Time to be with your loved ones

Time to be with loved ones

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1

Focal length A 50 mm focal length is considered as 'normal' for a full frame camera, i.e. with a sensor that is 24 x 36mm. With a smaller sensor the focal length for a 'normal' lens is shorter. The G15 has a 7.6 x 5.7mm sensor, so a 'normal' lens would be 11mm. The 6.1-30.5mm lens has the same field of view as a 28-140mm lens would have on a camera with a ...


4

6.1-30.5mm is the actual focal length (zoom) range for the lens, but the sensor in the camera is much smaller than that in a dSLR or film camera, so the focal lengths are also smaller. The G15 uses a 1/1.7" format sensor, so its crop factor is roughly 4.5x. The spec to look for here, if you know how focal lengths translate to field of view (FOV) on film is ...


1

If an adapter existed, on EF/EF-S, the lens would sit farther in front of the camera body than it's designed to, and this would be like using macro extension tubes: you'd lose the ability to focus to infinity with the lens, and it would only be good for photographing close subjects. Which is why such an adapter doesn't exist.


1

In the film era, the 50mm/1.8 was the kit lens, so any books/instruction from that era may emphasize its use. In the digital age with crop bodies, a 50mm lens is still relevant for a number of reasons: The Canon 50/1.8 II is super-cheap as dSLR lenses go. It makes an easier blind recommendation than a more expensive lens. If the beginner asking the ...


1

You cannot mount an EF-M Lens on a standard DSLR or at least it won't work the way you want it to. The EF-M lenses are designed to sit closer to the sensor than on a DLSR. There is no way to get the EF-M lens closer to a DSLR sensor because the mirror is in the way. You can however, put a DSLR lens on the EOS-M camera with what is essentially a spacer to ...


2

Sounds like I've had exactly the same problem as you. I suspect your lens is fixed by now but I thought I'd add a comment for your information and anyone else interested :-) We fixed my lens ourselves - nerve, concentration and patience was required! This was not a job for the faint hearted. I've just blogged our experience Fixed: error 99 with Canon EFS ...


6

In terms of which angles of view the lens(es) will allow you to select, you're correct: the combination of an 18-55 lens and a 55-200 lens will let you choose from exactly the same angles of view as a single 18-200 lens. However, I think you are missing a couple of important points, both of which are well covered in this answer: you'll get better image ...


0

Everyone needs a cheap 50mm. With f1.8 vs say your 28-300's f3.5(at it's widest aperture), you have more than a stop of light-gathering ability. 50mm gives you super powers.


2

Sure. Because you are on a Full Frame (FX) camera, it is a 'normal' lens and it will help you a lot to understand better the art of photography. See here for the details. D700 is a good camera, however its ISO performance is somewhat... um... outdated. It has let's say 'problems' in indoors and other low-light conditions. An F/1.8 is a must in such ...


0

Take it to a store and see if it works on other cameras. Then try another 28-70mm on your camera just to be sure. The lens may just need a cleaning, but it also may be related to your camera. Doing both will not isolate the issue 100%. If the lens does this on other cameras, get it serviced. If not, you may need to have the camera checked out.


1

A fisheye lens can also be used for skate videos. Watch pretty much any skate video on YouTube and they will use a fisheye lens some point in the video.


1

This malfunction can be caused by a variety of component failures, so it is impossible to know for sure without opening up the lens. You can try cleaning the electrical contacts, but it is also possible that there is an electronic or mechanical fault with an internal component. For example, there could be a problem with the circuit board. Or there could ...


3

Yes, there have been a ton of advances in image quality over the years... HOWEVER... those improvements don't only apply to lenses with a huge zoom range, but also apply to lenses with a short zoom range or no zoom at all (primes). While a modern 28-200 lens may still be better at some ranges than a cheap lens with a much shorter zoom range from 30 years ...


1

Are you looking for something like this? Basically the 300mm gets you closer to your subject. The magnification is greater than with a 200mm focal length! Hope that helps somehow!


1

As rene says, the point of one lens (for me at least) is not to shoot everything, but instead learn to see. I have been shooting 50mm lens for 3 years exclusively and now i am in my second year with 35mm. Now i can immediately see what the picture would be like without taking camera out of the bag


14

A greater zoom range means a more complex design at greatly increased cost. There are some excellent lenses make for broadcast with incredible zoom ranges, like the Fujinon 8-832mm (yes that's not a typo!), but you don't want to know the price. Designing a lens with a larger zoom range at a lower price does lead to compromises on quality. Finally lens ...


