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71

Rockwell is a moron (or more accurately he presents his opinion as fact even when it is actually a contested opinion). Yes, professionals use 24-70 lenses. They aren't for every situation, but there are plenty where they are great go to lenses. The Canon 24-70 f/2.8 II, for example, is one of the most popular zoom lenses ever. I do wedding photography ...


18

The focal length/speed is only one factor in the retail price of the lens. Other goodies like construction (metal vs. plastic), image stabilization (and other automation in general) and vintage can easily add (or remove) a zero. The two lenses in the question are very different products. The 2.8G is a newer product and lacks an aperture ring - the diaphragm ...


9

You're right that the angle of view of the iPhone camera is a little bit wider than a 35mm lens on a full-frame film camera. Up until this point, you're not really confused. But the part after that, about the small room and zoom and distance — definitely confused. :) "Zoom" means the ability to change the field of view — it isn't magnification. See What is ...


7

This looks very much like motion blur, caused by the camera being moved during the exposure. I seriously doubt the shutter speed was really 1/800 s. Is that just what you thought you set it to, or is it what the EXIF data says? If the latter, there is probably something wrong with your camera. Note that the blurring is more a horizontal smear than ...


7

They are flash guide numbers (in meters, for ISO 100). This is for the QL17, but see Cameraquest, and check out the manual here (page 17). Apparently many rangefinder (and point and shoot) cameras of the day used the "Flashmatic" system, where the camera automatically selects an aperture to match your focus distance and flash power. So, set the ring to the ...


6

There is no approximate durability. It depends on many factors. If durability is important to you, beyond proper care I would recommend a Canon L series lens that is weather sealed and likely is made of longer lasting materials. See this for much more information: What makes a camera 'weather sealed'? Also: What is the difference between Canon ...


6

This is the typical tradeoff between a zoom lens and a prime. The zoom gives you more flexibility, and is appropriate for both landscapes and portraits, with the whole range in between. The prime gives you a lot of quality for a small price, more light and shallower depth of field for the same focal length (and for some longer ones), it's lighter and ...


6

Which professionals? Different photographers obviously have different needs. As a rule, be suspect of any statement that treats the needs of such a large class of people the same. The Canon EF 24-70 f/4L is a very popular lens, but at $1000, it's not exactly targeted at consumers.


6

That lens has a switch that limits focus from 5m to infinity. The other setting (full) lets you focus from 1.4 m to infinity. There is no setting to focus between 1.4m and 5m only. You cannot focus on anything closer than 1.4 meter with that lens. Manual here: http://cdn-10.nikon-cdn.com/pdf/manuals/lenses/AF/AFS70-200_2.8GEDVRII.pdf I use the 5m - ...


5

AFAIK the 28-70 isn't being produced anymore since 2008-ish? So if you are buying a new one today chances are it's been in somebody's warehouse for at least 6 years burning a hole in their pocket. The new version also allegedly boasts a better nano-coating on the front element. Not sure what else might be making up for the price difference.


5

The AF-S 28-70/2.8D f/2.8 has been out of production since 2007. It's an older version of the lens that's more or less be replaced by the newer 24-70. Nearly every lens that's been superseded tends to cost less than newer replacement models, especially if found used (when it was brand new in 2002, the 28-70/2.8 cost $1400, which if you cost adjust, comes in ...


5

@AJ said all that I would have said and more about kenrockwell.com; but I would like to expand more on your specific requirement (and on AJ's recommendation) as this is also the kind of photography that I do the most. For your situation of shooting mostly buildings where you can set the shot up, you are probably best served by following his advice ...


5

At full resolution, the line gets terrible. Perhaps I've missed something, but it sounds like you want to make the line between the light and dark parts of the wall as sharp as possible, more like the lights on the right hand side of this image than the ones on the left: In that case, as long as your camera is properly focussed in the first place, ...


4

I'm going to disagree with Jasmine here: this is the wrong lens for your camera. The 18-140 is a perfectly good beginner lens - but you haven't bought a beginner's camera, you've bought something designed for more experienced users. By using a lens designed for the lower end of Nikon's range (a "DX" lens like the 18-140), you are literally throwing away ...


4

This is entirely too variable to give a meaningful answer to. Higher quality lenses will last longer under the same usage criteria. But an abused high quality lens won't last as long as a well cared for cheap lens. (Although I suppose some might argue that many cheap lenses effectively come broken from the factory.) Additionally, lenses don't just become ...


