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by garik

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1

The action of zooming the lens is nearly identical to the action of reloading a pump-action shotgun: slide the barrel forward and backward. Back in the days before autofocus this was the preferred zoom lens mechanism. The two-ring lenses required you to move your hand between the zoom ring and the focus ring which took time. Some preferred the precision of ...


0

If you don't know what lenses you need and why, don't buy anything. That goes for any camera equipment. The variety of equipment available is immense, as is the range of what it can do and what it is suited for. When you are unhappy with your current equipment, then look into equipment that will solve your then-current issues. I used an 18-200 until the ...


2

Here is an example image of a 'pump zoom', this is the Canon 100-400mm IS USM:


12

It just means you push / pull the front of the lens to zoom, rather than twisting a zoom ring. The mechanism is simpler to design/manufacturer but is less precise and has a reputation for sucking dust into the lens due to the large change in volume when zooming.


1

Depending on your budget, any 18-55mm f2.8 would be a good all in one lens. You will be able to get fairly wide shots capturing Mother, Baby, children and surrounding at the 18mm end whereas and at the 55mm end, you will be able to take some really nice close ups of the baby. The f2.8 (specially if you can stretch to a lens that is f2.8 through the lens ...


0

I have recently used this lens and having a copy of the old lens, I could instantly see the difference in quality. The images are sharper towards the edges (way Sharper). I tested in backlit situations, and the purple fringing is way way reduced compare to the older model. The copy of the lens that I have, produced a slightly colder tint compared to the ...


5

Any EF lens can be used on one of Canon's full-frame cameras. Generally, when Canon makes a newer version of a lens, it's because there can either be improvements to the optical design, or they can make a cheaper version of the lens. With Ls, it's usually the former. The Mk I version of the 14L came out in 1991. The Mk II version in 2007, so you ...


4

First off, all EF lenses (L or otherwise) can be mounted on a Canon 5D. Nothing about the L precludes it from being mounted on other bodies, nor only the higher end bodies being restricted to only L lenses. The difference between the two (and I'm working from Ken Rockwell's review at Canon 14mm f/2.8 L II) Heavier (4oz heavier than the original) Built in ...


0

While the question has actually already been well answered, I just wanted to mention the term flange focal distance (also called flange to film distance), see e.g. Wikipedia. Basically, the camera manufacturers as Nikon and Canon have developed their first DSLR's using image sensors smaller than the illuminated film area of 135 film. As they did not want to ...


1

Minolta MD/MC (like Canon FD/FL) are not usable on dSLR/dSLT bodies without an adapter with an optical element in it to act like a short teleconverter so you can achieve focus to infinity. And a cheap one will be likely to have cheap glass, and can reduce image quality. A simple ring adapter will limit the focus capability of the lens to less than infinity, ...


0

Those aberration that you mention can indeed be compensated for in software to an amazing extent. However, there's no free lunch. Correction for distortion will reduce sharpness a tiny bit, but it's so small that I've never read about anyone obsessing about it. What is much harder to due is to compensate for the lack of sharpness of a lens. There are a ...


6

In a word: no. The 18-200mm will suffice. And a single lens is very convenient. However, there may be advantages (mainly in picture quality) in purchasing some other lenses. But remember more lenses can be cumbersome. What you need really depends on what sort of thing you do. From experience I would offer this advice. Stick with your one zoom for now. ...


5

Some reasons to get lenses with overlapping focal ranges: Larger aperture (allows shorter exposure times in low light conditions, and shallower depth of field) Macro capability (focusing at shorter distance, thus allowing frame-filling shots of small subjects) Better image quality Faster autofocus Smaller size, lower weight


24

You are not required to purchase any lenses at all. It all depends on your photography needs and what you're willing to spend your money on. Regarding range, the superzoom 18-200 mm covers the same range as the other four lenses you mentioned. All of the other lenses focal ranges are parts of the large range of the 18-200 mm lens. The 18-200 can surely ...


1

MC & MD are functionally similar. Will fit on A mount with adaptor - will not infinity focus with no glass. Will infinity focus with extra lens in adaptor so quality is at mercy of adaptor. Manual operation. Probably get "focus peaking" with an eg A77. Will fit on E mount with glassless adaptor (AFAIK).


0

No. The Minolta/Sony Alpha mount is different from the old Minolta manual focus mount so the old manual focus lenses will not fit at all.


1

There aren't wider lenses that are as rectilinear. This is the reason it is as expensive as it is. The price hasn't even really gone up from what it originally cost. Adjusted for inflation, the lens, when new, was around $20,000. It now has additional value as a collectors item, so one in good condition with papers and box and such sells for more than ...


