Sunset in Kruger

by MrFrench

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0

There are 14 points to the star. This points to one specific option of doing it in camera. The lens has 7 blades. The diffraction spikes formed by the lens form at two spots for each blade, one major one and one minor one 180 degrees from the major one. You will notice that every other star point is shorter than its neighbors. As I said, this points to ...


1

You could, in a REALLY amateur method pick up a black paperboard and precisely cut out a circle in the center to obtain a closer-like aperture, but of course this is a really rough way and no high quality at all can be demanded. The cutted paperpoard if it is thin enough and the outer circle is cutted precisely it can be placed inside the bottom of the lens ...


0

What lens you chose really depends on two things; what composition you desire and the space you have to shoot in. I can't tell you the answer to either. Since you have a bit of time to adjust your shot before the guests arrive I think that the best answer is to simply take advantage of that. Bring a friend along who can stand in position and try out your ...


0

In general, fixed focal length lenses are critical, if you are unsure about the distance to the subject you want to capture. So if you cannot choose the distance arbitrarily or if the subject is moving fast towards the camera, you are likely to have trouble using your 90mm F2.8 though it is the best lens for bad light conditions. If you want to shoot ...


0

You should buy another camera only if the limitations of your present camera are holding you back. Are they? You mentioned in your question that you see the limits of your present camera. What exactly are they? As it stands, your question is vague. Don't buy an SLR because you think it will last. As long as your present camera meets your needs, it lasts ...


0

I would like a nice camera that will last! Just because you pay more for a dSLR than a bridge camera doesn't necessarily mean it's going to last you any longer. Mostly, a more expensive camera simply means more features to play with while you have it. Unlike film SLRs, these devices are no longer mainly mechanical. These are digital electronics. ...


0

An SLR is an investment and a kit. You will replace the body as time goes on, but you want to buy good lenses so those won't have to replace those (especially considering their price). There is also a large image quality difference between your PowerShot and the 100D. The 100D can shoot in raw (think "digital negative") and can allow you to upgrade ...


0

I finally managed to an article related to my questions. Apparently what was improved in the newer version was: Zoom lock button SIC – Super Integrated Coating. Source


0

I recently picked up an SLR Zoom with the ball head to use with my Canon T5i for taking macro photos outside. It's not perfect, and it can get pretty finicky for stability if you have the camera too much off level. It's good in a pinch (and infinitely better than hand-holding for macro work), but using either a long timer or a remote becomes critical, and ...


1

If you look towards the front element it will say STM:


4

Comparing super zoom lenses is really not very much different then comparing any other lens. For super zoom lenses you need to understand that in general they are all based on compromises. The big three that you will have to choose between are optical quality, size, and price. Typically you get to choose either 1 or 2 of the 3, but not all three. Size, ...


0

Generally, if you want the best image quality, prepare to spend on the top of the line f/2.8 zoom lenses. However, its illogical to suggest them without knowing the purpose of your photographs and the budget of the purchase.


1

The STM version is better because it has faster, smoother AF, and the front element does not rotate. The optics are also improved which gives you better image quality. The STM focus ring is active during Auto Focus and you can small manual adjustments to focus. This is called Full Time Manual Focus. The STM version also has a much nicer EW-63C lens hood. ...


0

No it isn't I returned one I'd ordered to use with a Canon EOS 40D. It couldn't support this even with the fairly lightweight 50mm f1.8 lens. It would be worth investigating the Gorillapod Focus, which is designed for heavier cameras. I'm going to get one to try it out, but haven't got round to it yet


0

When you say it looks like there is no lens attached, the only thing that comes to mind is the battery being flat. Given it's a new camera, try charging up the battery. With a dead battery you see almost nothing through the viewfinder. Very dark and very blurry (not just out of focus). With the battery charged it might look blurry if the lens wasn't ...


4

Unfortunately, no. While a Gorillapod is highly practical, and I have the SLR-Zoom too, it is weakest for long lenses because it is very sensitive to an off-center center-of-gravity. When a lens extends out much from the camera body, Gorillapod becomes unstable.


2

It is very likely that the camera has suffered internal damage which, unless you have some quite specialist tools to hand, you won't be able to fix yourself. It is more likely to be mechanical damage than dirt or electronic failure, so the lens is unable to lock in place or there is something else out of place. The problem is if you strip it down yourself ...


-3

Please ignore comments which suggest the Sigma 18-300 is not up to the job. I have a Nikon D3200 and bought this lens because I was very unhappy with the Nikon 18-105 vr. The Sigma is superb. Sharpness, contrast, pop, fantastic range. I am finally getting results I had always expected from 24 million pixels. This lens gets 5 stars from me. I cannot find a ...


4

The focal length of a modern zoom lens isn't something that is nice and easy to work with a lens equation to get the answer. From hyperphysics on the true zoom telephoto lens, the lens can be thought of as a few different elements: The problem is, these elements keep moving around: which makes the entire system a bit more complex to calculate for. ...


