Napioa - Wind Origins

Napioa - Wind Origins
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1

Don't buy a film SLR camera just because it is cheap. Almost any film SLR is going to be dirt cheap these days simply because no one wants them. Once you buy the film and pay for processing and printing you will quickly discover that you no longer have a "cheap" camera. Even if you are prepared to pay for the film costs, the $25 Vivitat 3000S would not ...


2

The Nikon AF 70-300mm F4-5.6 ED D was a fair lens back in the day, but the problem you'll have now is that it's not an AF-S lens -- meaning it doesn't have an autofocus motor built in -- and will therefore be manual-focus only on the 5300.


1

Remember that a true weather sealing is stamped with a certification grade like IP 67. Unless you have this kind of statement, the "weather sealing" remains more or less a marketing argument saying "we have added some more sealing gaskets but you still use it under the rain at your own risks", because it does not say how much it is sealed. It gives you no ...


0

BTW, I dunno if you are considering plastic bags in addition to or in lieu of weatherproofing. Using them often produces condensation (and of course occasional leaks) so once again the weatherproofing can come in handy. Zoom lenses and some lens when focusing also draw in or expel air when moving, so watch out for that when using your equipment in messy ...


1

I believe the answer to be simple. Nikon does not warranty their product if it is used in the rain. I have a few Nikon DSLRs and I love them. But, for rainy conditions, I purchased a Pentax K-50 touted by Pentax to be weather proof. I also have two weather resistant (WR) Pentax Lenses. Don't sell Pentax short. Look at the features. I have used the Pentax ...


2

This depends on the make and model of lens. But often 'HD' means it is specifically designed for recording HD video. So features will often include: power zoom fast focusing, and focus tracking image stabilisation smooth aperture changes quiet operation Not all of these features will apply for every HD lens. Though optimised for video, some of this ...


0

What does it mean when 'HD' is printed on a lens? Excellent question. My answer: Absolutely nothing. We all know what "HD" stands for, but what does it mean with respect to lenses? Well, there is no consensus among manufacturers as to what the "HD" label means. They are free to put a "HD" label on any lens they want (and they do; many cheap add-on ...


4

Yes, the two letters together mean High Definition. It is just a marketing term like many others. Pentax at some point changed the coatings on 5 of their lenses and added HD to their names and changed a color around the edge from green to red. You will find the press release for the coating here. There is a copy of the press release for the lenses here. ...


2

I have several answers. 1) Use whatever lens you want (or can). You are limited not by a lens, but on the actual space you have in front of your board. If you have the board on a tight space, you will probably need a wide angle lens, but if the board is on the middle of a manufacturing plant, you can use a telephoto lens to minimize spherical distortion. ...


0

The moon, and stars and the milky way etc, will require quite different lenses. If you want to take images of the stars, you need a wide, fast (very low F-stop, generally lower then F/2.8) lens. You can get passable images of the milky way with a kit 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 however it is not great because you'll have to raise your ISO to compensate for a ...


1

A macro lens will be the best option, because macro lenses have very good corner to corner sharpness and very little distortion. Any macro lens will do, however choose one with at working distance best suite to your use, my guess will be around 60mm or so.


0

You can use Adapter AV15-III or AV15-II for Voigtlander 15mm f4, it fit on Bombo holder name Laser100


0

They are made by Cosina Japan, none of that Zeiss moved this and that. they are made in the same plant Voigtlander lenses are made of and same glass. Difference is in the aesthetics and looks. You want a german made lens then buy a Leica. still made in Germany. With Leica you get what you pay for. Zeiss you still get a great lens but not what they use to be. ...


2

Keep the 18-55 IS II and 55-250 IS. The 1200D is a stripped down budget camera bundled with striped down budget lenses. The lenses that came with your XSi are actually superior to the the 1200D kit lenses. The 18-55 III has the same optics as the 18-55 IS II but lacks Image Stabilization. The 75-300 USM has poor optics and lacks Image Stabilization. ...


2

If the lenses are not currently made to mount on Nikon DSLR bodies (i.e., Nikon F-mount), then no, you probably cannot buy an adapter to use them on your Nikon body. The reason for this is that Nikon's F-mount has one of the largest flange focal distances (also known as registration distance) for currently-available DSLR bodies on the market. I believe your ...


1

I'm sure there are a multitude of such lists. And every one of them is probably different from every other one of them. Well, unless it has been plagiarized from one of the other list writers. There is, however, no such list universally recognized as definitive. (This statement is based upon my own personal history in photography over the last 35 years or ...


2

I would say you want a telephoto lens. If you want a scan-like image, being far away with a long lens is your best bet, as it will preserve the rectilinearity of your subject. I don't know exactly how long a lens you'd need to get no noticeable distortion, but if it were me I would use my 100mm prime. Edit: another option would be to shoot with a wide angle ...


