I Dare You!

by peter_budo

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14

So, there a couple of basics to get out of the way first. Pentax DSLRs are just fine compared to Canon and Nikon; they're solidly built, have a decent but smaller following, and in fact often have better features at the same price level (because they need to, to compete). That's not to say blindly that "Pentax Is The Best!"; in fact, they're all great and ...


9

Your edit adds some clarification: you have trouble shooting indoors. Typically when shooting indoors and fighting tight spots means you need a wider lens. If the 18-55 isn't wide enough, then the 18-140 is going to be no different -- they are both 18 mm at the wide end. In other words, the 18-140 won't help that situation; the 16-85 is a bit wider, so that ...


8

That looks like fungus. Here's some information from the Zeiss website regarding fungus. If it is fungus you may be able to halt its progress with an ultraviolet light source (removing the lens and placing it in strong sunlight is one thing to try). If it's not affecting your images too badly then live with it as fungus can permanently and irreparably damage ...


7

I think that you are underestimating how bad a bad lens truly is. It is going to be very obvious if you pickup a real dud and it is acting like a $500 vs $1,600 lens. You can and should run though the related question and its recommendations for testing any new lens: How can I test a new lens to make sure it is operating correctly?. You state that you ...


7

I started out much the same way, choosing Pentax DSLR because I already had Pentax lenses. While I'm still with Pentax (now on my 3rd: ist-D; K-10D and now K-5), to be honest I barely ever used my original lenses. Absolutely no offense intended but your existing lenses don't look anything particularly special, just as mine weren't - they look perfectly ...


7

I'm going to take a wildass blind guess, but doing an image search on Google which led to WrongRob's Instagram and then his website, it looks like he shoots with a Leica M, which has a full frame sensor in it. So my guess would be that the thin depth of field may have been created with a Noctilux 50mm f/0.95 lens. Whatever apertures he's using, if he's ...


6

When looking for a wide angle lens you should consider a few very important things: Focal length Image Quality Maximum Aperture Focus modes (AF/MF) Filter compatibility Feature set (FTM, IS, USM, etc.) Mount Weight, size, cost, etc. Intended usage Distortion & Projection Flare resistance Most of the above is not uniquely important to wide angle ...


5

I think the problem here is that you assume focal length is all (or the most important factor) you need to look at when choosing a new lens. It isn't. Your other problem is assuming that a lens is going to solve your problems. It may not. All things being equal, getting a walkaround superzoom when you already have a "twin kit" of a wide-to-normal/short ...


5

I'm far from an expert on Pentax legacy lenses but the kit you have doesn't appear to be anything I would let drive future purchases. In other words, unless you have a strong personal tie to the equipment or are working with a very limited future budget, I would recommend not adding in those lenses to the equation. As for the statement "Pentax DSLRs aren't ...


5

I'm aware that actual focal length of a lens on APS-C cameras is longer than what is written on the lens. Sorry to say this, but whoever told you that was wrong. The actual focal length of a lens on an APS-C camera is exactly1 what is written on the lens. What you're probably confused about is the fact that the field of view you get from mounting a 50mm ...


4

The lens used would have a reasonably large aperture (low F number). This gives the effect of a relatively narrow depth of field and also allows more light to get to the sensor, making it easier to capture a correctly exposed image. The focal length used would be in the 'normal' range (somewhere around 50mm for Full Frame, or 30mm on APS-C), as opposed to ...


4

Consider Sony A-mount Your Tamron lens is Minolta AF mount. This is, in fact, the same lens mount that Sony's A-mount SLT cameras use, so if it's absolutely imperative that you use this lens, Sony's A-mount cameras would not require an adapter and would give the highest level of compatibility (including autofocus). However, to most of us, a third-party ...


4

It will work. Any EF lens will mount on any EOS camera - as long as it's not EF-S or EF-M (which the 50mm f/1.8 isn't). In addition, MP-E and TS-E lenses will also mount and work on any EOS camera.


3

Both Canon 1.4x and 2x extenders work - more information here (search within the page for extender). Additionally, fitting this on a 1.6x crop-sensor body will give an equivalent of 38.4mm focal length. This route would avoid the incorrect aperture reporting issues, and potentially offer better image quality than when using an extender - if you happen to ...


3

I have had this happen twice on my D800. To release the lens is simple. There is a service port, or cut-out, that is visible in front of the lens release. A thin bladed screw driver inserted into this port, with the lens or body turning at the same time will separate the two. If nothing else, you now only have to send the body into Nikon. I feel the pin in ...


