Lightnings taking a ride

by ceinmart

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1

I also have a D10 which I use when kayaking, so I'm very interesting in the answer to this (though I don't have a good one). I have wiped off the drops with a handkerchief while out in the kayak - the only soft dry cloth I had available at the time, though not ideal. A small bit of lens cleaning cloth or microfibre would probably be better...perhaps I could ...


0

Tried rainex? used on car screens and you can run without wipers


1

A mark this noticeable would have to be on either the rear element, or more likely, the sensor, as was said in another answer. Dust is most harmful to image quality at locations within the optical system where the image is "created" and projected; the rear element of the lens and the sensor respectively. Light is more tightly converged at these locations, ...


5

It seems likely that there is a hair, eyelash, or other small artifact on the sensor. Something on the lens is unlikely to show up like this (it'd be too out of focus). You may be able to simply blow it off — don't use your mouth, and definitely don't use compressed air, but a quality "rocket blower" (with an intake filter) should do it. Put your camera into ...


2

Absolutely, there is a drop in quality as the zoom-ratio increases. This is normal because the designers have to made compromises when placing lens elements. This gives a performance which is uneven too. Many times you can have decent sharpness at one end of the zoom and it will truly terrible at the other end or somewhere in the middle. The other thing is ...


1

The only decrease in quality will be the likely performance difference between the Full Frame and APS-C sensor. In general FF lenses used on APS-C cameras perform slightly better than when used on FF cameras because the edges of the light circle cast by the lens, where most of the weaknesses of a lens are most obvious, are cropped off by the smaller sensor. ...


0

You will need an adapter. I don't know what brand your 'old camera' was, but if it was 35mm, then you will need to use the lens in manual mode on your D5100. Autofocus, aperture or shutter priority, program mode, will be non-functional. I am using my old Minolta MD lenses on an Olympus E-1 DSLR with very satisfactory results. I bought adapters on Ebay - ...


0

Pentax 50mm has the nicest bokeh and sharpness I've ever see... I think you've answered your question. Stick with image quality over anything else. You can always make up for other deficiencies with skill and technique. Shoot for best image quality.


1

If you are going to make mostly portraits, a 50mm prime would fit you much better. Not only gives you a lower aperture, but the image quality is better with primes. Don't worry about the "ideal" 70-90mm range, 50mm is a classic focal length for portraits.


1

Between those three you have listed, I would go with 50mm one. If I wanted to pick one myself, prime, non-zoom...I would pick 35mm. It is better for street photography. If I wanted to pick one, zoom and affordable range I would go with 24-85mm if Canon has it, for a higher price 24-70 f2.8 is a good walk around lens.


1

Although, buying a first lens can be considered a subjective decision, you can make this decision easier by deciding on how far you wish to take your photography. Are you buying a DSLR and Lens to improve your skills in composition along with the quality of your photos or are you looking for a camera with a lens that provides the versatility of not just ...


3

Basically you can divide lenses (or just about anything really) into 3 categories: Lenses that are really good for one thing and one thing only (or a small set of things) Lenses that are not great at anything but are ok for a lot of things Lenses that cost a fortune (and still can't do everything) Now, since you are a newbie I assume option 3 is out of ...


4

I fixed this in the sources of Lensfun. It will be part of the next release. Until then, you can edit the file mil-panasonic.xml, probably in /usr/share/lensfun. Search for "12-32" in that file, and expand the lens model name to "Lumix G Vario 12-32mm F3.5-5.6 Asph. Mega OIS".


0

The 18-105mm has a filter size of 67mm. So you need a 67mm polarising filter.


1

I know this is an old question, but I found it while searching for the same answer. My homeowners or renters insurance won't cover rented equipment. Neither will the benefits on any of my credit cards. So far, my options are to go uninsured, which requires me to provide a credit card that up to the entire value of the rented equipment can be charged to ...


0

This is an old question but for reference there are two additional factors to consider: 1) Sample variation between lenses. Just as performance may vary somewhat between lenses even of the same type and manufacturer so too may color. 2) Assuming other factors equal, such as monitor calibration, some people will perceive color differences imparted by a lens ...


0

Use 50mm if you want to separate the person from the bacground, you can always crop the image to simulate the 70mm (at 8Mpix) or 90mm (at 5Mpix). To include enviroment use 17-50/2.8 at smaller focus distances. And take telezoom for larger distances. You may found usefull to experiment with http://camerasim.com/apps/camera-simulator/


1

For an f/2.8 lens, it is not really necessary. f/2.8 is a fast lens and you can use higher shutter speeds. For an f/4 lens, it might be useful in some situations. An f/4 lens is a medium speed lens and can require shutter speeds slower than desired. This is why Canon has IS on their f/4 lenses and not on their f/2.8 lenses ("L" Series).


