I Dare You!

by peter_budo

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0

Lenses from reputable third-party manufacturers, while not 100% exact copies of Nikon lenses, are designed to fit and function in the same manner and give good imaging results. They would not survive in the marketplace if their use was detrimental to the camera. I also have the Nikon D7000, and I am looking for a fast constant-aperture zoom lens. The lowest ...


2

Two reasons that jumps right out at me are size and weight. A 70-200 is pretty big, especially with a hood. To a new model, I bet it's downright intimidating. Hold that 70-200 for long, and you'll start to feel it in your hand and wrist, too. An 85mm easily solves both of those problems, assuming you want to shoot at 85.


1

Primes nearly always outperform zooms for distortion and sharpness at a given focal point as their construction is generally simpler with fewer optical elements in the light path. Zooms are, by nature, compromised as they have to be able to provide different focal lengths with as low distortion as possible, and this entails some fairly complex optical ...


0

From everything I've read about these two lenses, 1.8D may be all you need on a D600. The G has more distortion, but also rounder blades which give it smoother bokeh. So it may depend on the kind of shooting you do. The biggest upgrade with the G is that it's compatible with D3000 & 5000 series DX cameras, but that won't matter to you with your D600. ...


3

Another option that would work for some purposes (i.e. a single still image) is to stitch multiple pictures together. Since you mention a GoPro, I'm guessing this might not be what you have in mind, but it's one possible solution to the question as stated, so it should probably be included...


0

Surprisingly, fixed aperture lenses are actually the most popular in the world. Every mobile phone has a camera witch such lens, and there are far more mobile phones than full-size cameras.


2

A width of 12 units in a distance of 3 units corresponds to a horizontal angle of view of 127°. For a full-frame digital SLR with a sensor width of 36 mm, the corresponding focal length is 9 mm. You may want to consider using a fisheye lens, which typically offers a 180° diagonal angle of view or even a 180° circular fisheye image.


0

A DSLR would need aproximatly 5mm focal length lens to achieve this. Based on the "Dimensional Field of View Calculator" a 1.5x crop sensor camera would need a lens with about a 6mm focal length. A "full frame" camera would need a lens with a 9mm focal length.


2

Well, single blade itself isn't very expensive, I guess. But the additional blades require more blade mounting mechanisms and its cost is more likely significant. Moreover, always take marketing into account. Main goal of lens manufacturer is income, not better quality for lower price. Diversification of lenses helps the business running. Let's consider for ...


2

Use an F-Mount AF-S or AF-I lens to get the most from your camera. The AF-I is the older version of the current AF-S. This means the lens has an internal auto-focus motor, which the D3200 needs if you want auto-focus. You can use other lenses, but with some kind of limitation depending on the lens. A good place to check if the lens is fully compatible is ...


3

The kind of lenses you need depend a lot on what and how you like to shoot, and how limited you are by your budget. Basic features, like focal length, maximum aperture, and stabilization will be determined by your usage. See this basic guide to lenses for explanations of lens features and what they mean in practical terms. You may also want to see Lens ...


0

If your looking to upgrade ur kit lens then sigma do a 18-50 2.8 a really good affordable lens. A thing I alwas look for in a lens is auto focus af of af-s using a 3200 af lenses will not autofocus with ur camera so u will be looking for af-s lenses If you need a help handholding or you like a bit of video you can look for image stabilisation manufactures ...


0

If you want all around lens and don't want to change the lens then you can buy Nikon 18-300mm or 18-200mm lens. Kit lens 18-55mm is good general purpose lens with good quality. For portrait and landscape you can buy Nikon 16-85mm lens. For telephoto you can buy 70-300mm if you are on tight budget or you can buy 70-200 f4 or f2.8 if you can afford it.


0

This chip can accomplish three tasks: Aperture control from the camera Instead of setting the aperture via the aperture ring, the chip communicates enough information (maximum aperture) for the camera to accurately meter. The D3x00 and D5x00 bodies, in particular, cannot perform stop-down metering without this information and would not meter accurately ...


1

It does not affect the focal length or angle of view or anything else. That "designed for crop sensor" statement means that it will be smaller (lighter, cheaper) and produce a smaller image circle that won't fully cover a full-frame sensor. So if you are able to mount it on a full-frame you will see severe vignetting.


2

The advertised focal length is the actual focal length of the lens and not the Full frame equivalent focal length. The focal lengths are reported like this as the focal length of a lens is a physical property of the lens that is not changed by the size of the surface onto which it projects an image.


1

Yes. Just make sure that you buy the Canon mount version for this lens, as third party lens makers generally also make versions with mounts for Nikon and other camera brands.


