Lightnings taking a ride

by ceinmart

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5

That is intentional. As described here: This new STM lens is an inch shorter and adds a zoom lock and instant manual-focus override to the older 18-135mm EF-S IS lens, however manual focus is electronic. The focus ring isn't connected to anything, and there is a tiny time delay between when you move the ring and the lens moving. The speed at which the ...


5

Yes, and that is the maybe the major advantage of high-resoluton sensors, for typical print sizes. You can crop the image and still get an image with reasonable detail. That said, the actual resolution of the image depends on the quality of the lens, too. Only quite high-end lenses will actually make good use of a 24MP sensor. if you look at a lens ...


4

I fixed this in the sources of Lensfun. It will be part of the next release. Until then, you can edit the file mil-panasonic.xml, probably in /usr/share/lensfun. Search for "12-32" in that file, and expand the lens model name to "Lumix G Vario 12-32mm F3.5-5.6 Asph. Mega OIS".


4

There is a HUGE difference. The 17-40 is good for northern lights, moon-illuminated landscape and such where but it will struggle a bit with noise in other "darker" situations. The Samyang 24mm is very, very fast and quite sharp even wide open if you get a good copy...(BUT NOT VERY WIDE, which is why many night photog specialists usually also have an ...


4

It seems likely that there is a hair, eyelash, or other small artifact on the sensor. Something on the lens is unlikely to show up like this (it'd be too out of focus). You may be able to simply blow it off — don't use your mouth, and definitely don't use compressed air, but a quality "rocket blower" (with an intake filter) should do it. Put your camera into ...


4

The Canon 18-135mm STM lens allows for Manual override when set to AF Mode. It will not harm the lens or the camera. It is a feature that is commonly used by Videographers but also by some photographers, A common example will be at a wedding. Here you focus on the bride, you hear the beep and see the red dot. Now with the shutter half pressed, you pan over ...


3

Basically you can divide lenses (or just about anything really) into 3 categories: Lenses that are really good for one thing and one thing only (or a small set of things) Lenses that are not great at anything but are ok for a lot of things Lenses that cost a fortune (and still can't do everything) Now, since you are a newbie I assume option 3 is out of ...


3

Provided you have more than average skills with fine mechanics, it can be done. The lens focusing mechanism has a couple of guide rails, which are probably loose and must be reattached in order to have it working normally again. When the second of them came loose, focusing became hard, as the focusing rail probably would twist and not be aligned when ...


2

...I just answered my question about the macro/ wide angle lens - you just screw it on to the end of the zoom lens :)


2

All Canon EF (not EF-S) lenses will work with the camera. What kind of experience you are looking for? It is a fine camera. Current 5D series models have faster autofocus, less noise and higher resolution than the original 5D.


2

I think the question is mainly about performance of various lenses. Set at 18mm your 18-105 will shoot the same field of view as the 18-55 set at 18mm. However that does not mean the pictures will come out the same. Generally speaking the 18-55 is a sharp lens across the range it servers (I dont own an 18-105 so I cant really comment). A lot of people really ...


2

Absolutely, there is a drop in quality as the zoom-ratio increases. This is normal because the designers have to made compromises when placing lens elements. This gives a performance which is uneven too. Many times you can have decent sharpness at one end of the zoom and it will truly terrible at the other end or somewhere in the middle. The other thing is ...


1

A mark this noticeable would have to be on either the rear element, or more likely, the sensor, as was said in another answer. Dust is most harmful to image quality at locations within the optical system where the image is "created" and projected; the rear element of the lens and the sensor respectively. Light is more tightly converged at these locations, ...


1

The only decrease in quality will be the likely performance difference between the Full Frame and APS-C sensor. In general FF lenses used on APS-C cameras perform slightly better than when used on FF cameras because the edges of the light circle cast by the lens, where most of the weaknesses of a lens are most obvious, are cropped off by the smaller sensor. ...


1

Between those three you have listed, I would go with 50mm one. If I wanted to pick one myself, prime, non-zoom...I would pick 35mm. It is better for street photography. If I wanted to pick one, zoom and affordable range I would go with 24-85mm if Canon has it, for a higher price 24-70 f2.8 is a good walk around lens.


1

Although, buying a first lens can be considered a subjective decision, you can make this decision easier by deciding on how far you wish to take your photography. Are you buying a DSLR and Lens to improve your skills in composition along with the quality of your photos or are you looking for a camera with a lens that provides the versatility of not just ...


1

It will give you some cropping room - if you use the same lens and a couple of steps back. If you're already stood against the back wall of your studio then more pixels won't help you. 12-24Mp also isn't as big a jump as you might first think. If you're using the extra pixels as a lever to get someone to break out their wallet then you might have to try ...


1

If you are going to make mostly portraits, a 50mm prime would fit you much better. Not only gives you a lower aperture, but the image quality is better with primes. Don't worry about the "ideal" 70-90mm range, 50mm is a classic focal length for portraits.


1

I have also experienced that changing the lens is cumbersome and sometimes you tend to miss certain events while you are anxiously changing lenses That's something that you can improve by training it. A good large bag can also help, because it allows you to carry the lenses without caps1. This makes changing lenses less cumbersome: take old lens off ...


1

F/1.4 vs, f/4 is three full stops. That means the f/1.4 lens allows eight times the amount of light through the lens than the f/4 lens does! This means you can shoot at lower ISO or for shorter shutter times or both. It means at the same ISO and shutter times, with the f/1.4 lens you can capture night sky objects 1/8 the brightness of what you can capture ...


1

From the pictures and your description it seems that the lens (the spherical part in the middle) is missing. Taking photos without the lens will not give you any sharp pictures, all you will see is some very blurry colours. As Polaroid film is rather expensive I would not waste it to this partial camera, but would look for a fully functioning one.


1

You can try an adapter like this however it has an element in it so you will be at the mercy of the quality of that element. Or you could opt for one with no element like this however because of the big distance from element to sensor that nikon has you will most likely lose infinite focus (thats what the element corrects. WARNING: various makers used ...


1

I would say that focal length is the most important thing to look at. Somewhere around 35mm-equivalent (so, 23mm or so on APS-C). That's the field of view of most phone cameras these days — because this kind of situation is definitely one they need to cover. Similarly, kit lenses tend to be zooms covering this range, for the same basic reason (although see ...


1

The short of it is that the you will want to look for the same attributes regardless of if the lens is for indoor or outdoor use. One could argue that the following short list is of special consideration: Focal length (you may hit walls and distortion is a big concern) Weather sealing (not as important if you never go outside) Weight constraints (not as ...


1

Without more information, generally, you want to find lenses that are the widest aperture you can get within your budget and matches the focal length you desire. The wider the aperture (lower F#), the more light. Also, shooting at longer focal lengths in low light situations will likely require a tripod or lens with image stabilization.


1

For an f/2.8 lens, it is not really necessary. f/2.8 is a fast lens and you can use higher shutter speeds. For an f/4 lens, it might be useful in some situations. An f/4 lens is a medium speed lens and can require shutter speeds slower than desired. This is why Canon has IS on their f/4 lenses and not on their f/2.8 lenses ("L" Series).


1

I know this is an old question, but I found it while searching for the same answer. My homeowners or renters insurance won't cover rented equipment. Neither will the benefits on any of my credit cards. So far, my options are to go uninsured, which requires me to provide a credit card that up to the entire value of the rented equipment can be charged to ...



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