3

The kind of lenses you need depend a lot on what and how you like to shoot, and how limited you are by your budget. Basic features, like focal length, maximum aperture, and stabilization will be determined by your usage. See this basic guide to lenses for explanations of lens features and what they mean in practical terms. You may also want to see Lens ...


3

Another option that would work for some purposes (i.e. a single still image) is to stitch multiple pictures together. Since you mention a GoPro, I'm guessing this might not be what you have in mind, but it's one possible solution to the question as stated, so it should probably be included...


2

Canon now makes two pancake lenses for the EOS mount. Both are just slightly wider than "normal", f/2.8, metal builds, and come with the STM focus motor. Both have reviewed quite well for sharpness and overall image quality; see the-digital-picture.com reviews for the 40/2.8 and the 24/2.8. The EF 40mm f/2.8 STM is for full-frame cameras. The EF-S 24mm ...


2

It is the lens that takes the picture, not the camera body. All that the body does is open and close the shutter to let in the light from the lens. You can have the best and most expensive camera body in the world, if you put a cheap lens on it the result will be a poor picture quality. Conversely, if you put a high quality lens on a cheap camera body, as ...


2

There are a number of fast X-Ray lenses out there. Rayxr De Oude Delft 50mm f/0.75, Rodenstock XR-Heligon 50mm f/0.75, Precise Optics 50mm f/0.75, Varo Optical 50mm f/0.75, Leitz 65mm f./0.75. There are also a number of longer f/0.95 – f/1 lenses in the 90mm range from the same lens manufacturers. There's a company Miyazaki R&D (well, it's just one man ...


2

Short of using professional lab tools you can't really determine if a single lens is performing up to spec or not. If you have real stinker you can usually tell that, but without a calibrated optical bench it is nigh impossible to tell if a lens is slightly better or slightly worse than the manufacturers stated performance. In the real world what usually ...


2

That is a Canon FD mount lens. While you could find an adapter to mount it on a D3200, it's problematic, even for adapting onto a Canon dSLR. The main problem here is the registration distance. This is the distance that the lens is held by the mount away from the image plane (the sensor, in the case of a dSLR). This distance varies between mount systems, ...


2

No, it works the other way around. The main measure to know is the flange distance. This is the distance between the mount and sensor on a camera. Lenses for a particular mount are designed for exactly that distance. If a lens would be mounted with the wrong flange distance it would not be able to achieve focus for more than a very short distance, usually a ...


2

At the moment, this question reads to me like a case of Gear Acquisition Syndrome: the first thing to do is to work out why you want a new lens, and then pick a lens which lets you do that. Buying a lens for the sake of buying a lens has a high risk of just throwing money away. I'd suggest sitting down, working out how your current equipment is holding you ...


2

It probably uses the electrical contacts in post-AI bodies to tell the camera the maximum aperture of the lens so the camera can calculate correct exposure. light levels are measured with the lens at max aperture, the camera needs to know what that is so it can work out how many stops to reduce aperture. Or to set speed in aperture-priority mode. The ...


2

The advertised focal length is the actual focal length of the lens and not the Full frame equivalent focal length. The focal lengths are reported like this as the focal length of a lens is a physical property of the lens that is not changed by the size of the surface onto which it projects an image.


2

Use an F-Mount AF-S or AF-I lens to get the most from your camera. The AF-I is the older version of the current AF-S. This means the lens has an internal auto-focus motor, which the D3200 needs if you want auto-focus. You can use other lenses, but with some kind of limitation depending on the lens. A good place to check if the lens is fully compatible is ...


2

A width of 12 units in a distance of 3 units corresponds to a horizontal angle of view of 127°. For a full-frame digital SLR with a sensor width of 36 mm, the corresponding focal length is 9 mm. You may want to consider using a fisheye lens, which typically offers a 180° diagonal angle of view or even a 180° circular fisheye image.


1

I'm guessing from your mention of the 18-140mm that you're using Nikon gear. The 16-85mm should make an excellent "everyday" lens that covers many situations, and offer a useful upgrade from the 18-55mm kit lens. It should be wide enough for indoor work, landscapes etc., and long enough so you won't be wanting to fit your 55-300 every time you need a ...


1

Canon teleconverters won't fit because they have a protruding front element that needs a corresponding recess in the host lens, which only the Canon L-series teles have, but third-party ones from Tamron and others should fit. Not Sigmas, they have similar design to the Canons. Optical quality is another matter, it is usually desireable to stop down a bit to ...



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