2

The idea of being able to cover all of your needs -- regardless of the lens you have on your camera or the lenses in your bag -- is a fallacy. No matter how big your kit is, you are going to come up against situations where you don't have a solution. Outside, you see that bird you want to get a photo. Maybe you've got 200mm of reach, or even 300mm or ...


0

Image quality, small size, coverage. You have to pick two out of three I'm afraid. You could get the latter two by having a single superzoom lens, the former two by taking a small number of primes (e.g. the Pentax DA Limiteds, the Olympus 12mm/45mm/75mm), or the first and last by taking a set of 17-55 and 70-200 f2.8 zooms.


1

A standard kit is what typically is sold along with a body in kit offerings. The EF 50mm 1.8 (the old one) used to be a standard kit lens too - ages ago.


2

Another alternative is to do cropping from a wide-angle lens, e.g. mounting a 28 mm lens on the Sony A7R with 36 MP means that you can get the equivalent of a 56 mm focal length at 9 MP resolution, or even "longer" if you are fine to drop further in resolution. As long as you are pairing a high-quality lens with a high-resolution sensor to adequately ...


0

Well, I'd say they are, telephoto lenses can get insanely heavy. If you want something lightweight, the EF 70-200mm f/4 L is reasonably light and gives a reasonable image quality. Costs around 700USD. If you want excellent image quality, the EF 70-200mm f/2.8 L IS II is just one of the most amazing lenses you can get (Assuming you can actually pay ~$2500 ...


7

Sounds obvious but limiting yourself to one lens is going to be limiting, Period. You can get a lens with more coverage in terms of focal-length or aperture-range but there will always be something outside of its range. Have a 28-300mm? What if want to shoot extra-wide, say 14mm? or extra long, say 400mm? Or make a very blurred background? I'm guessing you ...


3

There is a trade off between image quality and size. The smaller your sensor, the easier it is to cover a wide range of zoom distances and the lighter and smaller your lenses can be, however, they also collect less light and produce lower quality images. You have two main options for keeping things portable. You can either specialize in a particular type ...


1

To clarify, while there is a standard range of focal ranges (in between wide and telephoto) that isn't generally what the standard in standard kit lens refers to (though they are generally in the standard range. Rather, when some cameras come with multiple possible kits, the standard kit lens is the cheaper one. This is similar to how some features come ...


2

A standard kit lens is just a kit lens. However, for some models there can be different kits available. The standard kit lens will be a 18-55mm but additionally a 18-105mm kit also exists.


1

The standard kit lens is just another word for the kit lens. Certain cameras may come in a kit with a lens and sometimes there are more than one kit available with different lenses but if they are manufacturer bundles, then the lenses are known as standard kit lenses.


4

Neither. One isn't more important than the other. You get the weaknesses of both. The body is responsible for capturing the light that the lens focuses. If the lens isn't sharp enough resolution of the body doesn't matter. Similarly, if the resolution of the body is low, then sharpness of the lens doesn't matter beyond a certain point. Lens speed ...


3

In the same conditions, if you don't need any specific feature of the high end body, a cheap body with a good lens will produce better pictures than an high-end body with a cheap lens. But: If you have a challenging subject like sports or birds-in-flight you need the better auto focus and higher burst rate of high-end bodies - the best lens in the world ...


0

Another very plausible reason for the exposure change is if your using the 28mm 1.8 at f1.8 and you change to the 100mm 2.8. their is no larger aperture than f2.8 so exposure must be compensated.


16

There are two basic possibilities. First, and probably the biggest: the metering takes into account more of the scene with the wider angle, and the scene is different enough that the exposure choice is correspondingly different. This is particularly likely to be the case if there are actual light sources or shadow areas in the scene. You don't mention what ...


1

The meter will adjust to the scene depending on what meter mode you have selected. Depending on your camera you can have it meter as much as the whole frame, as tiny as a spot under the AF point, or somewhere in between. Let's say you have your 28mm on and taking a picture of something on your coffee table and the wide field of view gets the TV (which is ...


0

I will add my 5 cents worth (can't do 2 anymore, we discontinued the penny in Canada). First, I will add that I have only shot in the studio about a half dozen times in meetups with other photographers. I have almost exclusively used my 28-135mm for all of these shoots. It isn't a great lens, but in a studio with GOOD lighting conditions (i.e. studio ...


