Mist

by Jakub

submit your photo


Hall of Fame
View past winners from this year

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

You don't need anything beyond a lens, body, and a memory card/film. If you are looking to buy more things, look beyond equipment and invest in learning the craft. Books, in person training, and 1 on 1 sessions with more experienced photographers are well worth the price.


1

Let's assume that you were using autofocus and properly focused on the subject (I'm assuming the ship), there are several reasons the image could appear out of focus given the camera was mounted on a tripod. It most likely not a focus issue but a blur issue. There could be several possible reasons for this: There was considerable wind. Wind blowing, even ...


0

My short but sweet answer? You need a body, battery, and lens. The rest is all up to you, your feet, your creativity and determination. Photography is a fantastic creative outlet. It is about you and how you can convey your view of the world through photography. Cameras and lenses are only a tool. The best advice I received when starting out was to buy the ...


0

As mentioned you will need a memory card and thats about it. It is worth it to make sure that your body only comes with a battery (It should but if its used or a strange deal there is always a chance it may not). For a DSLR all you really need is the body, a lens, a battery and a memory card. Yes that pairing is great. I have the D3300 (a great camera). ...


1

If you consider buying a tripod as many have suggested here, then you should also consider buying a wireless remote control for your camera. The tripod is used to eliminate camera movement to allow for long exposure shots or to allow images to be aligned more accurately for doing image processing involving multiple images (e.g. making HDR pictures or doing ...


3

What you'll need depends on what/how you plan to shoot, so waiting until you've had the camera for a while before thinking about buying more stuff for it is probably worth trying. But the things every digital shooter wants in addition to a body/lens or kit to get started is a relatively short list: a computer of some kind. Because, otherwise, how are you ...


2

What you'll need will depend on what you want to shoot. For portraits, you're gonna need ways to control the light. Just about everything you'll need to get started on lighting can be found on Strobist. Landscapes can be improved with a good tripod. Get one that's good and stable because you don't want it falling down and breaking your camera. You'll also ...


6

You will need a memory card — and to just get started, that's basically it. Sometimes a memory card is included in a camera store bundle, but such bundles are usually a bad deal (see Does it make sense getting any of these "extra" lens packages?). As far as I know, a memory card is never included with an interchangeable lens camera or official ...


4

The single best thing you can get after a body, lens and cards is a nice bag. The best camera in the world is no use to anyone on a shelf at home. Steer clear of any that come free with the camera, they're universally ugly and poorly made. Go to some shops and have a play with what's there. Bags are quite a personal item, but you're looking for something ...


1

Here are some suggestions (with sample price from Amazon; look to B&H Photo, as well). You certainly will need memory card(s), and probably a spare battery or two. You also should get a case or protective bag, if you do not have one. A tripod is useful for close-ups, night photography and studio work. There are many types, from inexpensive ones that ...


1

As Hugo says, the amount of effort required to get at the aperture blades varies hugely from lens to lens, with more modern lenses (i.e. autofocus) being typically somewhat more difficult than (for example) most large format lenses, which often don't even require tools. However, to answer your question directly you can often (depending on the lens) do a ...


0

It's hard to say for sure, but if the issue only appears when the lens is mounted on the camera and when it's powered on, it does suggest that the issue is something to do with the electrics in the lens. Have you confirmed that the issue is still occurring with the lens on another camera body? If so, does the speed at which you zoom make any difference - ...


0

Maybe you could get a wide, heavy duty rubber band, and put it over the join on the lens barrel. If it's the right size, then it should provide enough friction to stop it from turning. You could even apply a bit of glue to one half to keep it in place.


1

Perhaps you could use this online calculator to calculate an appropriate lens in your situation. For example, using the calculator, I can see that (on a full-frame/35" sensor) you'll probably need a lens that has a 20" equivalent focal length or less: To get this result I popped 20 feet in the distance input, and guessed at around 20mm for the focal ...


1

What's happening is that the sensor in your phone is (for the sake or argument) 1/10th the width/height of that in a full-frame camera. However, then lens in the phone is 10 times as 'wide' as that of the camera lens. The 2 cancel each other out and give you the same field of view. So you might have a 50mm lens on the camera and a 5mm lens on the phone. If ...


5

I've been shooting high school bands for near a decade now. Your question as asked is hard to answer because there are too many variables you have left out. What type of photos are you after? Wide angle shots with a large portion of the band or closeups of individual members? What will your shooting position be? In the stands (how big is the stadium and ...