2

I think the question is mainly about performance of various lenses. Set at 18mm your 18-105 will shoot the same field of view as the 18-55 set at 18mm. However that does not mean the pictures will come out the same. Generally speaking the 18-55 is a sharp lens across the range it servers (I dont own an 18-105 so I cant really comment). A lot of people really ...


0

(I am teasing you:) You seem to be seeking a hard rule that you can apply without thinking, but there are no hard rules, certainly no One rule, and thinking is always helpful. :) It always depends, on the situation, and on what result you want. 70-90 mm is "ideal", if assuming a cropped APS sensor, and assuming a normal subject distance of at least 6 to ...


0

I will just do some math (I will avoid all the sharpness of the lens and noise things aside). 12 Mpx = 2829 x 4243 px 24 Mpx = 4000 x 6000 px If I divide 4000/2829 I get a 1.414 ratio This means If I crop a photo, taken with a 50mm lens on a 24Mpx camera to a size equivalent of a 12Mpx photo (in pixels) will look as If I had photographed that with a 70mm ...


0

More "reach" with the same lens is "achieved" with a smaller sensor (DX), which is simply a crop, but it has to be enlarged more, which is a telephoto effect ("reach"). You can easily see this in your editor, just zoom any image larger, which shows as a crop, which is enlarged more. Same visual effect as zooming with a telephoto lens (except lens zoom could ...


1

It will give you some cropping room - if you use the same lens and a couple of steps back. If you're already stood against the back wall of your studio then more pixels won't help you. 12-24Mp also isn't as big a jump as you might first think. If you're using the extra pixels as a lever to get someone to break out their wallet then you might have to try ...


0

It also depends on how much background do you want to keep. With the Pentax prime or Tamron zoom lens, you'll get a better background separation, in addition to having more backdrop behind your subject. This will arguably be nicer as the bokeh effect will be more apparent (more concentric circles, soft focus etc.). On the other hand, if you want to get ...


5

Yes, and that is the maybe the major advantage of high-resoluton sensors, for typical print sizes. You can crop the image and still get an image with reasonable detail. That said, the actual resolution of the image depends on the quality of the lens, too. Only quite high-end lenses will actually make good use of a 24MP sensor. if you look at a lens ...


0

I think that taking a head and shoulders picture with a 50mm lens means that you have to get too close for your subject's comfort and in addition risk some distortion. I've always used 90mm prime lenses with as fast an apeture as my bank balance will permit. As usual with photography, it's a trade off - it's a great lens but I have to move around a good ...


0

Although designs vary on a lens by lens basis, lenses that allow you to endlessly move the focus ring use a design that allows the focus ring to slip when the end of travel of the lens' focus element is reached. This is most often seen in lenses that use a ring type focus motor that drives the focus element using very high frequency electrical pulses rather ...


0

Well, why not just put your 70-200mm lens on and zoom until the image on your lcd is the same size as your eye view without the camera. The lens will then read what focal length your at. Or just use the view finder. Close study of actual view, LCD view and Viewfinder view will get you there but you will need a tripod and at least 10 minutes. You may find ...


0

I just did some test shots with my Canon FX50 and my Sony F3 with 55-210mm lens Here are the results - read from Bridge: Sony: F3 with 55-210mm Started at 55 mm - Bridge shows 55m - focal length in 35mm = 82mm F3 with 55-210mm full zoom at 210mm - Bridge shows 210mm - focal length in 35mm = 315mm Shows lens as 55-210mm Canon FX 50 (50 times zoom) No zoom ...


0

If travelling to a location like Mauritius is a special opportunity for you, most definitely take all three lenses! I'm pretty sure you'll be glad you did. How you'll use them depends a bit on what your goal is and what you like to shoot. If (like me) you just want to take the best pictures you can of whatever opportunities present themselves, then you're ...


0

...and if you HAVE to travel with a single lens due to packing/luggage constraints then you should definitely consider purchasing a 28-135mm, 28-200mm or 18-250mm, etc. focal length lens. As others stated the more lenses you can bring the better, depending on what types of photos you want to shoot. If you are traveling with others (children, teens, a group ...


0

In my opinion, lens changes get easier with practice, but if you really want a way around this, get/rent a second body. :) I personally keep myself from feeling stressed about lens changes by using the body cap, so I don't feel rushed to keep anything from accidentally falling into the camera body while changing lenses. Which or how many lenses you want to ...


-3

Which lens do you use the least? Take that one, and just that one. It will force you to use it, and get familiar with it. I find that as long as I have a choice of lenses, I tend to switch to the ones I'm familiar with instead of forcing myself to learn the one I'm not. Don't worry about missing shots — as null pointed out, no matter what lens you take, ...


