It's a bird

by Vian Esterhuizen

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1

No. There are several problems here. This lens looks a lot like the Senko 50mm f/0.95, i.e., it is a C-mount lens for 1" format video. This lens vignettes even on micro four-thirds (2x crop). There's no way the image circle will cover an APS-C or full-frame camera, and the registration distance is much much smaller than that of Nikon F. In order to get the ...


1

No, because the register (distance from the mounting flange of the lens to the sensor plane) is quite short.


1

Smaller format lenses are eased by having lower maximum image heights and smaller fields of view at the same focal length. Each aberration has explicit field dependencies which describe the rate at which they grow. For the following equations, y is the ray height at the lens and h is image height. Spherical Aberration varies by y3. Coma varies by y2h. ...


1

For Canon, the EF-S was designed to precicely scale down the geometry of EF by the crop factor. SO, the EF-S 17-55 f/2.8 gets its design kick-started by shrinking down the existing design for ... well, they don't make a EF 27-88, so not the clearest example. But I have read that some designs are scaled down. IAC, the rather large 17-55 is 1.6× smaller ...


1

Sigma 18-35mm f/1.8 DC HSM A Is a lens that I do not own. I thought that it fits your requirements rather well, hence I suggest looking into it. It is wide angle and very fast. How fast are your subjects relative to you? If you are on the same boat, you should be fine. I mention that because sometimes Sigma lenses have trouble with autofocus. You should ...


0

If you are looking for equipment to shoot short films with, you may want to put maximum priority on auto-focus and smooth focusing. For example, if you need good focus tracking and not jerky focusing, you need a good body and also a good lens, preferably STM lens. If you plan on using wide angles mostly, like within 18-35mm range, then focusing will not ...


1

You should create your own custom profiles for the inverted lenses.


1

Aperture is a bit of a misnomer; a hold-over from simpler times and simpler lens designs. What matters is the entrance pupil, or the apparent size of the aperture as viewed through the front (business end) of the lens. With a simple lens design (a double-Gauss or Tessar, for instance), the physical aperture and the entrance pupil are approximately the same ...


1

From what I've researched the only real difference is how close you have to be to your object to take the pictures. It's true that the 100mm lens lets you shoot from twice the distance as the 50mm lens and get a similar composition. That's because the angle of view for a 50mm lens is twice that of a 100mm lens. But the composition won't be exactly the ...


6

The 50mm f/2.5 Compact Macro lens is not a "true" macro lens. It does not magnify 1:1 (i.e., 1:1 means that the size of the image on the sensor is the same as the actual size of the object); it only magnifies 1:2.5. So, it doesn't let you get as close as a true macro lens like the EF 100mm f/2.8L IS USM Macro. In addition, the design's a lot older. It was ...


1

Another difference is that the 50mm isn't a true macro lens since it doesn't let you reach a 1:1 scale. The 100mm can also be used as a short telephoto but otherwise, you might be better off getting a Canon EF-s 60mm f2.8.


6

The 1200mm lens you cite is something of an aberration, since it's built-to-order, not a general-market lens — see Why are some big telephoto lenses so expensive compared to telescopes? and Why are some lenses so expensive?. But the general rule holds true: lenses for DSLRs and most mirrorless cameras are gigantic compared to those in superzoom cameras. ...


2

The Canon lens has focal length of 1200mm and maximum aperture of f/5.6, whereas the Nikon lens has a focal length (at the long end) of 357mm and maximum aperture of f/6.5. So the Canon lens is longer and has a faster aperture, which requires a larger front element, 214mm vs 55mm. This is a substantial difference and makes the Canon larger, heavier and more ...


0

The simple and fast explanation is the lens on Nikon camera is created for sensor with size 1/2.3". Canon lens is created for fullframe camera (24x36 mm sensor). This is very huge difference, crop factor is something like 6. To project the same amount of light on the big sensor you need big lenses inside compared to much small sensor. And with the rise of ...


-2

Fixed maximum aperture lenses don't really have any advantage, and they never did. If you want an aperture that you can maintain throughout the entire zoom range you can just select one that is available at all zoom settings. An f/3.5-f/5.6 lens will stay at 5.6 no matter how much you zoom. Fixed maximum aperture basically come in two variations; High ...