0

The EF or EF-s version of this lens will work on your camera, or any ASP-C Canon EOS DSLR, or the EOS M, with a separate adapter (the EF-s to EF-m adapter). The lens will be able to be attached to other Canon DSLRs (i.e. 1D, 5D, or 6D) but extreme vignetting (i.e. very dark corners of the image, possible extending a significant distance into the image) will ...


1

The complexity in disassembling a lens is not necessarily only in the disassembly (however there are indeed potential pitfalls there). The biggest question you should be asking yourself is: Can you recollimate it once you've cleaned the lens and reassembled it? With a single element removal, you might be fine, but if you disassemble more than that, you might ...


0

Don't know Olympus construction but Canon is using plastic rings which holds lens elements and these rings are glued together (most probably ultrasonic welded). You can disassembly that by lathe with precision approach but question is how you will assemble it concentric.


1

I'm afraid what you are describing sounds like a physical problem with the camera or lens. There is a metal lever on the back of a D lens that closes the aperture, and it should move freely. It sounds like either the camera is not moving the lever properly, or that part of the lens mechanism is broken. You could troubleshoot the problem by testing the ...


0

You noted that aperture is changing, could you confirm aperture change by visual (look into lens during shoots) and also by EXIF data? If aperture is changing itself without camera intervention it could be following: 1. damaged spring in aperture system, can be inspected, replaced... 2. broken flex cable. or Nearly broken and sometimes is conducting and ...


2

It probably uses the electrical contacts in post-AI bodies to tell the camera the maximum aperture of the lens so the camera can calculate correct exposure. light levels are measured with the lens at max aperture, the camera needs to know what that is so it can work out how many stops to reduce aperture. Or to set speed in aperture-priority mode. The ...


0

The tubes are for closer focusing than the lens normally allows, and the order in which you mount them doesn't really matter at all. When you put a tube in place, it moves the lens further away from the camera's sensor/film plane, so the lens will no longer focus at infinity. The more tubes you put in place, or the longer the tube (if you're using the ...


4

It will work. Any EF lens will mount on any EOS camera - as long as it's not EF-S or EF-M (which the 50mm f/1.8 isn't). In addition, MP-E and TS-E lenses will also mount and work on any EOS camera.


0

This is old question but problem is still actual on old lenses. What you need is protocol interface which converts aperture change command from camera to lens. Please see my article at this link where is problem cause and it's solution described in detail ...


0

You don't have to replace the mount and can get away with a simple ring adapter if you adapt the lens to a mount with a shallower registration with mirrorless cameras, such as Sony NEX, Fuji X, Canon EOS M, or micro four-thirds. For mirror clearance with a Canon prosumer full frame, you can also, if you don't care about resale of the camera, and want to use ...


-1

I have the Nikon F mount camera and an old Minolta Maxxum camera with two lenses, they do make an adapter that you can use to attach to the camera, but then you have the aperture to deal with, since it's automatic as well, there is no ring to manually adjust and there lies the dilemma.


0

I would avoid picking up a new zoom, but rather look at some fast primes. If you can get a fairly wide angle prime with a large aperture (like a 35mm f1.4 - my Sigma Art lens is my favorite!) you will have a much easier time shooting indoors and I think you'd find that the images are of better quality.


1

If it's low-light work you're primarily intending to do then the f2.8 lenses are a better option as they are an f-stop brighter than the Canon 24-105 f4L. Image stablisation can only do so much and having a wider aperture will give you a head start in low-light environments, making IS less necessary. Also bear in mind you're less likely to need IS at wider ...


8

That looks like fungus. Here's some information from the Zeiss website regarding fungus. If it is fungus you may be able to halt its progress with an ultraviolet light source (removing the lens and placing it in strong sunlight is one thing to try). If it's not affecting your images too badly then live with it as fungus can permanently and irreparably damage ...


1

I know its starting to be an old post, but ive had the 10mm 2.8 Samyang lens. I will recommend it. Its just an amazing lens. Ive used it with my canon 70d.


1

There is an app for IOS called PhotoPills. Input shooting parameters, then using your phone's camera it uses augmented reality to project the point of hyperfocal distance.


5

I think the problem here is that you assume focal length is all (or the most important factor) you need to look at when choosing a new lens. It isn't. Your other problem is assuming that a lens is going to solve your problems. It may not. All things being equal, getting a walkaround superzoom when you already have a "twin kit" of a wide-to-normal/short ...


9

Your edit adds some clarification: you have trouble shooting indoors. Typically when shooting indoors and fighting tight spots means you need a wider lens. If the 18-55 isn't wide enough, then the 18-140 is going to be no different -- they are both 18 mm at the wide end. In other words, the 18-140 won't help that situation; the 16-85 is a bit wider, so that ...