1

Under what circumstances? I used to carry a camera all the time (back in my 400D days) but eventually got fed up with the weight, then again, I'm a hobbyist only anyway. (I.e. I make no money from my photos.) In contrast, if you were a professional, you'd carry your camera with you more regularly. (Plus there is the question of mode of transportation - ...


0

There's a focus limiting switch - so that when you're doing macro work, it won't hunt through the whole range. Look over the lens and find the switch and turn it off.


0

I would very much like to do so, but unfortunately it has a drawback. If you carry around expensive camera equipment you can become a target for thieves. I suppose that a mirrorless camera like the Nikon 1 you can help with this concern as you get the ability to use interchangable lenses with a camera body that is light, easily concealed and less ...


0

You compare them the same way you compare any other two lenses. There is no reason for them to be inherently better or worse. The bigger difference is sensor size. Smaller sensor size means smaller lenses, but also less bokeh and lesser low light performance. There is no reason that the image quality (sharpness, aberrations, etc) should suffer though and ...


3

It sounds like you need to do wet cleaning. Use some lens cleaner fluid and lens tissue to clean the surface of the lens' front element. Wet cleaning will remove the deposits of dust that were present and were more or less glued to the surface of the lens by the moisture from the frost. Trying to remove such dried on deposits using dry cleaning methods such ...


0

Sounds like this are leftovers from water condensation. Try a few rounds of breathe-and-wipe cleaning with reasonably firm pressure and the stains should go away. Lens coatings these days are pretty durable and I don't think that they are destroyed by 18F temperature.


1

No expert at all here, but it sounds as if the coating of the lens was damaged by the removing of the frost.


4

Mirrorless cameras come in smaller bodies and can come with smaller sensors as well. Sony has a full frame mirrorless. Fuji has some APS-C size sensors, and then there is an array of micro-four thirds cameras, such as Olympus OMD line. Everything is a tradeoff, but the smaller sensors let you use smaller lenses. Some of those lenses are incredibly good. ...


1

A number of reasons: The much higher speeds of focal plane shutters is more versatile than the higher flash sync of leaf shutters, which usually maxed out at 1/500 sec. Medium format focal plane shutters are more vibration-prone than smaller format shutters making a leaf shutter more desirable on larger formats. Those medium format systems with leaf ...


2

The SLR Magic Hyper Prime is lower than that at f/0.95, and Leica's Noctilux also offers f/0.95. And then there's the brand new IBELUX 40mm f/0.85. And if rental counts, you can rent the Zeiss f/0.7 lens made for NASA and famously used by Stanley Kubrick - but only attached to a specific camera. That's often claimed to be the largest practically usable ...


0

The T70 uses the older FD mount, and unless the lenses are very nice, it's generally not worth trying to adapt FD lenses for the newer EF mount. As for the Paragon lens, you'd need to know more about exactly which mount it uses. Hopefully someone can provide that information from your pictures.


2

Short: Do not do that! More in detail: FD requires an adapter. If this adapter has no additional optics then you will not be able to focus on infinity and not from a certain distance. You can use the lens in macro areas though. Adapters with a lens overcome this shortage for the price of a significant loss in optical quality. Better go for M42 lenses ...


0

Better focus your investment on lenses, not bodies, when you go for (home-) studio photography. I'd recommend an EF 50mm 1.4. Alternatively an EF 85mm 1.8 accompanied by a 50mm 1.8. Well, on the other hand, when you want to get real closeups too, and considering that your body is a crop size one, then an EF-S 60mm Macro could be the lens of choice. It ...


0

I might also pitch the Rokinon 24mm f/1.4 lens. Due to its aperture it will not give you as much coverage of the night sky as the 14mm, but it is still a very wide angle lens and with a focal ratio of 1.4 it lets in slightly more than one stop more light than the 14mm which is a big help on a crop frame sensor as well as your full frame sensor. Crop frame ...


1

For sports photography, you need to be able to use a fast shutter speed as you'll always want to use 1/500s or faster exposures in order to avoid motion blur (rule of thumb, 1/250s or faster for posed photos, 1/500s or faster for people moving). A wider aperture would therefore be recommended. I wouldn't say that a f/5.6 would be enough, except in bright ...


0

The 50mm/1.8 lens is a very sharp prime lens and one of the best lenses I have for D5100. I just love it and use it very often. You have lots of room for cropping your images due to its sharpness. For example, if you cut off 1/2 of the image, you'd have the 100mm equivalent and still 8 megapixels of resolution. Also, this lens works very good for portraits ...



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