Lunch atop a (Springfield) skyscraper

Lunch atop a (Springfield) skyscraper
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0

why a lens's aperture only shuts to its specified stop when the shutter release is pressed, instead of staying static at that stop constantly That's because a closed aperture would reduce the amount of light coming to your eye. The viewfinder would be dim. Try the preview button on a lens with a wide open aperture like f1.4 and an aperture setting of ...


3

Why is the Depth of Field Preview button necessary? With the lens wide open, as it normally is before you take the shot, you can't tell how much depth of field you'll get in the photograph. When you press the button, the lens is stopped down to the selected aperture letting you see the shot as it will be recorded, depth of field and all. For both ...


0

That lens is available from Sigma with a Sony mount, so there's no need for an adapter if you haven't yet bought the lens -- just buy the Sony version. If you already have the lens for some other mount, see Can I use lens brand X on interchangeable lens camera brand Y? for information about which mounts can be adapted to which others and what drawbacks ...


6

In lighting terms, a gel is a piece of thin, transparent, plasticky material in the color of your choosing. Rosco and LEE are perhaps the best known gel manufacturers, at least in the US. Gels come in large sheets that you cut down to fit your application. One 20"x24" sheet of a given color will probably last a lifetime if you're only using it in your gel ...


4

A gel filter cut to a circle slightly larger than 39mm in diameter is what the holder is designed to hold. There should be a flap that opens up and lets you insert the filter material. You then close the flap back over the filter material to hold it in place.


1

It could damage the new camera, but if everything is dry it's quite unlikely. But if you're risk-averse don't try it. If there are or were any signs of salt water having got inside the optics it will be ruined optically anyway, so there's no point testing. Unless the lens is worth quite a bit it might be worth the test, but not if the camera is expensive. ...


5

This reply to @Caleb's comment kept growing and growing into an off-topic answer. Maybe you still find it useful. After mounting the zoom ring gear, I'll attach a pinion gear to the stepper motor shaft to control the motion of the zoom ring. A linear zoom throw allows for smooth, consistent zooming that doesn't draw attention to itself. ...


0

My understanding of a "normal" lens as a casual student dipping in and out of books and online courses is that 50mm lenses (as found on 35mm film cameras) replicates the same focused field of view as the human eye. Which also just happens to be approximately 50°. Though it is true that we see a much wider angle than that in our peripheral vision, how much of ...


3

Switch the camera to using a single auto-focus spot in the middle of the frame. Most high end cameras have this capability. I don't know if your Sony camera can do that or how it will show you the spot if it does, but look around the owners manual. On my Nikon, the autofocus spots are shown as small red rectangles in the viewfinder. You point the spot at ...


2

Bird photography is the kind of situation where you have to select one of the auto-focus point (usually the center one). With such setting, you have a better control where the focus is done (as the camera will not switch between the focus-points). Furthermore you do not really care if the subject is right in the center of the image as, most of the time, you ...


0

See this thread at dpreview.com. Several people have posted there that they have the same problem with the J1 using the 10-30mm. Nikon issued a service advisory to correct/repair a design flaw with that lens.


1

My guess, without more info is that you have accidently changed your camera's mode to 'manual'. Press the 'Menu' button, then click 'Exposue Mode' using the control dial. Next choose 'P' for program mode and press the Menu button. The camera should now take pics normally. As an aside, the 10-30 lens has free update available to correct a focus problem if you ...


4

The thin lens equation is 1/f = 1/do + 1/di, where f = focal length di = image distance = distance from lens to sensor do = object distance = distance from lens to subject. The focal length of a lens is defined by the thin lens equation, and it can be interpreted as a measure of the inverse strength of the lens. If you make a lens's optical surfaces more ...


1

The specific answer to the core of your Title Question, "the term for the distance", is: Infinity. Infinity is the (imagined) subject distance in front of the optical center of the lens that corresponds to an in-focus image on the sensor when it is spaced behind the lens at the nominal focal length. The engraved "focal length" which appears somewhere on ...


10

Focal length is the distance between the lens and the sensor when the subject is in focus, not the distance to the subject. The term for the distance to the subject in focus is the focus distance. The zone which is in focus either side (front and back) of the subject is the depth of field. This varies with the aperture - depth of field increases as the ...


4

If I've got a decent Box and have the means to protect the camera underwater, the lenses aren't IN the box how are they protected? Underwater housings completely contain both the body and the lens. It looks like the Nauticam setup has various lens housings that mate with the body housing, and you'll certainly need both parts.


0

What do the various lines mean? What are the axes? The source we all quote on how to read an MTF chart is Michael Reichmann's article at Luminous Landscape. Most of the following information is cribbed from that article. However, keep in mind that these particular conventions only apply to Canon MTF charts. Other lens makers may have different ways to ...