4

The Canon 18-135mm STM lens allows for Manual override when set to AF Mode. It will not harm the lens or the camera. It is a feature that is commonly used by Videographers but also by some photographers, A common example will be at a wedding. Here you focus on the bride, you hear the beep and see the red dot. Now with the shutter half pressed, you pan over ...


5

That is intentional. As described here: This new STM lens is an inch shorter and adds a zoom lock and instant manual-focus override to the older 18-135mm EF-S IS lens, however manual focus is electronic. The focus ring isn't connected to anything, and there is a tiny time delay between when you move the ring and the lens moving. The speed at which the ...


1

I have also experienced that changing the lens is cumbersome and sometimes you tend to miss certain events while you are anxiously changing lenses That's something that you can improve by training it. A good large bag can also help, because it allows you to carry the lenses without caps1. This makes changing lenses less cumbersome: take old lens off ...


-1

Yes they are. The only real difference is the primary lens mount and the AF system.


0

"Too low" is a very subjective term, but for using the lens on both a crop camera and on a full frame camera, the lens is sharpest in the range of f/4.0 to f/8.0 or so.


1

F/1.4 vs, f/4 is three full stops. That means the f/1.4 lens allows eight times the amount of light through the lens than the f/4 lens does! This means you can shoot at lower ISO or for shorter shutter times or both. It means at the same ISO and shutter times, with the f/1.4 lens you can capture night sky objects 1/8 the brightness of what you can capture ...


4

There is a HUGE difference. The 17-40 is good for northern lights, moon-illuminated landscape and such where but it will struggle a bit with noise in other "darker" situations. The Samyang 24mm is very, very fast and quite sharp even wide open if you get a good copy...(BUT NOT VERY WIDE, which is why many night photog specialists usually also have an ...


1

You can try an adapter like this however it has an element in it so you will be at the mercy of the quality of that element. Or you could opt for one with no element like this however because of the big distance from element to sensor that nikon has you will most likely lose infinite focus (thats what the element corrects. WARNING: various makers used ...


0

the DX sensor is not the issue, I have a D3300 and I use old manual Nikon lenses all the time with no issue. There could be a few things that are the problem. First off unless you know the history of the lens (you have always owned it) it could be damaged. The elements could be miss aligned or the mechanisms are not working properly. As such the 100mm ...


0

There is a technical reason for not incorporating image stabilisation in a typical high speed Gauss type lens. Optical IS requires a moving lens component that displaces the image laterally without defocusing. This can be done in most multi-component asymmetric constructions, by moving some component controlled by a stabilising sensor. However the heavier ...


0

You might try a split-field closeup lens (filter). Though there are commercial products such as this Hoya 55 mm split-field filter or this Cokin 3-diopter filter, you could experiment with a macro lens set and an abrasive saw. A home-made split lens might not have the quality of a commercial one, but would be interesting to make. In any event, you'd have ...


3

Provided you have more than average skills with fine mechanics, it can be done. The lens focusing mechanism has a couple of guide rails, which are probably loose and must be reattached in order to have it working normally again. When the second of them came loose, focusing became hard, as the focusing rail probably would twist and not be aligned when ...


0

What you need to start is camera, lens , memory card and case. I buy from B&H, almost all body only come with SD card, extra battery and a case. The camera will come with some kind of software to at lease get you started. You need DX lens sense your camera is a crop camera. You won't find a 35mm 1.8 in DX. I would recommend the 18-55 to get you started. ...


0

I would take with me a zoom wide angle lens. The diference on size and perspective on 2 relative close objects is more noticeble than a longer focus distance. Second, I would really want the coliseum to be in the picture. A 10-24 would be awsome, but a 16-85 would give you better flexibility to take normal shoots. The zoom is not really needed for the ...


0

There are many lenses you can use for this task as long as you are diligent about the placement of people and items. You could use a good prime like a 35mm or 50mm but I would stay away from any wide angles that may cause edge distortion or make the image look like its bending. A good portrait lens will also do the job if you have the distance for the ...


1

I would say that focal length is the most important thing to look at. Somewhere around 35mm-equivalent (so, 23mm or so on APS-C). That's the field of view of most phone cameras these days — because this kind of situation is definitely one they need to cover. Similarly, kit lenses tend to be zooms covering this range, for the same basic reason (although see ...


1

The short of it is that the you will want to look for the same attributes regardless of if the lens is for indoor or outdoor use. One could argue that the following short list is of special consideration: Focal length (you may hit walls and distortion is a big concern) Weather sealing (not as important if you never go outside) Weight constraints (not as ...



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