0

The 35mm Prime Lens will always have a better image than a 18-55mm, and I would suggest if would use to shoot Portraits exclusively. Since It won't be wide enough for group photos/landscape or architecture. Being a Nikon user myself. I would go over the line and say that it would be a crime not to get the kit lens especially if its VR-II. since the quality ...


4

portrait, landscape, macro If these are the kinda of photography you intend on doing then maybe the kit lens is the better choice over the 35 prime. I assume you are going with the 55-200 regardless so the debate really comes down to the 35 prime V.S. the kit lens on a D3300. I happen to own both the kit lens and the 35mm on my D3300 so ill discuss some ...


1

I am planning to buying an entry level Nikon DSLR (perhaps the D3300). I read around and decided to buy the body only, excluding the kit lens. Hum. I do not know on what basis you have decided to exclude the kit lens. It is an entry level camera, and entry level lens, but that does not mean it is a toy lens. It is a good enough lens for an entry level ...


2

Do you have "Auto Dx crop" enabled? If so, try disabling the "Auto DX crop" setting. Photo Shooting Menu > Image area > Choose image area > Auto DX crop. Change Auto DX crop to Off (if it's On). You can still manually change the sensor area between Full and DX, and even assign that setting to a quick menu setting so it is easier to access. As Mike Sowsun ...


4

It depends. This is why getting a blanket lens recommendation almost never works. Everybody has a different set of priorities on what and how they want to shoot and how much they have to spend. Getting a 35/1.8 and a telephoto could work really well for you. It also might not. Whether or not you "need" the kit zoom depends. The main thing to keep in mind ...


0

The camera lens is made of various lens elements. If it consisted of only a single simple lens, the image produced is degraded by 7 major defects called aberrations. Additionally the one called a color aberration has two different errors. Aberrations are mitigated by constructing the lens using several lens elements. Each has a different shape (power) and ...


6

35mm is not wide enough for many types of general photography. With any group shots, (especially indoors) or any large outdor landscape scenes, you will need something like 16mm to 18mm to get everything in the frame. The easiest way to accomplish this is by going with the 18-55mm kit lens. I don't know what you read but todays kit lenses are much better ...


1

I go for a Tamron 16-300mm all purpose lens combined with a fast portrait prime like a 50mm f/1.8. The 55-200mm f/4-5.6G is a specialised lens, new user won't use very much, and you will miss the more useful focal lengths (16-50mm on APS-C or 24-70mm on FF). Prime are good but specialised as well, and not for everyday use for beginners. Note: D330 ...


1

The Nikon ED AF-S VR-NIKKOR 70-200mm 1:2.8G combined with a 2x teleconverter is probably the best choice overall, I have the Sigma 50-500mm myself, it very heavy, and it's very dark. The VR/IS is fair but you will still need good light, if you wish to keep ISO down. It's soft on the long end, so 70-200 2.8 with a teleconverter will probably be round the ...


1

For ~ U$350 there's this: http://kodakpixpro.com/Americas/cameras/actioncam/sp360/ - Video and Photos, F2.8 Lens. One Camera does 214°, but you can buy two and the link themselves for 360° VR. We need to know your Budget if you want pricey answers. That Camera shoots: Still, Burst Shot, Movie, Time Lapse, Loop Recording, & has WiFi - with WiFi you can ...


0

Get a Cokin P-series filter holder. The P-series works with lenses up to 82mm in thread size. You'll need an adapter ring for each thread size with which you plan to use the filter holder. Good adapter rings are available from third party sellers at very affordable prices, so 77mm, 67mm, 58mm, and 52mm adapter rings will allow you to use P-series sized ...


6

Adaptors to reduce the filter thread of a lens are a bad idea. They cause vignetting (dark areas in the corners). You might get away with a reduction of 2mm as different brands standardise on different sizes. Some kit lenses have bigger threads than they need so that the manufacturer needs to support fewer standard sizes. Apart from these 2 cases your not ...


3

I live in Alaska and have shot assignments involving bears for the US Forest Service and the NY Times [ for example ]. In Alaska photographing bears can mean many things. If you end up someplace like Brooks Camp in Katmai, you can actually get quite close to the bears because you are shooting from platforms around habituated animals. Other places you will ...


5

Sometimes the circumstance under which you are shooting trumps distinctions between the optical quality of one lens over another, even when there is significant difference in the optical quality of the lenses in question. This is one of those times. When shooting subject matter such as bears in the wilds of Alaska, focal length is the key consideration. ...


2

It is important whether you use it with a crop or a full frame camera and where in Alaska you go. But in general 200 or even 300 mm is not enough. Get the longest lens, do research and make reservations.


3

We can rule out the 70-300 right off. It's noisy and not great optically. I would take the 70-200 Nikkor as it's got good glass, big aperture and VR but is no good for landscape shots. The Sigma will handle the wide and very long ends but you are right that the compromises needed to make a 50-500 lens are going to result in poorer images. That really ...