1

Automatic zoom feature would require an information link between camera operator and camera itself because in most cases the operator knows the best what zoom level is desired at the moment.


1

You will get this message if the lens barrel is locked; push the lock/unlock button on the lens. Then extend the lens a bit, and that might take care of the problem---at least it did for me!


0

The 18-55 VR II (the current collapsible model) is a very fine lens optically, but in a cheap barrel. It easily outperforms the 12-24 at 24mm on DX when correctly focussed. If the autofocus works for you, it will outperform the 18-35. Wide angle lenses are difficult to manually focus - you will at least need an eyepiece magnifier. The D3200 does indeed have ...


2

The problem you are experiencing is due to the way third party lens makers usually design their lenses to be compatible with cameras made by someone else: they reverse engineer them to work on the existing offerings of the camera maker at the time they design the lens. If the manufacturer later updates their system the original manufacturers have access to ...


1

I have that camera. My top lens choice for that camera is the pancake 20mm. It's the only lens that I always take with me and spends most time on the camera. It's such a fast lens, so sharp, and I've not felt limited by the focal length very much. One example of a situation where this focal length is limiting is when visiting a zoo, you can't get in ...


0

The farther the subject, the smaller the part of the field of view it will cover. Therefore the picture of the object will be composed of less pixels which means that the image will effectively be less sharp.


1

Remember, Nikon 70-300 (1.5x costlier than the 55-300 option) is also a FX lens and hence it can be treated as future investment. Tomorrow, when you invest in a FX body like D750 or D810, you can easily use 70-300 but not the 55-300 or 55-200 I have both the Nikon versions, the 55-200 and 70-300, and so can stress upon the fact that VR is a must when it ...


0

As a partial answer, I'd like to point out that it could be short-sighted to only look for the image quality. As a still photographer, I can work with a gripped old DSLR that looks like a brick, is about as heavy and was mistaken for a bag in the past. That's because it hangs of my shoulder and my arms rarely have to carry it. But can you hold that heavy ...


0

There are lots of lens review sites but also lots of factors for regarding lenses as "good". For example for serious video minimal focus breathing, constant aperture (if a zoom) and being parfocal are big plusses, less so for casual shooting. For hand-held video stabilisation is a big plus. For stills there is sharpness but there is also colour fringing ...


1

I think there are two very basic reasons why DoF scales are no longer put on lenses: zoom and autofocus. Zoom lenses would have to have dynamic DoF scales that would change for whatever focal length is set on the lens. While maybe this could be done with, say, eink or lcd displays, it's something that's never really been put on lenses before. But the more ...


0

In general STM lenses have quieter and smoother focus than their non-STM counterparts, especially compared to USM lenses. If you are shooting video with 2012 or newer EOS body (from the 650D onward) then this is a distinct advantage. If you are shooting stills then the typically faster focus speed of the non-STM lens is more of an advantage. In the case of ...


0

Jumping from phone photo to DSLR is a little much. I would recommend instead going to a high end point and shoot and shoot in manual mode to learn what all those things do, then switch to DSLR and lens combo with capabilities specific to what you found lacking in your point and shoot. Photography have specific gear needed for different photos. Do you want ...


0

STM is really only useful for video. If you have no interest in video then there's not much value in the STM feature itself. However, you may want to look into the quality of the STM lens vs the the non STM lens. STM itself doesn't contribute to image quality, but is part of the naming convention and these are two different lenses with different optical ...


3

First, a word about what depth-of-field is and is not: In a way, depth-of-field is an illusion. There is only one plane of focus. Everything in front of or behind the point of focus is out of focus to one degree or another. What we call DoF is the area where things look, to our eyes, like they are in focus. This is based on the ability of the ...


-4

Most of the answers above are misleading. A Canon APC sensor has a crop factor of 1.6 which effectively changes the focal length by 1.6, therefore a 100mm lens has an effective length of 160mm. A simple exercise is to use the same lens on two difference bodies, one full frame and one cropped and you will instantly see the difference. You cannot use a full ...