1

Consider getting a quote from Steven Lee, Camera Hospital, Beencoolen street, Singapore - Camera hospital website here I have personally sent cameras and lenses from NZ for Steven to repair, so this option is possibly a viable one for you. He's good, honest, friendly (although sometimes little spoken) and about as cheap as you'll get. Slow freight both ...


3

Unless you can do it yourself there are no cheap lens repairs. It takes the same amount of time and expertise to disassemble, repair, and reassemble a cheap lens as it does to do so with an expensive one. With regards to repairing an existing lens, the only difference is the quality of the glass and other parts that the lens is made of. If replacement parts ...


3

In general, all camera brands have their own proprietary system for connecting lenses. Modern mounts are all bayonet style, which means they twist and lock rather than needing to screw on, as older lenses did. These mounts are not interchangeable, so you'll need a lens that matches your camera bodies. Most brands have different sub-variants of their mount, ...


3

The lens you've linked to is the Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 II. It will not fit your camera, because it is a Canon EOS lens: neither the physical linkage nor the electronic contacts match those on your camera. What you're looking for is a Nikon F-mount lens. The easiest way to ensure you've got an F-mount lens is to buy a new lens that's Nikon-branded that is for ...


5

Your logic is sound. If your assumptions were right, then your conclusion would be right. Let me turn one of your questions around. You ask: Why does crop factor apply with APS-C-lenses, while it sounds like the image circle is compressed onto the APS-C-sensor (thus making a wider FOV)? In fact, the image circle isn't compressed, and does not make a ...


1

In general, you want to look at the lens mount. Cameras and lenses both use some standard of connector to ensure compatibility. In general, if a lens uses the same mount, it should be basically compatible, though some features may not work. For example, third party lenses may not support automatic adjustments on newer cameras without updates. Similarly, ...


1

The image circle produced by a lens is independent of the focal length. It is the combination of the focal length and the sensor size that determine the effective FOV. For example, a 90mm lens designed for a view camera with film that is 4x5 inches in size will have a wide angle FOV on that camera. But take that same lens and mount it on a DSLR with an APS-C ...


1

You are misunderstanding a few things that are causing you confusion. The only difference between a lens designed for a full frame sensor and a lens designed for an APS-c sensor is that the APS-c lens collects less light since it is producing a smaller image circle. The light per surface area of the image circle is the same, but the circle is smaller. An ...


0

Given that most of those covers are designed for Canon L lenses, which are high visibility white normally, they would have an effect in making your lens less visible when it pokes out from a hide... But that's not because of the camo pattern, it's because it's now darker than it used to be... For a Nikon lens (which are all black) there should never be a ...


5

Movement, scent, noise and shape are more likely to effect an animal's behaviour than the pattern of the camouflage used on a lens. However the pattern may help in that it breaks up the shape of the outline of the lens, which is alien to the animal's habitat and will most likely be seen a trap. As many animals are colour blind, the colour may not effect ...


1

I think animals are more likely to notice the lens glass as that's what is pointed in their direction. It's hard to say that they'd notice the side of something not facing them. Also consider that they're more likely to notice you before they notice the relatively small lens. However, I wouldn't knock the product as being completely useless. Yes, there are ...


0

As others have wrote - it is difficult to make lenses that can focus at very different distances. Designer of the lenses have to choose possible distances because it may affect size, weight, complexity and finally cost of the lenses. In fact there are also lenses than can focus at very close distances but CAN'T at far distances. The example is this: Canon ...


1

First we should explain what a 'stop' (or more correctly, an 'f-stop', the ratio of the lens's focal length to the diameter of the entrance pupil.) is: it means a doubling or halving of the light gathered during an exposure by opening or closing your aperture. But more generally, the same exposure effect (purely in terms of the amount of light, ignoring ...


3

I don't know anyone who calculate those kind of thing, people just pull numbers out of their .. hemm .. I mean people produce approximate numbers based on their rich experience. If you did want to calculate this the method would be: Test what is the slowest shutter speed that give you sharp hand-held images with IS turned off Test what is the slowest ...


0

The "vibration reduction", "image stabilization", "optical stabilization" or whatever the manufacturer calls it is a function that uses small optical elements to counter the small erratic movements that the photographer introduces when handholding the camera. When handholding a camera without this stabilizing function a rule of thumb is to not use a shutter ...


1

This is most easily achieved by using the change of density between air and water and a domed enclosure. When light passes from water to air through a piece of glass or plastic, it is bent by the transition. This effect can be used to form a lens that only applies when submerged. When above water, the air-air interface allows light to pass through ...


3

You can make lenses that are designed for a glass air interface too. Most famous of these is probably that of the Nikonos: Many Nikonos lenses, the "UW" series, were specifically designed for underwater photography only. It is said that, even to this day, no underwater lens matches the Nikonos "UW" lenses for sharpness and color saturation underwater. A ...