3

This is obviously a motion blur of some sort. Unfortunately, there's nothing in the exif for the image shown. I'm going to concentrate on one small spot here to give my theory, note that it may not tell the full story. The thing we are seeing here is two overlapping images. From the Nikon site for the 5300 features: Two images taken with one ...


3

Well, it might sometimes be f/1.6, f/2.5, or other sizes (depending on the lens construction and on the exact f-stop used). Actually, f/1.8 fits in this "unusual" group. You might have noticed the canonical series goes by powers of √2. {1 ; 1.4 ; 2 ; 2.8 ; 4 ; 5.6 ; 8 ; 11 ; 16 ; 22 ; 32 ...} It's just easier to remember. What we're all calling ...


3

Have you considered the new EF-S 10-18mm f/4-5.6 STM ultrawide zoom for crop? Its MSRP is US$299, so it's about half the price of the EF-S 10-22. Sorry, but due to the crop factor, you're not going to find an ultrawide for full frame that also performs as an ultrawide for crop, and definitely not one for $500 or less. To me, this would be a far better ...


3

The "thingy" you can turn on the lens is a focus dial. Most modern lenses don't have a separate manual aperture control, instead relying on the body for automatic aperture setting. And even if the lens supported manual aperture control, except for on very, very old lenses, the aperture diaphram stays open until you press the shutter, at which point it is ...


3

For cityscapes and general urban subjects, your 35mm prime is bound to be very good. When I do that sort of thing, I usually carry too much stuff with me: 12-24mm f2.8, 24-75mm f2.8, 36-300mm f/4, tripod, remote/timer, cleaning kit, batteries/cards/etc. Either all that or a compact cam and tiny tripod. You may want to consider keeping your prime attached, ...


2

The sports teams and venues set the rules for photography. Some events don't allow any photography at all. Best to check before you go, otherwise you will have to leave your camera in the car in the parking lot, setting you up for theft. Generally in the USA anyway, professional Baseball allows photography, Football and Basketball do not. As for how that ...


2

Nobody can know that better than you. If you feel you need to go wider, get the 14mm lens, but keep in mind two things: It is never wide enough (I have a 12-24mm and I wished I could go down to 10mm. I am sure that if I had a 10mm I would wish I could go to 8mm...) The wider the lens, the more difficult it is to make nice compositions. Personally, I ...


2

The hole stays wide open to let in the maximum amount of light when you're composing and focussing. The hole closes down to the specified aperture value at the moment the shot is being taken. That's a feature, not a bug.


2

With wildlife, 300mm is considered the minimum focal length you want (if we're really talking wildlife out in the wild, and not backyard semi-tame beasties that aren't shy of humans). 400mm is typically considered a minimum for birds. So, it does in some respects depend on what wildlife you're most typically stalking, in terms of how large and how shy they ...


2

The general rule of focal length for animals is that too much is never enough. It basically comes down to how much you can afford and are willing to carry. Many nature shots will be in remote places, so lugging the equipment there is a serious consideration. That all said, I'd at least want to go out with a 300 mm lens (relative to a full frame sensor). ...


2

I would say you certainly don't need TWO 70-300mm lenses. I The 55-200 is half the weight of the 70-300, so might be worth keeping (and the 55-70 range would be useful too - but if you only had 18-55 and 70-300, the "gap" is nothing to really worry about) The Sigma 70-300 isn't a true (1:1) macro, but if you're happy with it as a macro lens then keep it, ...


2

You have three telephoto zoom lenses, which to me looks like two too many. But I think that it depends on you, and you should know which of the three you don't need.


2

Annie Leibovitz used a Canon 24-70 2.8L for her photoshoot of the Queen Elizabeth of England. So the statement that professionals don't use that lens isn't true. I have shot professionally for 6 years and my 2 go to lenses are the Canon 24-70 2.8L and Canon 70-200 2.8L IS depending on the circumstances.


2

Put your camera on a tripod, focus manually on the wall, and set aperture (probably a higher number, like f/11 to get deep DoF) and time manually, too. This way, you'll get consistent results over multiple shots.


2

It looks like you were using a flash and a high speed shutter because it appears you caught the shutter in motion (thus the large black wall). To get a well focused shot, if possible, pre-focus with the light on. Focus has a hard time operating in the dark, so providing extra light is the easiest way to allow it to focus and then remove the light before ...



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