0

I had the same question a while back and the advice I was given was to use the kit lens at aprox 35 and at aprox 50 for what I would normally photograph, and then analyze the pictures afterwards and decide which look I preferred. One thing of note, is that its not just focal length that is different, but also background compression. In otherwords, the 50mm ...


0

These two lense are mostly equivalent in a lot of things--build quality, price range, focus motor features, image quality, age of design... So the one big difference between them is 35mm vs. 50mm. 50mm is special in one way. The magnification of the lens most closely matches that of the human eye and there's little distortion. In other words, if you ...


0

My preference in this case would be the 50 mm lens, because my interest is in landscape photography. While the 35 mm lens would give you a better field of view, it's better to use a 50 mm lens and then get to the desired field of view by compiling a panorama, as that yields a higher resolution image. Even if the resolution of the picture taken by a 35 mm ...


0

I have both lenses. Both are awesome lenses. For 35mm you will get some more wider that's all the difference.


12

Disclaimer: I am not a Canon shooter, nor have I owned Canon gear before. This appears to be a 300mm ƒ/2.8L USM (non IS) lens, produced from 1987 to 1999. The best collection of images, review, and information about this particular Canon lens I could find is: 300mm ƒ/2.8L at kenrockwell.com. Searching for this threw me off, because if you go to the Lens ...


4

As to why Japan was/is so successful a lens-making nation, the summary in this excellent thesis answers your question pretty well: http://www.academia.edu/891283/Rivalry_and_Cooperation_How_the_Japanese_Photography_Industry_Went_Global Edit: in a nutshell, the thesis linked here identifies that Japan benefitted from considerable market protection put in ...


1

And to add "close East" remark. Soviet Union also make a lot of cameras and lens. Cameras Source 1 (in Russian) Cameras Source 2 (in Russian) Cameras Source 3 (in Russian) Lens Source 1 Lens Source 2 P.S. There is a lot of information in Russian language about old (and new) cameras and lenses, manufactured in ex Soviet Union and I just do not have ...


6

Japan was not the only country making cameras and lenses in the 1970's and 1980's but they had a huge market share. (they still do) Before World War II most good cameras were made in Germany. Japanese companies started making copies of German cameras in the late 1930's and by the time the war ended, these Japanese cameras were very good quality. In the ...


2

The Canon CL 8-120mm f/1.4-2.1 lens was designed to be used with the Canon EX1/EX2 Hi8 Video Camera with a VL mount. Canon also had a EOS to VL mount adapter so EF lenses could be used on these cameras. I would expect the pin arrangement should be the same as for an EF lens. The bad news is that the sensor size for the Canon EX1 was 1/2" which is ...


1

As indicated above, it is what you want the lens for that will be the deciding factor. I would also emphasize using the kit lens at 35mm and 50mm to see what you will like best. Tape the lens so it won't zoom when being used after setting the focus. However I have the 50mm f/1.8 lens for portraits, and am not happy with it. It works just fine, but I should ...


2

There's a quite good article here about the human vision system in comparison with photographic ones. The human vision system is not complete considering only a lens and a retina. Your vision is highly interpreted by your brain, and for this reason you can't make direct comparisons. From long experience the focal length generally used to produce a field ...


0

Light from a distant subject enters the lens as bundles of parallel rays of light. We can mount devices that intercept and thus modify the image formatting rays before they enter the camera lens. These devices are called supplementary lens systems. As an example, an ordinary wide-angle front door peephole lens array can be mounted before the camera, and this ...


2

Can I clamp these iPhone lenses onto these M12 lenses? Will they work? They'll probably work to some degree. I've taken pictures with an iPhone by holding the lens up near the viewfinder of a DSLR, the objective of a microscope, and the eyepiece of a telescope. All worked better than I'd hoped, but it's more like using sunglasses in front of a digital ...


1

Despite a whole lot of bitching and whining and fighting between Canon and Nikon fanboys, they tend to stay pretty close together in lens performance. If Canon releases a new version of their 70-200 which is much improved, you can be sure Nikon will move quickly to catch up. They're very competitive. If you're a general purpose shooter, you're really not ...


1

You've already gotten good answers on minor variation between lenses of the same stated focal length due to rounding and distortion, which answers the broader issue, but specifically as to "some are labeled as wide angle and some art not" the answer is "no, there are not major differences, this is simply about marketing choices."


10

A certain focal-length given a fixed sensor-size is expected to show the same field of view. That is, on the same camera, two lenses of the same focal-length will give the same field-of-view. There are two catches however: Focal-lengths are often rounded to conventional numbers. For example, a 35mm lens may be in fact a 34mm or 36mm, or even fractional. ...


2

The camera lens projects an image of the outside world onto the surface of film or digital image sensor. Focal length is a measure taken when the lens is imaging a far distant subject like a star; this is a distance we call infinity (as far as the eye can see symbol∞. This measure is from a point called the rear nodal to the image plane (focal plane). The ...


