Shadowy Daisy

Shadowy Daisy
by damned-truths

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0

To rule out an issue with the software - you could check if you run the latest firmware. If not you could update it: http://av.jpn.support.panasonic.com/support/global/cs/dsc/download/ If it is hardware related, it could be that there is dirt or dust in the camera. To get rid of this you could try to get rid of it by blowing compressed air around the lens ...


0

May I suggest you try out Nikon's lens simulator, then you would be able to make an informed choice: http://imaging.nikon.com/lineup/lens/simulator/


0

If you're worried about overlap, you could always go for the Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8G AF-S instead! Seriously, overlap should not be an issue if the lens in question offers something you desire that your other lenses don't offer. In this case it is focal lengths shorter (wider) than 24mm. There's a huge difference in the field of view you get between 16mm and ...


0

There are nice tricks to change the lens quickly. I use the technique described here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ineSsjwIAqI Essentially, hold the body in one hand, the lens in the other, and use the side of the index finger holding the lens to press the "unlock" button. Just make sure you don't follow the instructions of the video till the end ;-).


0

A lot of photographers, myself included, do have a lens for all occasions in their gear but none of them can carry all of them all the time. So how do they manage that. Invariably one carries more than one body - generally two. Sometimes one uses the option of carrying a compact as a third body, depending upon what one expects to shoot and what are the ...


0

The wide end of the 16-35mm lens is very wide, but if or how frequently you use it depends on your individual way of seeing and taste. The overlap between 24-35mm is not a problem, having some overlap means that you don't have to change the lenses so frequently. For landscape, ideally, you would want a range of focal lengths at your disposal so that you ...


0

Try something like a Canon 24-70L F/2.8 or if your on a budget, maybe a old 35mm M42 prime lens with a M42 to EOS adapter. The sharpest lens Iv'e used for film making was a Zenit/Helios 58mm F2 and they normally cost around £10 GBP.


4

F-number equals the focal length of the lens divided by the diameter of the entrance pupil. Since both measurements are linear dimensions when the same units of measurement are used for both the focal length and the diameter of the entrance pupil then they cancel each other out without any further conversion. If the measurement units are dissimilar then ...


6

Sensor dimensions don't matter. F-stop is shorthand for "fractional" and what it's a fraction of is the lens focal length and the diameter of the iris and the real calculation is simply the lens focal length / diameter. 50mm lens with an iris 25mm across is at F2. So in your case, if you know the Radius then it's simply FStop = FocalLength / (Radius * 2)


0

The light transmission level may be better or less than claimed f-stop. Take the 24-105mm f/4 at 105mm really transmits light like a f/5 lens. http://www.dxomark.com/Lenses/Canon/EF24-105mm-f-4L-IS-USM-mounted-on-Canon-EOS-5DS-R---Measurements__1009 Light loss may be a factor of multiple coatings, number of elements, vignette and marketing. Also, there is ...


3

This and all similar questions are best answered by looking at websites designed for the purpose. One approach is to look at vendors like B&H Photo, which offers convenient filtering. For example, Canon EOS EF or EF-S lenses classified as "wide" or "wide zoom" with an aperture of f/1.4. Or, use a website dedicated to the task, like the Neocamera database....


0

I hear the faintest jiggle when I shake my lens (and I'm not shaking it very hard). I think my sound comes from the zoom ring moving slightly. I can feel some internal movement but I don't hear anything. For what it's worth, I bought my lens on eBay, and it's suffered some shocks since I've owned it. Nothing major. I think it's in good shape.


2

I like to know is there a binocular which uses binocular lenses as camera lenses to take picture There are binocular cameras like this Vivitar model that let you record what you see when looking through the binoculars. There are also adapters for various kinds of cameras that let you take a photo through one of the eyepieces. ...and show pictures live ...


3

It is normal to hear some clicking sound by shaking a lens, because of AF mechanism. Zoom lenses and VR make more noise because they are made of moving parts.


1

Assuming your 18-200 lens has a 77mm filter ring, then you don't need anything else to make it fit. :) If you just wanted confirmation that you are suggesting a good filter: yes, it is.


9

It looks like a Chinon 40-150mm f/3.5 zoom, correct? In either case, those are focus marks for infrared photography. Infrared light will focus at a different point than visible light, so if you want to make infrared pictures you'll use one of the red markers instead of the white mark for the focus scale. There are multiple red marks because the IR focus ...


