and depth of field, they would be as close to functionally equivalent as things get in the real world. The shape of the aperture blades will have some impact, so in some cases you could probably tell by looking closely, even if that were the only difference. But in the real world, those lenses ...


0

After bumping my d610 around on the streets of Paris I've got my Nikkor 28-300 stuck just behind the 70mm mark. I tried forcing it to no avail. I was resigned to shoot the rest of my trip with a lens limited to one quarter of its maximum focal length. Here is what fixed my issue. I detached the lens from the camera body, I turn the zoom ring up to the ...


1

It depends on your level of expertise in judging what lenses you need. If you are a complete beginner who doesn't know what all those letters and numbers on the lens actually mean in practical shooting terms, and you're getting a entry-level dSLR body, then get the 18-55 kit lens (or if you're shooting four-thirds, 14-42 kit lens :-). Knowing what lens to ...


2

The facial deformations you are worried about are due to perspective distortion. Perspective is determined by one thing and one thing only: subject distance. If you take a picture with a 50mm lens on a FF camera from a distance of 10 feet and also take a picture with a 30-35mm lens on an APS-C camera from a distance of 10 feet both pictures will have the ...


0

Any EF or EF-S lens will fit and be fully functional on an EOS Rebel T5i. That includes the EF 85mm f/1.8 lens. 85mm has long been a popular focal length for portraiture and should work very well for tight shots of a couple for an engagement shoot. Just be aware that when mounted on a camera with an APS-C sized sensor the angle of view you will get using an ...


1

The EF 85/1.8 should fit and will work fine for portrait, but on an APS format camera it will require relatively large shooting distance. If you plan shooting in small rooms, walls may prevent you from getting far enough from the photographed person to get enough of their bodies in the picture. 55-250 on a lower end body is definitely not the best ...


1

The Canon T5i can use any lens that is an EF or EF-S mount. The only mount it can't use is the EF-M mount. So to answer the question of being able to use that lens on your camera, Yes you can use the EF 85mm f1.8 USM on the Canon T5i. I cant comment on the quality of the lens as I have never used the lens personally but I suspect it will be decent. You might ...


6

Short answer no - it will be approximately equivalent to the 50mm lens on a full frame camera. What you are referring to are issues of perspective. The perspective is not a property of the lens but is due to the position of the camera relative to the subject. If you are at the same distance from the subject you will get the same perspective no matter what ...


4

Sigma issued an advisory about compatibility with the D5300 in late 2013. They have released firmware updates for lenses that can be upgraded via their USB dock. Unfortunately, the 70-200mm f/2.8 lens is not one of the compatible lenses listed for the USB dock. It appears your lens may not be compatible with the Nikon D5300. Because you can't update the ...


1

What exactly “professional-grade” means in Nikon line of lenses? It means nothing. It means nothing because Nikon doesn't designate certain lenses as "professional grade" and other lenses as "non-professional grade". Anyone outside of Nikon who uses such terms is doing so based on their own arbitrary definition, not on a definition of "professional grade" ...


5

One reason "professional grade" is hard to define is because it's going to get manufacturer's in trouble by setting unreasonable expectations. It's easy, for example, to say that a metal bodied lens is more durable than a plastic composite... but that's not strictly true. The metal body will show dings; the plastic composite won't. The metal body will ...


4

The major manufacturers do not mark lenses as "pro" or "non pro" and they probably have a good reason for that. There are very good professionals that use cheaper "amateur grade" equipment because their back can't handle heavy expensive lenses anymore. There are professional photographers for whom top of the line lenses with latest features are not ...


1

S. I worked in a camera store for many years. I worked on many brands with lots of issues. First off I can't see the camera..."in action", so this is my best educated stab in the dark. I don't believe you have any debris in he lens. The reason is that the lens won't close when it powers down or want to move at all when you do get a obstruction in the lens ...


2

What should I check / examine / investigate to get this working on my 70D? I'd start by cleaning the contacts on the lens. You know that the lens works because it works on a 6D. While it's certainly possible that the lens is completely incompatible with the 70D, one would expect at least some basic functionality if the lens is working at all. Dirty ...


1

Because Canon doesn't license its mount or give the internal details of the electronic communication to third parties, nearly everyone has to reverse engineer the mount communication signals. So this is the main danger of going with a 3rd party lens (particularly an old one)--that when the lens is new, it will communicate properly, but that with older ...


4

I'm surprised AF works with the 6D! That lens was discontinued at least a decade ago. Being that it does work on the 6D, though, it is disappointing that it doesn't also work on the 70D. Both the 6D and 70D use the Digic 5+ processor and were released about 9 months apart in 2012-13 around ten years after the Tokina AT-X 400 AF was last made. It would be ...


0

To rule out an issue with the software - you could check if you run the latest firmware. If not you could update it: http://av.jpn.support.panasonic.com/support/global/cs/dsc/download/ If it is hardware related, it could be that there is dirt or dust in the camera. To get rid of this you could try to get rid of it by blowing compressed air around the lens ...



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