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by clabacchio

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1

The problem is that with a reverse macro adapter, the lens loses all electrical connection with the camera and thus its aperture will stay in the default setting, which is usually the smallest possible aperture that gives you very little light. If the lens does not have manual aperture control, I heard that you can get an "aperture control attachment", not ...


1

I have two old lenses that I knocked down causing dented filter ring. Both were attached to camera body. One was a 2ft drop onto a soft flooring, one was a 1/2 ft knock to a basin, when I was hanging the camera on my shoulder. Both lenses are still functionally intact.


2

If your goal is to minimize star trails then the wider aperture is always preferred. The wider angle lens will allow you to get more of the milky way in a single shot, but if you are comfortable and willing to stitch multiple images together then it doesn't matter much. See: How do I capture the milky way?


1

If you have the lens, make test pictures on a normal day of a very far (almost at infinity) point-like object, like an antenna. Use a tripod, use fast shutter, low ISO, compare the images. You cannot get better comparison than actually doing it yourself! :-)


0

I bought a 24-70mm f4 because I do macro shots (I'm a dentist). In addition to other information already mentioned, the 24-70 f/4 has a wider aperture, which means that it makes better pictures in environments with little light. And according to the tests, it has a better result in your entire field of zoom. In short: 24-105 is good for travels and ...


0

This really comes down to a personal choice: whether you prefer the constant aperture and slightly better center of frame sharpness of the 17-50 or the extra reach and better sharpness on the edges and in the corners of the 17-70. For the outdoor stuff the reach of the 17-70 is probably a little better, but for the family photos (especially indoors) the ...


3

You're not seeing ordinary lateral chromatic aberration, but longitudinal chromatic aberration, which occurs in front or behind the plane of focus with fast lenses. Both types of chromatic aberration will be zero in the centre of the image at the plane of focus. In this case the image is slightly misfocused, which is common with phase detect autofocus and ...


1

As a rule, 50/1.8s (or pretty much any 50, for that matter) are very good lenses. Price isn't too good an indicator of quality for 50s- a company's f/1.8 design can be optically better than its f/1.4. Your 50mm is almost certainly better than your zoom lenses. Testing a lens wide open and at a close distance is going to show it at its worst.Have you tested ...


6

I think what we see here is not the traditional lateral chromatic aberration. This is appearing in the center of the image, in more or less blurred area, the color is blue and purple and is dependent on an f-stop. I think it is a combination of axial chromatic aberration and spherical aberration. Some thoughts: This is probably shot at very short ...


0

I agree with @ElendilTheTall, what you are seeing is not at all uncommon in this price bracket. Just to extend on what has been said - with regards to the PhotoReview test you mentioned: if I read the EXIF data included with the tests these were measured at f/5.0. In which case I would say they agree with your images. I don't think the lens is faulty.


1

Chromatic aberration of this kind is not uncommon in consumer lenses when shooting wide open, and it appears this lens is no exception. You will need to be looking at paying at least five times as much for a lens that doesn't exhibit it to the same degree. No wide aperture lens is at its best wide open in any case. Fortunately, chromatic aberration is very ...


3

Actually instead of holding the apeture lever or using an aftermarket adapter you can use your DOF preview button or live view when the lens is connected properly. Then without shutting the camera off, pop the lens off and your apeture should stay where you had it set while it was connected properly. Much easier and I have used this trick with a d3100, ...


0

Okay, I'm pretty sure this checks out, but haven't yet sanity-checked it with any physical lenses. Let's say 0 and 1 represent the distance scale / focus ring position at the MFD mark and infinity, respectively. Then 0.5, for instance, would mean turning the ring halfway between the extremities. Then, we have a hyperbolic curve like this: a = 1 - dmfd ...


0

Ken Rockwell talks a bit about your threading issue here. He seems to think this is the standard 52mm thread, which Canon/Nikon fans would be familiar with, but Leica fans would think was quite unique. Ken is usually right about these things.


0

Note: This answer assumes the question refers to the first edition of the Canon 24-70 f2.8, not to the "II" that also exists. The Canon has less distortion and autofocus will be faster. Technical comparisons can be found here for example: Tamron - Canon The Canon one also has an (for lack of better term) inverted zoom, meaning that the lens will get ...


0

The Kenko Pro 300 1.4x TC says it will not work with an EF-S lens like the 55-250. Everything I've read says the 2x is the same. So, regardless of AF issues, I'd say this is a no go.