3

Those markings are for focusing infrared. Infrared light focuses at a different point to visible light. It will also vary with zoom length. To focus at infrared on that lens you would select the mark witch matches the zoom you are using. Then you would match this mark with the correct distance from the focus ring above.


0

This is a difficult search. I found a lot of information on the Canon EF mount (largely because of Magic Lantern), and some about Nikon. Pentax is not enough of a mainstream brand to interest a lot of folks to reverse engineer the lens-camera communication, and the Pentax-Q is even a smaller subset of that. I noticed that on the Metabones FAQ page, they say, ...


0

Different focal lengths will give you more or less working room. The longer the focal length, the further you can be from your subject. Another alternative is to use old enlarger lenses, with an appropriate step up ring to get to M42 size. They actually work extremely well for macro photography, and they have no focusing helicoid, so they are made for a ...


2

Don't know exactly how useful this might be but Roger Cicala's lensrentals blog has comparison teardowns of the Canon, Nikon, and Tamron 24-70/2.8 lenses with lots of pictures. Quoting the Tamron relevant text from that article: Front Group One thing that all 3 of these lenses have in common is a large front group at the end of an extending barrel. ...


3

I think you forgot one really basic thing. Image quality. You may want a side-by-side comparison of the much older D design to the digital-era G design on a full-frame camera, such as this one on the-digital-picture.com, where the two lenses are tested on a D3x. In that comparison, mousing over the test chart crops will switch between the two test setups. ...


3

"...all Pro FX bodies have AF motor built inside the body. Hence, SWM in 'AF-S' lens is redundant." Not necessarily. The performance of camera based focus motors and lens based focus motors is far from identical. SWM lenses tend to focus faster and more quietly than their non-SWM counterparts. Add the mechanical interface between the body and lens and the ...


4

No. It's not a mount issue—it's a glass issue. Sigma's mount conversion is to change between different mount systems so it will physically mount and electronically communicate to the system of your choice. Canon EF and EF-S lenses are actually still in the same mount/signaling system. And chances are good your 17-70/2.8-4 will actually mount and ...


1

Contax/Yashica mount lenses can be adapted to Sony E-mount (not A-mount) and Panasonic/Olympus micro four-thirds and other mirrorless cameras, as well as Canon EOS-mount dSLRs. They cannot be adapted to Nikon F mount dSLRs with simple rings because of the flange distance issues, but you might be able to replace the mount with a Leitax kit; however the cost ...


1

If your lenses are for a Canon EOS they should be EF mount and they should work on Canon EOS dSLRs.


4

Does this make the lens better than an L Lens? It all depends on what way you mean when you use the word "better": Sharper at common apertures and focal lengths? At the center of the frame or over the entire field of view? Less chromatic aberration at a particular focal length and aperture? Less light falloff at a particular focal length and aperture? ...


1

Inkista's answer is comprehensive. That being said: I have an Olympus E-P5 MFT camera from 2013, and I have bought an adapter for my old OM-mount lenses that I use occasionally. Initially, my thought process was similar to yours. Experiences: Good adapters cost as much as a new kit lens. You can buy cheap adapters on Ebay. No matter what, a full-metal ...


0

If the camera cannot communicate with the lens, it cannot tell the lens to open the aperture to let the right amount of light in, and it probably will meter based on the assumption that the aperture is much wider than it actually is because it can't read the current aperture position from the lens. Bottom line: Try cleaning the contacts. If that doesn't ...


6

Hate to say it, but you're unicorn-hunting. There is no such beast. Understand that you're shooting a camera with a 2x crop factor. So, a "normal" lens is 25mm. And if you're looking at all classic film-era lenses to adapt to your camera, you're also looking at lenses from an age when 24mm was an exotic super-wide lens. And when f/2.8 was pretty much the ...


0

You'll need an adapter. The best option is to use Olympus adapter for Zuiko classic 4/3 lens. If you can live without some automatic functions, then you may also use other vendor's lenses and one of good but not cheap solutions is Metabones speed booster which will even make your lenses faster (and wider).


1

Krasnogorsk-3 has a Pentax M42x1 mount, though may be some models with Krasnogorsk bayonet mount. The lens mounted is the Meteor 5-1. f1.9 /17-69mm You can mount the M42 lens in mirrorless cameras, with the appropriate adapter. This lens was designed for 16mm film, so there are considerations using it on bigger frames. Seems not suitable for SLR as the ...



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