1

As agf1997 says, minimum focus distance for macro lenses varies somewhat with lens design, however as a rule of thumb you can expect the minimum focus distance (i.e. minimum working distance) to be roughly the same as the focal length of the lens (assuming 1:1 magnification here). Hence a 300mm lens with a whole lot of extension tubes (as a silly example to ...


3

You're pretty much comparing apples and oranges here - the 24-105 and 70-200 cover very different focal length ranges. You need to get a lens which covers the range of focal lengths you're going to need. That obviously transforms the question into "what focal length do I need?" - and the answer to that depends on where you're going to be standing relative ...


0

I would take a 70-200mm with f/2.8 and image stabilization. It could be like Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM but such lenses are very expensive. Scott Kelby has a lot of articles concerning photography on stadium in his blog. For example: enter link description here


0

If you photograph a Whole band then the 70-200 might be a no go.. You need to know how many people there are and be sure that you dont have to be too far away to get everybody in. So probably the 28-105 is a better option if your choice is between these two. Yesterday i photographed a couple, full body with the 70-200 and had to stay 20 meters away to get ...


3

When a macro lens has a reproduction ratio of 1:1 an object with a given size will be reproduced at the image plane at the same size. This is irrespective of the focal length. The only difference is that a longer focal length will afford you the ability to achieve that reproduction ratio at a greater distance than the shorter focal length. The precise ...


2

The Opteka 6.5mm, Vivitar 7mm, Samyang/Rokinon/Bower/Pro-Optic/Phoenix/Walimex 8mm fisheye lens for dSLRs are all the same lens optically, and are all made by Samyang in Korea. The external differences are going to be in the casing and branding and (obviously) the flange focal distance for the specific mount. And between different mount versions, the ...


0

Performance in terms of acutance of any lens varies in a lot of ways, but throwing in the variable focal lengths a zoom lens is capable of adds to the complexity of things. Even a prime lens with a fixed focal length can vary in terms of center sharpness from one aperture setting to the next. How much that sharpness is degraded from the center to the edges ...


2

No, that's not generally true. You might look at the DxOmark website for actual measurements on different lenses. Sharpness at different points across the field is one of the things measured in great detail, and graphed using color to indicate sharpness. The sharpness varies not only with the specific lens, but varies with the zoom setting on zoom lenses, ...


-1

Landscape and architecture involve (mainly) static objects, this means that you can use a high focal length lens with a small field of view to take pictures and then stitch those pictures together to compile an extremely high resolution picture of the desired object. A telephoto prime lens, like e.g. this one will then be the ideal sort of lens. You then ...


2

Choosing the "next lens" you need should be based upon a particular need that your current lenses are not capable of meeting. So in order to answer the question you must first ask yourself, "What kind of shots do I want to take that I am not able to take now?" Only then can you answer the question, "What lens will allow me to take those shots?"


4

Yes. Stop shopping; start shooting. The lenses you have are what most folks would already choose for landscapes, cityscapes, and street shooting. If you don't know what lens you should "upgrade" to, then chances are good, you're not ready to upgrade. You need more experience with the gear you do have. And it's when a specific frustration starts to eat ...


5

As with any blanket statement, it's not true in every case that primes will give consistent sharpness across the field and zoom lenses won't. To take one specific example, the Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 II has much worse performance in the corners than the centre at f/2.8, whereas the Canon EF 24-70 f/2.8L II USM is pretty consistent across the frame at 50mm, ...


1

I've written one answer, but I'm going to try again with a different approach. Maybe you'll find this more helpful. A prime lens — a lens with no zoom — has a certain fixed focal length. It always shows the same field of view. A zoom lens, on the other hand, can vary over a range of focal lengths, for wider and narrower fields of view. When a zoom lens is ...


0

When the term zoom is used with lenses it simply means that you can change the magnification oft the lens. There are also other lenses which can't be zoomed, they are called prime lenses. The magnification numbers you see in point and shoot cameras are simply a quotient of the largest and smallest focal length oft the lens. Lets assume you have a zoom lens ...


1

The question is one of comparing apples and oranges. Take this analogy: We can determine how strong an animal is by how many times an it can lift/pull it's own weight. That scale suggests we should have been using ants instead of horses to pull carts and work the land... but we know that's not right because we can ride a horse but would definitely crush an ...


1

I used the following formula that helped me better understand the focal magnifications when I went to DSLR’s from digital compacts. First, I decided what I would consider to be a perfect focal range to mimic the human eye. this was a little short of 50mm, but I settled on 50mm. (please do note, that this is only a conceptual attempt to rationalise what ...