2

The main area in which lenses have improved significantly in the time since you purchased your current kit are two fold: Fast zoom lenses The use of computer modeling in the development of new lenses has allowed the current crop of very fast, very expensive zoom lenses to approach and sometimes equal the performance of much more modestly prices prime ...


3

The issues reported of AF detection causing 'hunting' and card issues do not appear to be lens related. The 'kit' lenses for the D3300/5300 listed aren't likely to be a vast improvement over the ones you have already (if indeed they're not kit lenses themselves for some models). That means to get any worthwhile improvement you'd need to head up the lens ...


1

No: I love my NEX 5T. The kit lens, and the additional 16mm f/2.8 I purchased, are both unremarkable, (I really mean, they are terrible,) but I have a lot of fun, and have had some success, using an old Canon 50mm f/1.8 and and old Sigma 28mm f/2.8 with an adapter. The beauty of the NEX is that with a little practice you can get good results with manual ...


0

You might check B&H or Adorama for a new or used 55mm Micro Nikkor. They're usually available for less than $400 new or under $200 used. It's a manual focus lens, which should work fine for your use, and is tack sharp. Here's some good info: http://www.kenrockwell.com/nikon/55f28ais.htm


3

There are various general considerations when buying a macro lens. What is compatible with my camera? Nikon's macro lenses include the word Micro in their name and their current line up can be found here. From those you would need an AF-S lens or you will not be able to use autofocus. What level of magnification are you looking achieve? The smaller the ...


0

How much time has passed since you bought the lens? How do you know it was damaged through shake? Is it noticeable externally? If it looks damaged on the outside you may forget your warranty. If not, activate the warranty and wait for a free repair. I guess it's always repairable, since they can fully replace the lens' motor. It only depends how much you ...


2

There is a SAL1855 service manual here Actual link is via "Get Manual" at lower left of page - appears authentic. 40 pages in English and 78 total. Attempting to just copy download address directly failed - they control free downloads to 2 per day and that is probably part of their mechanism for doing so. It would be interesting to see what else they have. ...


1

I have the Nikon 28 PC AIS. You can often find it used at a good price, mine was $100. The lens is a little soft at the corners and chromatic abberation increases the more you shift (easily fixed in post). However, it's not a bad lens at all and if you're primarily worried about converging verticals then it may be all you need. I strongly prefer shifting ...


0

It really all depends on where you are. I would avoid using a camera retailer, because they usually send the gear to the manufacturer. If you're anywhere near Michigan, I'd recommend either Oakland Photographic Repair or Midwest Camera Repair. Midwest RARELY ships gear to other facilities, and they do repairs in a timely manner. Oakland Photographic Repair ...


0

By a process of elimination if the lenses still work on other bodies, they are OK. Since no lenses now work on the D70 and they all did previously then that has probably failed. Since you've cleaned the contacts the only thing is that the mechanical aperture control may be stuck and failing that it would need specialist attention and would probably be ...


2

This is a variation of the question, "Should I capture the final image in-camera or create the image in Post Processing?". The answer depends on your goals for the image. I use both approaches. I like the photographic challenges of capturing everything in camera. So, sometimes my set up looks like a Rube Goldberg contraption. On the other hand, in ...


2

This may help. It's not exactly what you wanted to hear but it's probably better than what the camera shop has advised. How to remove a stuck Canon 50mm 1.8 lens from your camera Note that this may not be what has happened in your case, but it sounds very similar. He says - What happens is that there is a snap on plastic dust cover on the mount end of ...


1

Quality and Clarity are, unfortunately, subjective. Why two different cameras of the same megapixel value would have different output could be up to any of the following: * Sensor manufacturer * Software handling of the image * Lens * f-stop, shutter speed or ISO selected by the software. And if you are talking about cameras with interchangeable lenses, ...


4

Short(er) non-techy answer, to follow up the other two excellent (but long) replies. Your camera is as good as the weakest component. Lets start with a $50,000 Hasselblad H5D-60 as an example. 50Mp sensor, the lens costs more than my motorbike. You won't get better quality outside a research lab. take off the lens and replace it with a plastic one from a ...


-1

You must consider the ISO you are using to take pictures. higher iso reduce definition lower iso improves definition higher iso needs less time of exposure lower iso needs more time of exposure


23

You're right. Picture quality is as complex as, say, how well a food item tastes. Megapixels only tell you the number of pixels the picture is made up of, and more is certainly not always better. More pixels on a small sensor means more noise. Megapixels are often used by marketing just because people want simple truths, like 18 MP must be better than 10. ...


