Butterfly

by Rodrigo

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0

Your lens has a Sony/Minolta A-Mount so the question becomes: Are there adapters for A-Mount to Canon EOS and/or Nikon F? And the answer is yes, they do exist (Canon, Nikon) but only with correction lenses for infinity-focus. You should study that well, it usually means reduced quality. The 2 cameras you mention have APS-C size sensors so it will have ...


0

I am new to this site, but am well-versed in photog so this is a great match. First, you have a wonderful camera and lens to begin with. I'm Nikon all the way now, but used the 5d Mark2 and the 17-40L for my wide-angle shots when I was a Canon owner. Now, they've come out with many better lenses. Personally, for true landscape shots I'd never suggest ...


0

M4/3 kit lenses aren't expensive. Once you look at "specialized" lenses, then it becomes more expensive, but it is my experience that M4/3 lenses can be affordable. Like others said, the EF-S 50mm 1.8, and also Nikkor 50mm 1.8D are "anomalies". I have managed to collect some micro four thirds lenses, in addition to the body, and it did not end costing me ...


2

No, it works the other way around. The main measure to know is the flange distance. This is the distance between the mount and sensor on a camera. Lenses for a particular mount are designed for exactly that distance. If a lens would be mounted with the wrong flange distance it would not be able to achieve focus for more than a very short distance, usually a ...


0

Today I received a Sigma Zoom-K III 75-210 and I tested it with my Nikon D5100. Automatic modes don't work but it works in manual mode without a problem. First test shots just great, details super - well you must know how to handle not only the manual mode but also the lens setting! I am curious how the macro mode will behave.


6

When looking for a wide angle lens you should consider a few very important things: Focal length Image Quality Maximum Aperture Focus modes (AF/MF) Filter compatibility Feature set (FTM, IS, USM, etc.) Mount Weight, size, cost, etc. Intended usage Distortion & Projection Flare resistance Most of the above is not uniquely important to wide angle ...


1

What you know is wrong. You cannot adapt lenses to Nikon F easily without modifying a lens mount. The Nikon F mount has one of the largest registration distances of all the old film SLR mounts. Unless you have €100 or so to spend on a Leitax kit, but most of the lenses those will fit are going to cost you decidedly more than €200 if they're in ...


3

The reason you can't adapt E-mount lenses to your A-mount camera is the same reason you can't adapt rangefinder lenses to a dSLR--the flange distance. The flange distance is the distance from the image plane that the lens is held by the lens mount. This distance is specific to each mount system, and must be maintained for a lens to focus through its full ...


4

Unfortunately unless you can fix the problem yourself, the repair will likely end up around as (or even more) expensive as a second hand lens of the same type. The 18-55 mm kit lenses are abundant since they come with the kits that people getting into DSLR photography are buying. When they upgrade their lenses they sell these lenses at low prices.


0

If the mark is on the rear element it may cause additional flare in the lens. You won't notice it except when taking photographs toward a bright light source in or near the field of view. In any case though the number of lens surfaces in this design is probably quite large (it's a zoom lens!) so one would expect some flare in any case. Should this ...


1

@Scott Reed I have the same lens in Nikon F100. In my camera I have always set aperture to f22 in order to be able to set the aperture from the camera. Try to lock the lens in f22. Which exactly 50mm lens, do you have? Nikkor 50mm 1.8G or nikkor 50mm 1.8D? I am guessing that you have 1.8D which came without auto-focus motor. Moreover, neither the lens nor ...


0

I'd just get one of the tele primes. The Olympus 45mm f/1.8 or 75mm f/1.8 are great little lenses. Just carrying one (like the 75mm) in your pocket let's you swap longer without carrying too much gear and gives you a way faster lens than zoom types ever do.


3

The fisheye "effect" is dependent only on the angle between the camera and subject, it is thus totally independent of distance. What you might be noticing is that a fisheye lens bends all straight lines unless they pass through the exact centre of the image. In some natural scenes the horizon will be the only straight line in the image, thus if you happen ...


-4

Zeiss is a brand of best quality lenses. I was amazed at quality pictures from a Lumia 720 smartphone with Zeiss lens. It takes such incredibly beautiful pictures with only 6.7 MP Carl Zeiss optics! Then I took a Blackberry Z30 with normal 8 MP camera. Pictures were so dark and noisy. For sure, in the future I will choose a smartphone with Zeiss!