0

I experienced the same problem with my 18-270 lens at the low end of the zoom and with a polarising filter. I tried it with and without hood and changing the aperture and shutter speed. What I found was that vignetting occurs whether the hood is there or not, but occurs at the 18mm zoom with the higher shutter speed. With a lower shutter speed or higher ...


5

If two lenses have exactly the same focal length and exactly the same amount of distortion, then on a camera they have the exact same field of view. The exception is when you get to very wide angle lenses and some may be fisheye lenses while others are rectilinear. In that case, they will have different fields of view. You will find that you cannot buy ...


0

My understanding is that like most lens testers/reviewers other than LensRentals/Roger Cicala, DXO tests only one copy of a lens at a time. How long they keep them or whether they return or sell them I don't know. But my suspicion is that they owned different copies at the time they tested the E-PL5 and E-PL7, and the latter was a bad copy.


1

If you want you can use your 18mm focal length to construct much wider shots using software tools that joining overlapping images together. This sounds complicated, but is pretty much automated. It's also free apart from the small amount of computer time involved. It's not really suitable for dynamic scene, but some movement can be dealt with relatively ...


0

The best way to compare lenses when you are considering which one is good enough versus which one is best (but too expensive) is to look at real world images taken with each lens on cameras similar to your own. This allows you to see what may be accomplished using any particular setup. Be careful, though. It also means you can't blame the equipment when your ...


0

Would love to say there is a $20-$100 equivalent but this Sigma is my true and trusted wide angle. Sigma 8-16mm f/4.5-5.6 DC HSM FLD AF Ultra Wide Zoom Lens for APS-C sized Nikon Digital DSLR Camera. I started with the D3200 and upgraded to a D5200, D7000 and now a D7100. The lens has worked well with all of my cameras. Here are some samples taken with the ...


0

You probably already have a low-cost wide angle lens: the 18-55 kit lens. How do you fare with that at the 18mm end? If not well, then I wouldn't advise getting an ultrawide just yet, unless the "not well" translation is: "I just want to zoom out a whole lot more all the time!" Also, you need to understand that a add-on conversion lens and an actual lens ...


0

I've used both an inexpensive $20 screw on wide angle lens and my current $400 Tokina 11-16mm wide angle with a Nikon D3200. The $20 screw on lens aren't very good from my experience. The edges are very dark and often times distorted and loads of chromatic aberration, you will find yourself cropping most of the picture to get an OK quality shot. The more ...


3

Is there any way to get the stuff out from under my lens? I'm open to any ideas, even taking it apart. A non-invasive method should be the first thing you try. I'd wrap the camera in a couple layers of paper towel and then cover the towel-wrapped camera in (dry, uncooked) rice. Try to orient the camera so that gravity will keep the liquid off the lens ...


5

Both Samsung and Edmund Optics use the name "Megapixel" or "MegaPixel" to describe lenses they sell for C-mount and CS-mount cameras, but in both cases the term is used like a brand name rather than a description of any technical aspect of the lens. There's also a perceptual megapixel concept developed by DxOMark to describe lens sharpness in a way that's ...


2

Sensors are manufactured to have a certain number of megapixels. Each photosite on a sensor, either CCD or CMOS, is used to generate a pixel based on the charge accumulated as a result of light falling on the corresponding light-sensitive area. A lens is made of continuous transparent material like glass, ceramic or plastic. There are not details on it to ...


1

Lenses do not have "megapixels" – they are simply glass (or some other optically clear material such as certain plastics and crystals). Only the camera's sensor has "megapixels".


1

This is not an answer to your question, but a suggestion for your setup. In order to help minimize any extra glare or reflections off of the front of your negatives or slides, try to block out the rest of the light table. Or, create some "gobos" (black absorption panels) out of dark construction paper, or black matte-painted foam board, and use them to ...


2

Note the minimum focal distance of the 18-55mm STM is 0,25m so this is part of the limitation on what you can shoot. Photozone indicates the maximum magnification is at 55mm, which is probably what you should use regardless of "sweet spot". Distortion, CA and vignetting are best at f8 and above and resolution at f8 is as good as you'll get across the ...


8

35mm to 55mm at f/5.6 to f/8.0 will get you great results with the EF-S 18-55mm STM. I really like SLR Gear's visual interactive graphs for checking out lens image quality at various focal lengths and aperture settings. SLR Gear Lab Test Results This is what a GREAT lens looks like, and below is what a CRAP lens looks like:


0

Ok I don't really understand what he wants to do either but Philip Kendall has a point saying : The answers will be completely different for "show a few photos on my phone >to my family" and "get published in National Geographic" So Ill answer your question and give you my thoughts if it was me . A safari like that is most likely pretty expensive so ...



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