Alley in Pisa, Italy

by Lars Kotthoff

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12

The basic answer is that Canon's 50mm f/1.8 is an exception even within Canon's lineup. It's an old, simple design with nothing fancy, and made to be mass-produced cheaply. Compare the Canon 85mm f/1.8, at AU$360. Basically, almost no lenses are as cheap as the one you're using as your reference point, so your perception is skewed. The Olympus lenses aren't ...


8

Third party lenses are generally safe to use. The only situation that is likely to damage the camera is if the lens focuses light weirdly and so creates a part of the camera a lot hotter than usually or overloads the sensor. This is very unlikely. Third party lenses (especially from manufacturers such as Tamron, Tonkina and Sigma) are usually of equal (and ...


7

Camera and lens designs are full of compromises and certain decisions have knock on effect throughout the system. Olympus decided on a particularly thick filter stack when specifying the micro four thirds system. This and the short backfocus distance of a mirrorless lens mount necessitate a telecentric or near telecentric lens design where rays exit the ...


6

I'm not sure what you are hoping for. The shutter is not in the lens, but rather in the camera. A lens can't increase the maximum shutter speed of the camera itself unless it had it's own independent shutter. I'm not aware of any such lenses. Speed Boosting adapters are not used to increase the maximum shutter speed of the camera, but rather to focus ...


5

The FX lenses work fine, so I wonder if there is any point buying a DX Lens? Yes there are several points. Because the image circle for a DX is smaller there exist DX lenses which doesn't have counterparts in FX lineup. Just two examples: the famous Sigma 18-35mm f/1.8 DC HSM (no Full Frame zoom with f/1.8 exist) the new super-super-zoom Tamron ...


4

You need a much longer focal length than 55mm to do this with a camera lens. The sun only occupies about a 1/2° arc of sky, yet at 55mm your lens is collecting light from about a 70° arc - the sun is occupying well less than 1% of your lens' field of view! And the entrance pupil (effective aperture) at 55mm and f/2.8 is only about 20mm. A cheap magnifying ...


4

I guess you are confused with term "faster lens". It basically a high quality glass with very small f number say f/1.2. The use of this kinda aperture is in low light conditions. When you can bring down the f number to gather more light, it helps you choose a faster shutter speed, you can pick a shutter speed you camera is designed for in your case no matter ...


3

Ultrasonic motor (USM) in this case should not be associated with human being audible frequency. I do not think the lens manufacturer builts it for the reason of no noise during operation, but the advanced simpler control of the lens movement by using the sinusoidal electric wave at the ultrasonic range frequency. Ultrasonic motor is low speed and high ...


3

The "telecompressor" you mentioned is a focal reducer, a device that concentrates the image in order to project it onto a smaller sensor. This approach reduces the backfocus distance (the distance from the back of the lens to the sensor). So it only works on mirrorless cameras using lenses designed for DSLRs (which have sufficient backfocus distance to make ...


3

You're mixing up some terminology here, so starting with vocabulary, a "wide angle lens" is one that can go wide and give a you a very large field of view--a lens that takes in the scene. What "25mm wide angle" means is that when you're zoomed all the way out, the field of view you have is equivalent to what a 25mm lens would see on a 35mm film camera. ...


3

"R" stands for Ring and means the lens is equipped with an aperture ring. From Fijifilm's FAQ: http://faq.fujifilm.com/digitalcamera/faq_detail.html?id=110201428&pnum=1833


3

I assume by not being able to adjust the lens properly you probably mean focusing. In case your cameras auto-focus is not able to focus correctly in the dark your best bet would be to flick to manual focus and by trial error get the right focus. A good way to easily get the correct manual focus is by using live view (this can be tricky in dark as you might ...


3

I don't think you need full frame. I would use a medium telephoto lens (80-150mm) to get some distance from the subject. On a tripod, lens stopped down, you shouldn't need focus stacking I don't think they've used a light tent. If you look carefully at the top photo there are two shadows of the heels at 45 degree angles. So I imagine they've used to ...