4

Kipon make tilt shift adapters for SLR lenses with various mirrorless mounts. I have an Olympus OM -> E mount tilt shift adapter from them. Olympus's OM SLR lenses are incredibly compact, so pairing one with a NEX body gives a very compact tilt-shift package. Here are some examples of the adapter on an A7R with 21mm and 50mm OM lenses: With the A7R ...


-2

You have to consider that all "L" lenses are built for full-frame cameras, not for APS-C cameras like the 600D. The 70-200mm have to be multiplied by the crop factor which is 1.6 (equals a range from about 110mm to 320mm).


4

Options The NeinGrenze 5000T point and shoot digital camera is probably the smallest option out there. It is specifically for selective focus to achieve the "miniature effect" and is not going to give you full control of either tilt or shift, although it has some tilt control I guess. Another option would be a Lensbaby lens such as the Composer Pro. Again ...


5

As a rule of thumb, if the lens comes with a tripod ring, you hold the lens with a camera attached rather than the typical holding the camera with the lens attached. If you have a heavy lens and try to hold it up with the camera it could put extra stress on the mount.


2

The most suitable lens of your kit is the one that took the best/most promising images when you scouted the rail road track location beforehand. The first image has an interesting background with buildings and a bridge in addition to the railroad. It adds to the image. A wider lens can include more of the background and the surroundings. The second one ...


6

I think you'll be best off with the 24-70mm zoom. You're going to want a smaller aperture than f/1.8 anyway -- at 10 feet, the 85mm set to f/1.8 will give you only a few inches of depth of field. Your example images have a lot more DOF than that. Using the zoom will give you a lot more flexibility with respect to focal length, and also let you change focal ...


0

The 810 is going to challenge every bit of glass you own, and my advice is to get the best you can or you'll find yourself trading up later. I think you'll find that the 70-300 will have a hard time keeping up. Let me recommend a few secondhand alternatives: 80-200 f/2.8D AF-D and AF-S. These are the last two of a family of workhorses that was first ...


2

The name is Ken. Not Simon. The quote from the article feels like "oh hey, he mentioned an 85 and I do have an 85, too, so this must be totally the same situation...", but it's not. If you are looking for non-studio places like [...] a graffiti wall in a street as backgrounds, will a more tele lens be helpful? I doubt it. Basically speaking, the ...


1

I tend to look up a-mount lenses on http://www.dyxum.com/lenses/. For instance, here is information on the Minolta 24 mm: http://www.dyxum.com/lenses/Minolta-AF-24mm-F2.8_lens9.html. Each lens page has references to internal and external reviews.


0

If you had a finer grid, you could measure the object using the image of the ruler, even if it's seen in a fun-house mirror. If the cm marks are 1t pixels apart on one end and 8 px apart on the other end, it's no sweat if you count N actual marks in the image across the object. If you don't have the ruler adjacent to the object, but measure various featues ...


-3

In my opinion they don't produce the same result. Here is the comparison. Imagine you using a macro tube. One optical element is moved away from the sensor to create magnification. What occurs here is you loose quality. Light is a dispersing medium over distance if ever so slight. You lose that slight to dispersion on the distance. Also your angle is ...


-1

I took the opportunity to simply go for it and do it. I placed the camera (40D, being APS-C) in the same position, that is, the body is the same distance from the subject in both shots. (I'm on a slow network, so I upload only the embedded previews from the raw files) The first one, with an EF-S zoom lens dialed to "50" The second one with a 50mm EF lens ...


0

The 28-105 is a very convenient lens, but I found the image quality disappointing in the extreme. I had been using 35mm f/2 and 50mm f/1.8 primes on my Canon but I wanted the convenience of both a wider range of focal lengths and the ability to zoom. But I was so disappointed with the 28-105 image quality that I am back to using my primes. The corners and ...


5

The Nikkor (i.e., Nikon-made) 55-300 is an AF-S lens and should autofocus on your Nikon D3300. Why you think it's manual focus only, I'm not sure. If the lens is a Nikon-made one, but designated as AF, that doesn't mean it's manual-focus only--just that it will only autofocus on a body with a focus motor. You'd need to get a D7x00 or higher end Nikon body ...


6

Does mounting an EF vs an EF-S lens produce the same results on a camera body that has an APS-C frame size? Yes. They will produce the same results, assuming all the same settings, and similar optical performance between the two lenses, and 100% accuracy in the actual focal length of the lens as reported (manufacturers have been known to fudge the ...


4

The answer is yes. 50mm focal length is 50mm focal length, no matter what the mount is.



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