4

Not including a DOF scale can make the lens barrel smaller and allows the use of different focusing mechanisms such as linear motors instead of the traditional helicoid (which is where the DOF scale used to be printed). It is less important to have the scale as you can get instant feedback on what is and isn't in focus with a digital camera, and differences ...


0

From what I have read and and seen about aspherical lenses, they are designed to prevent aberration of light hitting the surface of the lens. This means, it prevents image distortion for the person wearing the lenses. This is accomplished by making the edges of the lens curve out, away from the curve of the spherical design of the lens, making it a sphere in ...


1

Your lens is damaged. One of your images (shown below) exhibits an abnormal amount of spherical aberration. It is not the kind of softness you would get when out of focus. Also, notice that the bricks on the left side are significantly softer than the right side, which indicates decentering. Both of these indicate that one or more lens elements have been ...


3

There's an obvious difference between "good" and "great" glass at 20mp, surely it's even more obvious at 50mp. The problem is regarding resolution as some binary thing—it resolves or it doesn't. The reality is that contrast at a given resolution is what really matters. The point at which it goes from 10% MTF* to 0% MTF—extinction resolution or maximum ...


11

It's most likely a commercial decision based upon cost and performance. Let's take your prime at f/1.2 example. Canon makes a number of 50mm lenses. The EF 50mm f/1.8 II is about $100. It has 6 elements in 5 groups, 5 aperture blades and a plastic barrel. It takes a 52mm filter and weighs 130g. The EF 50mm f/1.4 USM is about $350. It has 7 elements in 6 ...


3

The main difference between a DSLR and a mobile phone camera is not the lens, but the sensor. The sensor in a typical consumer DSLR is around about 24 x 16 mm, but that in a typical smartphone (the iPhone 6) is around 4.8 x 3.6 mm - or in other words, the DSLR sensor is around 22 times larger than that in a smartphone. As Matt has answered, the lenses in a ...


5

The lenses in mobile phones are typically made from molded plastic elements rather than ground glass elements, and these are in optically inferior to glass in general (higher dispersion, lower refractive indices). However molded elements have a big advantage in that they can be made into absolutely any shape, whereas glass is very difficult to grind into ...


0

How long is a piece of string? Over the years, I have only had to have one lens repaired, and one lens serviced. The former was dropped on to steel shuttering, shearing the camera mount and the lens mount; the other needed servicing after using it as my only lens for a 6 week trip in continually dusty conditions in Mongolia. I was being careful with this ...


0

I have a Canon EF 70-200 2.8L IS USM lens for my high school photography students. Just one, so it was used at least 2-3 times a week 8+ months a year in the trembling hands of a teenager who had been told it cost $2,000 so they better treat it like a princess. They weren't rough, but they're still a little foolish. It lasted about seven years before the AF ...


4

It reminds me of one of my FD mount lenses where you pull\push to adjust focal length, rotate to adjust focus, and then there is the aperture ring for...well adjusting the aperture. I don't quite understand what you mean when you say 'swipe' through the aperture settings. It is a variable aperture so, when it is at 205mm it has an aperture of 4.8 as ...


1

It sounds like you might have damaged the 18-55 lens by twisting on the "wide angle" lens when your 18-55mm lens was set to autofocus. The force of twisting the screw-on "wide angle' adapter onto your lens with the focus motor connected may have damaged your lens' focus motor to the point it can no longer focus on distant objects when the wide angle lens is ...


4

You want to contact Sigma and find out if they'll still rechip the lens. Given the age of the lens and the fact that you're not the original owner, they may not be able to rechip it, or might charge for it, but it's worth a shot--the worst they can do is say no. Third party lens makers typically reverse engineer the electronic communication between the ...


-2

Have you got the latest firmware for the camera? If not, try updating it. http://www.canon.dk/support/consumer_products/products/cameras/digital_slr/eos_40d.aspx?type=firmware


0

Assuming both the lenses cast light circles at least large enough to cover the entire sensor, an f/1.4 lens will always be faster than an f/1.7 lens by almost one half stop. The aperture size has nothing to do with the size of the image circle a lens casts. The elements of a lens behind the aperture diaphragm and how much they bend the light allowed through ...



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