14

GEEKY ANSWER - you have been warned. There's much more to the image quality than just lens and megapixels. The most important factor in any photograph is: Light You can have the best camera and lens in the universe - and that will still be meaningless if you have no light, or very badly lit subject. After that comes... lens. Lens is what bends the ...


1

That's a pretty common issue with some waterproof cameras. To eliminate the internal humidity you can try storing it (with the battery and card slots open) with silica gel packs, or using a hair dryer on it (also with the battery and card slots open) for a while just before use.


1

I've never heard of the system that was described in the question but I can understand how it works. I can see no reason that it wouldn't work for fixed image photography as it would for cinematography. What concerns me is the quality. The large lens, ground glass (possibly milk glass), and the attachment to the camera lens would all have to be light tight. ...


1

Are there any problems with attaching non-MFT lenses? No, though you will not have access to any electronic/auto features of the lens such as AF, stabilization etc, you'll have to do everything manually. You need to take into account the crop factor, lenses for smaller systems like 8mm, CCTV etc may vignette or produce a circular image with black borders ...


16

It's a Iscorama anamorphic adapter from a projector attached to what is probably a 50mm or 85mm prime lens via a clamp (the bit with the two screws coming out). The adapter compresses the frame in the horizontal direction by a factor of 2 to get a widescreen image into a standard super 35mm frame. Anamorphics are commonly used for cinematography but rarely ...


0

The best thing to do is to return the camera, as this kind of camera is not supposed to accumulate condensation inside. Another option is to keep the camera near to an incandescent light ( electric bulb) to let water evaporate.


3

A good web store like B&H has a list that seems to satisfy that criteria. http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/buy/Lens-Adapters/ci/3420/N/4077634486 There you can use filters like Brand (manufacturer) Camera fitting side (male side of adapter, camera mount) Lens fitting side (female, lens mount)


2

The Canon 50/1.8 II is a pricing anomaly. A better comparison might be the EF 45/2.8 STM pancake lens ($200), and the Olympus 17mm f/2.8 pancake lens ($250). And if you really think about it, a normal fast lens on Canon APS-C would be a 35/2, which, if you get the non-IS version is about $550, new. The EF 35/1.4L is about $1500. And the Panasonic Leica ...


0

I know that toothpaste (not tooth gels) are used on goggles to keep them from fogging. I have been using the same with an underwater camera that fogs and so far it has done pretty good.


9

Camera and lens designs are full of compromises and certain decisions have knock on effect throughout the system. Olympus decided on a particularly thick filter stack when specifying the micro four thirds system. This and the short backfocus distance of a mirrorless lens mount necessitate a telecentric or near telecentric lens design where rays exit the ...


15

The basic answer is that Canon's 50mm f/1.8 is an exception even within Canon's lineup. It's an old, simple design with nothing fancy, and made to be mass-produced cheaply. Compare the Canon 85mm f/1.8, at AU$360. Basically, almost no lenses are as cheap as the one you're using as your reference point, so your perception is skewed. The Olympus lenses aren't ...


1

Part of the reason is probably that Canon and m4/3 have different flange focal distances, which has a big effect on what focal lengths can be done with simple and cheap lens designs. For the flange focal distances found in typical SLR systems, 50mm is a sweet spot in that regard. For the much shorter distance of the m4/3 system, this is not the case.


4

I guess you are confused with term "faster lens". It basically a high quality glass with very small f number say f/1.2. The use of this kinda aperture is in low light conditions. When you can bring down the f number to gather more light, it helps you choose a faster shutter speed, you can pick a shutter speed you camera is designed for in your case no matter ...


1

Three years is not old for a lens. Is it possible that it was very cold and accumulated humidity from a warmer environment when you were using it? In that case, just let it rest to get the same temperature, and the humidity will disappear.


6

I'm not sure what you are hoping for. The shutter is not in the lens, but rather in the camera. A lens can't increase the maximum shutter speed of the camera itself unless it had it's own independent shutter. I'm not aware of any such lenses. Speed Boosting adapters are not used to increase the maximum shutter speed of the camera, but rather to focus ...


1

check out the tokina 11 - 16mm 2.8f http://www.tokinalens.com/tokina/products/atxpro/atx116prodxii/


6

The "telecompressor" you mentioned is a focal reducer, a device that concentrates the image in order to project it onto a smaller sensor. This approach reduces the backfocus distance (the distance from the back of the lens to the sensor). So it only works on mirrorless cameras using lenses designed for DSLRs (which have sufficient backfocus distance to make ...



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