1

I'm guessing from your mention of the 18-140mm that you're using Nikon gear. The 16-85mm should make an excellent "everyday" lens that covers many situations, and offer a useful upgrade from the 18-55mm kit lens. It should be wide enough for indoor work, landscapes etc., and long enough so you won't be wanting to fit your 55-300 every time you need a ...


2

At the moment, this question reads to me like a case of Gear Acquisition Syndrome: the first thing to do is to work out why you want a new lens, and then pick a lens which lets you do that. Buying a lens for the sake of buying a lens has a high risk of just throwing money away. I'd suggest sitting down, working out how your current equipment is holding you ...


1

Canon teleconverters won't fit because they have a protruding front element that needs a corresponding recess in the host lens, which only the Canon L-series teles have, but third-party ones from Tamron and others should fit. Not Sigmas, they have similar design to the Canons. Optical quality is another matter, it is usually desireable to stop down a bit to ...


3

Both Canon 1.4x and 2x extenders work - more information here (search within the page for extender). Additionally, fitting this on a 1.6x crop-sensor body will give an equivalent of 38.4mm focal length. This route would avoid the incorrect aperture reporting issues, and potentially offer better image quality than when using an extender - if you happen to ...


2

Canon now makes two pancake lenses for the EOS mount. Both are just slightly wider than "normal", f/2.8, metal builds, and come with the STM focus motor. Both have reviewed quite well for sharpness and overall image quality; see the-digital-picture.com reviews for the 40/2.8 and the 24/2.8. The EF 40mm f/2.8 STM is for full-frame cameras. The EF-S 24mm ...


1

Resolution is a complex thing. For one, there is a LOT of misinformation about resolution floating around the net, and many photographers do not quite understand it. First, I believe it is incorrect to say "A outresolves B" when talking about lenses and sensors. Sensors do not outresolve lenses. Neither do lenses outresolve sensors. As a matter of fact, the ...


1

Remember for the camera LP/MM , you can only see those linepairs if they are completely aligned with the pixels. Therefore it is good to oversample like in audio sampling. For example, if you need to sample a 20kHz sine wave, you can be lucky with 40kHz to capture the positive and negative peak, or you can be unlucky and capture only zeroes. So it is good to ...


1

It does look a bit like a tilt-shift lens, but I wouldn't be 100% positive. I'd say it was taken with a 50mm/<1.2 lens on a full-frame sensor. With a 35mm and an APS-C sensor you would need to be closer to the subject in order to achieve that field of depth. A flash might have been used, but I think you do not need any for that kind of shot.


7

I'm going to take a wildass blind guess, but doing an image search on Google which led to WrongRob's Instagram and then his website, it looks like he shoots with a Leica M, which has a full frame sensor in it. So my guess would be that the thin depth of field may have been created with a Noctilux 50mm f/0.95 lens. Whatever apertures he's using, if he's ...


0

If you want shallow depth of field, you need 3 things: wide aperture, long focal length, large sensor (eg. full 35mm frame or 120/220 film). Out of those, only aperture can be varied freely, because both sensor size and focal length show on angle of view, changing your composition. Longer focal length and larger sensor somewhat cancel each other. This sadly ...


4

The lens used would have a reasonably large aperture (low F number). This gives the effect of a relatively narrow depth of field and also allows more light to get to the sensor, making it easier to capture a correctly exposed image. The focal length used would be in the 'normal' range (somewhere around 50mm for Full Frame, or 30mm on APS-C), as opposed to ...


3

I have had this happen twice on my D800. To release the lens is simple. There is a service port, or cut-out, that is visible in front of the lens release. A thin bladed screw driver inserted into this port, with the lens or body turning at the same time will separate the two. If nothing else, you now only have to send the body into Nikon. I feel the pin in ...


-1

When both APS-C and a full frame have a lens that caters for both having the same angle of view it results in both having different perspective even though having the same angle in horizontal sense. It means that if the full frame has a 50mm, which is the focal length for viewing perspective as the human eye does, the APS-C will need smaller focal length to ...


2

That is a Canon FD mount lens. While you could find an adapter to mount it on a D3200, it's problematic, even for adapting onto a Canon dSLR. The main problem here is the registration distance. This is the distance that the lens is held by the mount away from the image plane (the sensor, in the case of a dSLR). This distance varies between mount systems, ...


1

That is an FD lens which was made for Canon. You'll need to purchase an FD to F mount, which you should be able to find on ebay for less than $50. I'd advise you get one with glass so you can continue to focus to infinity.



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