3

Lens 2. Its a pseudo macro lens. 1/2 magnification. (true macro is 1/1). And the focal length of it is typical for macro work. (90-105mm FF eq.). The 28mm even with macro extender wouldnt give much of a macro creamy bokeh look.


3

Those two photos are heavily processed - you can't get that all in one image with one exposure. I'm not saying it's impossible, just extremely unlikely, from looking at the images. In fact, in the top one, she didn't do the reflection correctly, and the reflection doesn't match what it's reflecting - it's not obvious but there's some large errors in the ...


2

I have owned the first 16-35 f2,8, the successor 16-35 f2.8 II and the 17-40 f4, and now the 16-35 f4. The new lens is much better in the corners and is really sharp overall. I sold the earlier wide angle zooms and even a 14mm f2.8 prime because the edges were unusable even stopped down. I had to crop frequently to eliminate the smeared parts. I finally ...


2

Nikon G Lenses use a mechanical aperture control, so I would guess that it should be possible modify one to add a aperture ring. Would it be practical? No. Either go for a newer camera or an older lens model.


2

I would say it depends what kind of photo you are taking. If it's the Milky Way with a background/foreground in it, you have to go for a faster lens with a wider focal length like 21mm or below. And that too you are limited to 25 seconds of exposure as the earth rotates and beyond this amount the stars are going to trail. In your case you have to divide 600 ...


2

I assume you mean you want the equivalent focal length as a 70-300mm lens on a DSLR body? If so, the J1 has a crop factor of 2.7x and that means you want something like the Nikkor 30-110mm lens, which they make for the Nikon 1 series. If you mean an actual 70-300mm lens, they also make a Nikon 1 series 70-300mm Or you can buy the FT1 Adapter, which will ...


1

Three years is not old for a lens. Is it possible that it was very cold and accumulated humidity from a warmer environment when you were using it? In that case, just let it rest to get the same temperature, and the humidity will disappear.


1

check out the tokina 11 - 16mm 2.8f http://www.tokinalens.com/tokina/products/atxpro/atx116prodxii/


1

Hard to see what you're asking. A given focal length and composition will always have the same character due to laws of optics. You're always going to see that effect, it has nothing to do with the subject. If you're asking whether some people look good that way, then yes of course they do — but that's your responsibility as the artist to make that happen. ...


1

No, using a third party lens will not damage your sensor in any way. There is a large air gap between the lens and the sensor, so there's no way that using any lens can damage the sensor. (This assumes that you're using a lens for the correct lens mount. If you're using something for a wildly inappropriate lens mount and forcing the lens onto the camera ...


1

General: I assume the problem is focus and not camera shake given the flash should freeze motion pretty well. Without sufficient light and contrast your camera will not autofocus. Most flash units will have a focus assist that draws bright red lines on the subject, allowing for a contrast the camera can focus on. This will only work when your Canon camera ...


1

I guess the most important reason for using subwavelength anti-reflection coating are the problems related with strong curvature of lenses. Multi-layer AR coatings work perfect for flat surfaces and lenses which are not too much bended. For the strong aspheres used for example by Nikon in all new zoom lenses like 14-24 f/2.8 see Nikon Precision Glass Mold ...


1

You'll notice that after 10ft on the focus scale there is an 8 on its side. That's the symbol for infinity, the lens is designed to focus that far, if yours doesn't it may be damaged.


1

When lens are specified in mm, that is the measure of focal-length. It works as you observed, a longer focal-length shows a smaller angle-of-view, assuming the senor or film is the same. You can make a simple experiment to understand why. Find two tubes of different lengths, say the one inside a roll of paper-towel and one inside a toilet-paper. Close one ...


1

Macro lenses will usually stay at a fixed focal length because A) it is difficult to focus with zoom changing B) Zoom lenses can present stability issues when close to a subject There are a few macro lenses that the photographer can "lock" at the minimum focal length.


1

Your second diagram is exactly on point here. Or at least it is for traditional lenses (that is, lenses that are not internal focus). All you need to do is scale the diagram's width according to the focal length of the lens. Longer focal lengths mean that you are focusing closer (at distances less than infinity); that is, the distance between the lens and ...



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