Moonlight

by Jakub

submit your photo


Hall of Fame
View past winners from this year

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Tag Info

New answers tagged

-2

I would suggest to stick with the kit lens for portraits. The maximum aperture of 18-55 is f 3.5 which is good for the bokeh effect. Also the kit lens has VR II. On the other hand if you purchase 55-300 without a VR (assuming as not specified in the question) it will be difficult to get sharp images as you will experience camera shake if you don't have ...


2

It should be OK but not great for portraits. Its a decent lens for its price but still entry level. So, I don't think you will like it much better than your kit lens for portraits. Many shooters look for a portrait lens that: Has a focal length around 80-110mm on a full-frame sensor* A wide aperture A nice look to out-of-focus background (the bokeh you ...


2

On the side, VR II lens has "II" in the lower line, after max aperture values and letter G - AF-S Nikkor 55-200mm 1:4-5.6GII ED. The letters "VR II" can also be read around front element - 55-200mm 1:4-5.6G ED VR II: The earlier version has the side marking missing the II and no text around front element at all. Also, VR is a separate red marking rather ...


3

The full frame camera will generally give more distortion than a crop body camera with the same wide angle lens because the wider angle of view obtained with a FF camera includes the edges that are cropped when using the same lens with an APS-C camera. Cropping the FF camera's image to get the same Field of View (FoV) as the APS-C camera will yield the same ...


5

I think this is an "apples and oranges" comparison - of you use the same lens on a full frame and a crop camera, you get different fields of view, so it's not really meaningful to compare which has more distortion. That said, the literal answer to your question is using the lens on a full frame camera, as you're then using the full extent of the lens's ...


1

This type of question/answer might be better gotten from a camera manufacturer. For general answers check you tube. http://www.digitalcameraworld.com/2012/06/29/how-different-types-of-lenses-see-the-world/ How Lens are made: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special_effect


1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BNG7ia8cl2s This is a link to a really good Utube clip, which explains in simple terms how different camera lens's work.


0

My camera did the exact same thing and I found out my switch on my lens was on the M instead of the A I switches it back and all is good! :)


1

An extension tube won't work because the amount of extension needed would limit you to only Macro photos. You would only be able to focus a few inches in front of the lens. A 1.4x or 1.5x teleconverter will work. Depending on the lens, you may need a 2x teleconverter to completely eliminate the vignetting at all focal lengths.


2

To increase the 28.8mm image circle cast by the APS-C lens to the 43.2mm image circle needed by the FF sensor, you would need to increase the focal length by a factor of 0.5, or one-half again. A 24mm lens would require a 12mm extension tube. A 50mm lens would require a 25mm extension tube. A 100mm lens would require a 50mm extension tube, and so on. That is ...


1

From a long time back when I was looking into film astrophotography (and the hype around hyping film - never did get into it) there was a website that I can no longer find that had tests of various films and their spectral sensitivity. There are a few very important frequencies of light such as 656nm that astro-photographers are very concerned about. The ...


1

It's true that most lenses don't transmit very much UV light, however, it's not true that only quartz lenses are suitable for UV photography. You can also use enlarging lenses, and even some modern pancake lenses can work pretty well. You can find my previous answer to a similar question, with a bit more detail here: Are there cheaper alternatives to ...


4

Yes... kind of. You'll be projecting the image to a larger size. If you move the lens out by a 1/3 of focus distance using extensions, shouldn't you gain the full frame image? With possible loss of infinity focus? Putting 35mm of extension on a 100mm lens or 10mm of extension on a 30mm lens isn't just a "you can't focus at infinity" but takes you well ...


0

Your sensor is going to make a big determination of what your picture will come out as. If you have a junk sensor then lenses won't help. If your first lens is scratched, then you're still going to have a scratch. However, if I have a cheap lens and a good lens on the same body then I'll only see a quality difference if the sensor could detect those ...


0

It could, in the case where you would otherwise use the "digital zoom" provided by the camera interface, which really just crops the image, and always results in lower quality. If the extra lens is low quality, though, you could just be trading one kind of image degradation for another. Also, depending on what you mean by "image quality", a polarizing ...


2

I'll assume that you are talking about very low light scenes with exposure times of typically say 5 seconds plus. If not, please advise. If that is a Vibration Correction (VC) lens the VC feature should be turned OFF when on a tripod. The VC feature tries to "correct" vibration that ideally is not there and makes extra vibration! Do not touch the camera ...


1

I presume by "night photography" that you mean starts etc.? It's important to set your camera focus manually and to infinity ∞ to take pictures of the night sky. Another important matter is that if you was to take the picture on a long exposure using the shutter button that you would move the camera slightly. If you're not already doing so, you should use a ...


4

Yes, that set of lenses makes sense together, and I'd recommend keeping the 22mm. You already know that the 10-18 is a good ultrawide lens, and the 40/2.8 STM can do the same only-slightly-tele duty it would have on your dSLR. But the EF-M 22mm f/2 will offer you two things neither of those other lenses can: f/2 max. aperture, and compactness. Despite the ...


3

I'll leave aside the issue of the adaptor and just focus on the focal lengths. In short, this is a fine set for a lot of photography. The Canon M cameras feature an APS-C sized sensor. That means the 10-18mm is an ultrawide-to-wide zoom; if wide angle is your thing, this is pretty essential. (On the other hand, if that's not your thing, this lens might not ...


0

Pretty much any lens can focus at infinity, so I think to make sense, the question must mean maximum distance so that the image of subject is a usable size instead of a dot. Which is going to be hard for anyone else to judge, but a Field Of View Calculator should answer for individual purposes. See http://www.scantips.com/lights/fieldofview.html The Field ...