1

In colloquial usage "zooming in" on something is to make it appear closer or larger. In technical terms, this is represented by the focal length. Your confusion comes from expecting the zoom ratio (the "times zoom") number to represent the amount of zoom in the colloquial sense, when in photography we use it simply in its technical sense: the amount any ...


0

Lens sharpness is fairly complex topic as there are many variables that dictate what makes an image sharp and what does not. Here I will try and keep it as basic as possible with a just a few areas that can be considered regarding sharpness. It is generally true that Prime Lenses are sharper than Zoom Lenses. The reason for this is due to a prime Lens not ...


-3

Generally yes. A camera lens is composed of many lens elements. Each element bends light in a different way. Some elements need to be made of a different material that bends some colors more or less than others (especially at the edges). It is difficult to manufacture elements that are of unusual shapes (aspherical) or that require much finer tolerance. A ...


1

The softness is probably from the 2x teleconverter and the glass in the FD->EOS adapter. That's actually like stacking two teleconverters, since most of these adapters that use a glass element to help you achieve focus to infinity are simply short teleconverters. Teleconverters nearly always add softness, and while they do increase the focal length, they ...


1

The most likely culprit for fuzzy images when using this lens combination is the glass you will find in your FD-EOS adapter. The low quality glass that is often used greatly degrades and softens the image. If you are using a glassless adapter then the fuzziness could be caused by the lack of infinity focus. This is due to the differences in old FD and new ...


0

There are no such adapters, because the Leica M lenses have a registration distance that would put the lens inside the Canon's body if you wanted to achieve focus to infinity. Canon's mount distance from the sensor is roughly twice that of a Leica M's mount from the sensor/film plane. The distance the lens is held is part of the mount system design and is ...


5

Canon manufactures no lenses in the USA. The "US" versions of each Canon lens model are made in the same plant that all of the rest of that same lens model is produced and are physically identical within a particular production run. To the best of my knowledge, all Canon EOS lenses have the country where they are assembled printed on either the front or rear ...


3

This is not possible. The flange distance of M mount is 27.8mm while EF mount is 44mm. The lens would function as an extreme macro lens only on EF mount, so no one makes Leica M to Canon EF adapters.


-1

From what I find all Canon lenses are manufactured in Japan. You can check this web site to check where exactly and when they are manufactured Second source


1

The high pitched squeak you are hearing, is most likely coming from the AF motors in the Lens. Nikon budget and kit lenses have been known for this issue for many years. From what I know, very rarely do these squeaks actually affect the AF performance and in the over whelming majority of cases, people have lived with these squeaks for years and just become ...


0

It is a little complicated as field stops values might be different so you be comparing apples to oranges. In general your focal length is like a radius so a lens that is 18- 55 millimeter change in focal length would have a 3.05 change in radius. Allowing that the 18 mm to be your reference picture, if you then adjusted to 55 mm you would be taking a ...


-1

It is a Minolta mount! Have a Look at the rear cap of this lens. (If you still have) There you should see "For ..."


8

This is the first, "zebra" version, optically the same design as Pancolar 2.0/50. The aperture control switch ("tumbler") should have 2 positions, "A" is counter-clockwise when looking at the front element, "M" is clockwise when looking at the front element - not 3 positions. The rear part of the lens should have an actuator pin that, when pressed, makes the ...


1

This isn't a definative answer, but a speculation and something for you to check that's too long for a comment. I'd be surprised if the lever had a visible effect. Try turning the focus and f-stop rings at the different positions and see if there is a difference in feel or motion range. I have a pre-war Carl Zeiss Jena 50mm lens that has a separate ring ...


-1

Naaa This is the Sigma SA mount. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sigma_SA-mount which is like a cross between the pentax K mount (mechanically) and the canon mount (electronically)


1

Lens Manufacturers such as Sigma and Tamron make the same lens for various different camera manufacturers, however, each lens mount is different and is dedicated exclusively to that camera manufacturer. In other words, if you wish to purchase a Sigma 18-200mm Lens for a Canon, then you need to buy a Sigma Lens with a Canon Mount I.E- EF or EF-S Fit. The ...


4

I think you've got a Minolta A-mount lens. Compare to this photo (image borrowed from here): Minolta and Konica merged at some point and were subsequently acquired by Sony, and this mount is apparently still used by Sony as the "Alpha mount system".


0

I'm the author of the article posted here previously: http://samluyk.com/homemade-petzval-bokeh/ If you have a fast lens, create a circular cover over it, and it should swirl the background. It's best seen with foliage: https://www.flickr.com/photos/samluyk/19365820681



Top 50 recent answers are included