-4

The Camera Lenses does not know focus, it is just gears you can turn. Therefore air has nothing to do with focus. The camera uses a complex algorithm to determine when a picture is in focus or oof. And it will turn the gears via internal focus motor, or in lens motor to adjust focus. I think this may answer you question how camera determine focus: ...


0

This is kind of a hard head-to-head comparison, but basically, the EF-S 17-85 was an upgrade over the contemporaneous 18-55 kit lenses of its day (2004)--the non-USM, non-IS first version. The IS STM version of the 18-55 kit lens, however, is something like the eighth version of that lens, introduced in 2013, so it's a spanking new design, and probably ...


1

On telephoto (and retrofocus, and zoom) lens design: The simple definition of a telephoto lens is a lens that has a focal length longer than the physical lens. Many lenses that are 'long' (as opposed to 'normal' or 'wide') are telephoto in design. This is because it sometimes is impractical to put that much of a barrel on the lens. In the SLR world, one ...


0

Telephoto and zoom are two completely different things. Zoom simply means that the focal length (apparent magnification) of the lens can be changed, ie, it looks like it can look at things either closer up or further away by adjusting it. Telephoto, roughly, means that the lens has a relatively narrow field of view, thus it can be used to look at things ...


0

For landscapes, you probably don't want a telephoto. The 18-55 isn't necessarily the best lens out there for what you want to do, but of the three you have listed, it is the only one that is not a lens going from telephoto all the way in to super telephoto territory and thus probably the only one of the 3 that would really be ideal for landscape. It is the ...


-1

I think fixed aperture in zoom lens is nice when I shoot pictures of a blank wall. As I zoom in zoom out, the light on the blank wall does not change so there's no need to change aperture.


1

Even if you could you probably wouldn't want to. The tolerance for the mount flange and the the sensor being out of alignment before you start having fairly significant problems with uniform focus across the frame is measured in micrometers. If your camera was subjected to enough force to bend the metal ring, then the engineering grade plastic to which the ...


0

Just skimming results from Google, both seem like good lenses. However, the big issue is that you have a crop sensor camera, so the 28 would be a widish normal lens and the 24 would be like a 35mm on full frame- a mild wide angle. A 20mm would be a better wide angle on your camera.


1

Well, there is a .45X adapter available under a number of brand names (including the original Kodak accessory in the used market) that will take it from a 38-380mm equivalent to a 17-170mm equivalent for about $50-60 new, or less used. The optics are "good enough"; the camera is a 2004-vintage 5MP machine with a 1/2.7" sensor, so you can't expect miracles. ...


2

No. No lens adapter or add-ons can turn a a fixed-lens, small-sensored (1/2.5" format) camera into one with an interchangeable lens mount and large (APS-C) sensor. However, the DX7590 can use a filter adapter tube so you can put a 52mm-diameter filter in front of the camera's lens. The type of filter you choose can extend function. You can get ...


0

Canon totally changed their lens mount once when they introduced the EF and EOS system. They may do something alike again. Canon did change the system about 15 years ago in a way that compatible Sigma lenses have not been compatible any more to any of the newly (from that date) release bodies. That may happen again. (This particular issue may come down ...


4

There are no guarantees that any particular manufacturer will continue to produce lenses in any particular mount. They may choose to change their entire system. They may go out of business and produce nothing. Having said that, you are probably safer with the Canon EF mount than any other mount currently on the market. This is true for several reasons. ...


0

You don't have to worry. The probability that Canon would change to a different mount that wouldn't take the current EF lenses is extremely remote. Even if they did that, pretty much every lens that you could want would be on Ebay. I have a Canon, and I'm not worried at all.


1

All Canon DSLRs currently support the EF lens system and any APS-c cameras support the EF-s lens system. If there is a lens that you want with that mount, it will work on your camera (though some features of the lens may or may not be supported in some rare cases.) There is no guarantee that Canon won't stop making EF lenses tomorrow and switch to a ...


0

I've recently undertaken a similar project and found that the Nikon ES-1 slide copying attachment is a great piece of equipment. It screws on to the front of a lens and holds a slide parallel to the sensor/film plane, and also provides a diffuser to help adequately light the slide. I'm using a D800 (full frame) and 60mm AF-S G lens and mounting the ES-1 to ...


2

The 'D' series lenses have an aperture ring that you can adjust on the lens. This is different than the 'G' series which do not have that and are completely electronically controlled. On mechanical cameras, the f/stop is set from the lens itself. You adjust the f/stop on the lens, and then when you shoot the photo, the body closes the aperture to the ...



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