-1

I have a cheap Canon adapter that I use with my Canon lenses - even the old manual focus FD lens works great


0

The question here is really "Are there third-party lenses which will work on the Nikon D3300?", which is only answered by the other "possible duplicate" question in passing, because it starts from the assumption of incompatible mount, when actually third-party manufacturers do produce Nikon-mount lenses — although Sony and Canon do not. (Sigma is the only ...


1

I am not sure what the spectral transmission of glass is at 250nm but you can test the transmission by using a spectroradiometer. You can point the radiometer at a test light source and measure its spectral power distribution. Then place the test lens between the source and the radiometer and measure it again. Divide the two measurements to get the ...


3

I owned the "push-pull" 80-200, updated that to the 80-200 ED, then eventually purchased a 70-200 off a friend who was downsizing to mirrorless. So I've had all three. The 80-200 has a few disadvantages to the 70-200 VR, but it is a perfectly fine lens to use on a modern camera. It lacks some modern features like VR and AF-S, so maybe a little outdated, ...


2

Maybe. This lens is made for Canon, Pentax, Sigma, Sony/Minolta, and Nikon mounts. You would need the Nikon version — F-mount. However, do also note that it won't autofocus on your camera, as the D5100 does not have the focus motor necessary to drive it.


2

Yes. The EMF chip, when correctly positioned and glued to an adapter ring will perform autofocus confirmation and communicate EXIF lens information (focal length, max. aperture, and even the aperture setting used--if you follow the correct steps while shooting) on a digital Canon EOS body (I've used them on an XT, 50D, and 5DMkII). The adapter ring and the ...


0

Angle of view is actually three different angles (diagonal, horizontal/landscape, and vertical/portrait), each of which is the measure of the angle at the top of an equilateral triangle measured from the focal point of the lens (where all the light rays cross) and spanning from the farthest points (corner-to-corner, left-to-right, or top-to-bottom) across a ...


0

Could you post a 100% crop (central part) of an image you considering blurred? Sidenote: why not use a kit Nikkor 18-55mm DX, it has same lame f/3.5-5.6 but adds VR and longer tele (~70mm equivalent for nice portraits) for less money. Also I believe there is no 50mm DX lens in existence. I personally played with D3100/18-55VR couple of weeks ago and I ...


1

Screw-driven autofocus lenses tend to have very short throws to enable the motor in the camera to get through the entire focus range quickly. The trade-off for this is that it takes a very small amount of angular movement in the focus ring to pass through the zone where the AF system thinks the focus is correct. The body is capable of the very minute ...


1

Get a set of cheap screw Nikon G extension tubes from eBay. The part with the lens mount can be unscrewed from the rest of the tubes and mounted to the lens. This allows you to easily control the aperture, plus should provide a male filter thread that you can screw filters onto. (The set I purchased has a rather unusual 57 mm thread, and while it looks like ...


2

By buying from another country, you are effectively buying on the gray market (related: Is there a drawback in buying an imported (gray market) lens?). You will find it difficult to make use of a warranty or in some cases, even authorized repair shops will be hesitant to touch it. You are also going to pay... what appears to be $27 for shopping in this ...


3

The reversing ring such as the BR2A (Nikon, B&H) have a Nikon F mount on one side and a thread that matches the front of a camera lens on the other. Nikon doesn't make any 72mm or 67mm reverse rings though you can find it from third parties (72mm for example). I will point out that lenses that use a 72mm (or 67mm) thread are not likely good candidates ...


0

Your camera model doesn't matter. All you need is a Nikon mount reverse ring with the correct size filter threads. What size is the filter thread on your lens?


4

Your confusion is understandable. The lenses are very similar indeed, as noted in comparison / review by Thom Hogan. On Nikkor lenses, "IF" is an acronym for internal focusing - so that using polarizing filters should be easier with the IF-ED lens. But the most significant (and costly) difference is actually considered to be VR, standing for Vibration ...


5

There are 14 points to the star. This points to one specific option of doing it in camera. The lens has 7 blades. The diffraction spikes formed by the lens form at two spots for each blade, one major one and one minor one 180 degrees from the major one. You will notice that every other star point is shorter than its neighbors. As I said, this points to ...


1

You could, in a REALLY amateur method pick up black paperboard and precisely cut out a circle in the center to obtain a smaller aperture, but of course this is a really rough way and no high quality at all can be expected. The cut paperboard, if it is thin enough and the outer circle is cutt precisely, can be placed inside the bottom of the lens between the ...


1

What lens you chose really depends on two things; what composition you desire and the space you have to shoot in. I can't tell you the answer to either. Since you have a bit of time to adjust your shot before the guests arrive I think that the best answer is to simply take advantage of that. Bring a friend along who can stand in position and try out your ...


0

In general, fixed focal length lenses are critical, if you are unsure about the distance to the subject you want to capture. So if you cannot choose the distance arbitrarily or if the subject is moving fast towards the camera, you are likely to have trouble using your 90mm F2.8 though it is the best lens for bad light conditions. If you want to shoot ...


0

I finally managed to an article related to my questions. Apparently what was improved in the newer version was: Zoom lock button SIC – Super Integrated Coating. Source


0

I recently picked up an SLR Zoom with the ball head to use with my Canon T5i for taking macro photos outside. It's not perfect, and it can get pretty finicky for stability if you have the camera too much off level. It's good in a pinch (and infinitely better than hand-holding for macro work), but using either a long timer or a remote becomes critical, and ...


1

If you look towards the front element it will say STM:



Top 50 recent answers are included