6

I'd say that if you have to ask which lens would be most suitable, you're probably going to want the range of the Sigma 50-500mm. The 70-200mm f/2.8 is the best of the lenses you listed. The 70-300mm D has gone through a couple updates over the years, so compared to the other 2, it's a bit dated. But because you're not exactly sure of what you'll be seeing, ...


0

While not exhaustive, these are the terms for lens types I've run into: Prime vs. Zoom A prime lens is a lens with a fixed focal length. A zoom lens is a lens with a variable focal length. Simple as that. Wide, Normal, Telephoto These designations are about the focal length that the lens has: short, medium, and long, respectively. In full-frame ...


1

There is an old Sigma lens for Nikon (about 20 years old) that gives a blurred image when viewed through. If you're just looking through the lens with your eye, the image may simply be out of focus. The same is true if you're trying to take a photo with it -- given its age, it's may not be an autofocus lens, in which case you'll have to focus manually ...


-1

First we need to define “normal” as to focal length. This is because wide-angle and telephoto are referenced from this value. All cameras can be fitted with a “normal” lens. Such a lash-up delivers an angle of view of about 45⁰. We are talking about a camera that yields a rectangular image. The 45⁰ angle of view results when the camera is held horizontal ...


2

Think of those as qualifiers, not types because they are not mutually exclusive: Relative to viewing-angle, lens can be called: Ultra-Wide, Wide-Angle, Normal, Telephoto, Super-Telephoto. These terms are not absolute either in that a lens can be wide-angle when mounted on one camera and normal or ultra-wide on another, depending if the sensor is relatively ...


0

The Nikon P900 has a 1/2.3" sensor size. The lenses on these "point-and-shoot" cameras are much smaller, much easier to design and build, and therefore much cheaper. The lenses can be smaller because the sensors are much smaller on point-and-shoot cameras. Source: lensvid.com


1

Leaving the 28mm behind seems more useful than leaving the 21mm. If you're hand printing you can crop much more easily than stitching (I could crop in printing when I did my own years ago). While you do magnify the film grain this way, that's only an issue if you were printing almost as big as possible anyway. The down side of this approach is that your ...


3

The difference between 21mm and 28mm doesn't sound like all that much. But as focal lengths get shorter the difference per millimeter in focal length gets larger. In theory a 21mm lens should yield about a one third wider field of view than a 28mm lens. For a 35mm film camera that would be the difference between a 75º diagonal FoV for the 28mm lens and a ...


4

Ill throw some advice in there (I also happen to be a pilot) Instrument Lights: Unless you are shooting some kind of piper cub or something chances are the instrument panel is lit its self. Don't be afraid to use the instrument lights during the day to add some fill light. The type of lights vary by aircraft but you may be able to make the instruments ...


3

It really is a personal decision. Myself, I would bring the 28mm only and stitch together multiple images to get a wider shot if necessary. While backpacking I'm much more concerned with weight than the few extra minutes a stitch will take to capture and create later in post.


0

I recently bought myself a Peak Design Slide shoulder strap. This one is attached to camera or lens with small anchors. I attached two anchors on the lens (one on a Arca-Swiss compatible plate, included with the strap). And I attached to anchors in the middle of the screw of the tripod clamp (I don't know correct english word for that). With this setup, I ...


1

Op-Tech's Lens Loop is one such product that has connectors that allow them to be used with a plethora of straps they offer. Use of the loop allows a quick release plate to remain attached to the lens' tripod foot. I have not personally used the Lens Loop myself. I do use the Op-Tech system and have been very happy with both a Canon Professional Services ...


3

To get rid of nasty reflections from glass surfaces a really great thing to do is crossing polarizer filters on flash and lens. In practice, you put a polarizer foil (can be found in broken lcd panels for example if you don't want to buy it) on the flash and then turn the polarizer on your lens until the affect is achieved as much as you like it. Watch out, ...


3

I'll use a tripods and take multiple exposures shoots for HDR (natural looking HDR, not the cartoonish kind). Then composed the shoots so all the instruments are clear and in focus, but also thanks to HDR allows the viewer to see though the windows. I'll reduce reflections by using a polarising filter, and being on a tripods the reduction in light doesn't ...


0

I'll recommend the Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8, it's a very good all-purpose lens for FF. Any zoom will be a compromise compared to your prime 50mm f/1.8, but obviously you gain some flexibility.


0

I'm using my kit lens AF-S NIKKOR 24-120mm f/4G ED VR with Nikon D750, and I'm very happy with it. This lens will give you both Wide as well as Telephoto experience. It produce very good and sharp images. You can try it. Happy Photography!!! Regards, Vikas Aggarwal


4

The 35mm film camera format has been with us since 1924 when the German Leica was introduced. The image size (format size) measures 24mm height by 36mm length. Now digital cameras are replacing film cameras. Most were built to house a digital imaging chip that has the same format size. These are called full frame cameras. As technology marches on it has ...



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