2

What you're experiencing is called spherochromatism. As described in this LensRentals blog post, spherochromatism is basically spherical aberration that varies with the light wavelength. This results in chromatic aberration that gets worse the farther away you get from the plane of focus. I wouldn't worry about it. This is normal for an inexpensive fast ...


0

You may find that some lenses (both DSLR or SLR ones) rotate their front element when focusing. If your DSLR does and your SLR doesn't, it may be a pain to use graduated or polarising filters. More info: http://www.ephotozine.com/forums/topic/filters-and-lenses-that-rotate-the-front-element-27373 Also DSLRs don't need UV filters (maybe except to protect ...


1

M42 mount lenses (manual screw mount) can be used on almost any known brand as there are a wide variety of adapters available. This applies to any full frame and any DSLR / System camera that's not a 4/3. Sony can use the "newer" Minolta AF lenses, these were also quite common back in the day. Of course, some older lenses do not have AF and the use of ...


4

They are referring to the amount of clearance between the lens rear element and the sensor. The C mount flange focal distance is 17.52mm so both of these lenses have rear elements that stick into the camera body. This fact is most relevant to SLR cameras that have a mirror which moves out of the way when a photo is taken, a lens that sticks into the camera ...


1

YES!!! Definitely! some (polarisers) will work differently but that's just part of the fun. I use red, yellow, orange and blue filters for BW and they work perfectly. Some may argue that this is not necessary as you can filter on colours in post-processing, but postprocessing will definitely diminish the amount of information (bits!) of the image while ...


1

From what I know back focal length depend of the optical construction of the lens. And it is important for mirror cameras. For example you can't mount EF-S lens on fullframe camera because last element will interfere with the mirror (which is bigger than APC cameras). P.S. Above abbreviations and explanation are related to Canon cameras and lens, but IMHO ...


0

Besides polarization, color filters are the main compatibility problem you are likely to run into between film and digital cameras. While you may not have any color filters for your lenses, watch out for color flash filters. For example, there are some common green gels to match your flash color to fluorescent lights, and orange gels to match incandescent. ...


3

Yes. The only thing you want to look out for is "linear" polarizing filters, which interfere with TTL metering and autofocus. If your old gear doesn't have those features, your polarizing filters might be of the linear type. Newer polarizing filters are of the "circular" type, which doesn't cause problems with modern systems. (Despite the name, "circular ...


0

Current autofocusing lens mounts Each SLR brand has actually had multiple mounts over time, but the current dSLR mounts, except for four-thirds cameras, all have backwards compatibility with the current autofocusing mounts: Pentax K, Nikon F, Canon EOS, and Minolta AF (Sony Alpha). 3rd party lenses may not autofocus correctly and can require rechipping due ...


2

as a committed Pentax user who has had many a good shooting session with M42 screw lenses on Pentax DSLRs, I can't believe I'm about to say this but: While other posters are completely correct that Pentax is awesome for compatibility with old lenses, and the in body image stabilisation is a particular high point, no one has mentioned Canon and that's ...


8

As Matt noted, there's no general reason that you can't use them if the diameters match up with your lens elements. The only thing I would note in addition to that is that you may run into linear polarizers which may not work correctly with your camera's metering and autofocus systems. That's not really an issue for focussing if you manually focus. For ...


8

Yes, there is no reason that these would not work, assuming that their filter diameter matches your lenses, of course. As with lenses in general, there have been improvements in design and manufacturing which may make newer filters nicer. For example better coatings are available, and older filters are less likely to be multi-coated. You may also find newer ...


0

My lens has the same issue, when i opened it i found that 2 of the ribbon cables were broken... they extend and contract as the internals of the lens moves. I ordered replacements on ebay cheap, and set to change them, this proves very very difficult, as you must get the very center of the lens and there are about a billion tiny screws, and re-assembly ...


4

The other answers are correct: for this lens, the hood attaches to a bayonet on the outside of the lens, and the filter threads are still clear so that screw-in filters can still be added. It should be noted, however that this isn't universally true: screw-in hoods are available, and for some lenses this is/was the OEM solution. Also, some filter options -- ...


0

Yes. The hood dosen't atach to the filter mount. It ataches to an exterior ring. You could atach a pile of 20 filters one on the top of another and the hood will do fine. (of course you shouldn't 20 filters at once)


1

Yes, the filter has the same diameter as the lens so it won't prevent you from mounting the lens hood.


0

In my case, yes. Very typical. My EF 24-105 f/4L IS USM developed zoom creep after about four or five years. It's probably one of my most-used lenses. I did attempt peeling back the rubber on the zoom ring and using the screws to adjust the tension, but the creep returned pretty quickly. While a big flat rubber band, like the lensband, can be used to add ...



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