Nidelva river through Trondheim Norway

Nidelva river through Trondheim Norway
by Saaru Lindestokke                

Submit your Photo
Hall of Fame

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Hot answers tagged

95

Rockwell presents his opinion as fact even when it is actually a contested opinion. Yes, professionals use 24-70 lenses. They aren't for every situation, but there are plenty where they are great go to lenses. The Canon 24-70 f/2.8 II, for example, is one of the most popular zoom lenses ever. I do wedding photography and during the reception, the 24-70 ...


14

I am on the edge of investing in the Sony a6000 ... Ok, fallacy #1. :) You never invest in a camera unless you're a pro and can write it off on your taxes. Cameras depreciate. Even while new. Your "investment" will never give you any monetary returns. This is an expense, pure and simple. (If anybody has other suggestions in that price range - I ...


8

For up-close portraiture, I would really look into one or more prime lenses, rather than a zoom lens. Zoom lenses are more complex, optically, and the widest aperture you can usually find for a zoom lens is f/2.8, maybe f/2. The quality you get from a zoom lens will usually be lower than what you can get from a prime, and often for a higher cost. Prime ...


8

First off, select an AF mode other than Zone AF. In my experience, as well as that of many others', it just doesn't work well when shooting action with the 7D. The camera will likely focus on something, but it probably won't be what you wanted to be in focus. Try either Single-point AF or AF point expansion. Set up your camera so that nudging the little ...


7

The Nikkor 24-70mm f2.8 G AF-S ED is a superb piece of kit, and priced accordingly. If your livelihood isn't dependant on getting absolutely optimal quality every time, you could consider a third-party alternative. I use a Sigma 24-70mm f/2.8 Macro lens that's good enough 99% of the time, and costs less than half the price of the Nikon version. You should ...


7

The 200-400 gives you a lot more flexibility. But it might not be short enough depending on what you want to do and how far away you're going to be. When shooting airshows I usually use a 70-200 f/2.8 with 2x teleconverter, and a second camera with a 28-70 f/2.8. For takeoff/landing shots, depending on aircraft and location, even 140mm can be too long ...


7

Two of the lenses I would consider would be either the EF-S 15-85mm f/3.5-5.6 IS or the EF 24-105mm f/4L IS. The 15-85 is lighter and covers a wide range of focal lengths. The 24-105 is built like a tank and covers a range of longer focal lengths. If you intend on taking mostly long range pictures, the EF 70-200mm f/4L IS is the way to go, but it is a ...


7

Here's a little context for comparing the various versions of the Canon 70-200mm "L" lens series: EF 70-200mm f/2.8L was introduced in March 1995. This design is almost 20 years old! EF 70-200mm f/4L was introduced in September 1999. The design is almost 15 years old. EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS was introduced in September 2001, over a decade ago. EF 70-200mm ...


7

If the issues with your current setup are low constrast and looking washed out, then a new lens isn't going to help. A polarizer will help in some cases when there is some blue sky in the picture or a rainbow, but otherwise it won't make much difference either. What will matter is post processing. Clouds are all quite bright, even the "dark" ones. The ...


7

Which professionals? Different photographers obviously have different needs. As a rule, be suspect of any statement that treats the needs of such a large class of people the same. The Canon EF 24-70 f/4L is a very popular lens, but at $1000, it's not exactly targeted at consumers.


7

@mattdm nailed it: I've been shooting long guns for a decade. The single most important factor is light. For a catalog-quality shot you need lots of good diffuse light, which you can get by bouncing a speedlight off a white ceiling or wall, or by shooting in daylight with reflectors. For black guns you need to go between +1 and +2 EV to bring out detail. ...


6

Well a few considerations... You need something very sharp for what you do, so putting extension tubes on a zoom lens isn't going to give you your best results there. Zoom lenses, especially with a fairly wide range like 18-105mm are quite a bit softer than a macro or even a normal prime lens. You want either a normal sharp prime lens and extension tubes ...


6

When is this "eventually" going to happen? If not in the near future (it never is...), than I think you should positively consider the EF-S10-22mm. It is an amazing lens and when time to upgrade comes, you can resell it with a relatively limited loss. Think about bundling it with the Rebel upon sale.


6

Annie Leibovitz used a Canon 24-70 2.8L for her photoshoot of the Queen Elizabeth of England. So the statement that professionals don't use that lens isn't true. I have shot professionally for 6 years and my 2 go to lenses are the Canon 24-70 2.8L and Canon 70-200 2.8L IS depending on the circumstances.


6

Get both. You will definitely need the 18-55mm lens for shooting indoors and general all around photography as it covers wide-angle to short telephoto. The 55-250mm is a great lens for wildlife or sporting events, but it is much too long for shooting indoors.


6

Question asks for opinions, but the answer can be subjective and still be on spot. The first thing to consider when taking photos is your skill, not the camera. And unless it comes to professionals or experts, the kit lens is the first thing that 90% of users will come in contact with (and often the only one); do you really think that Sony couples its ...


6

35mm is not wide enough for many types of general photography. With any group shots, (especially indoors) or any large outdor landscape scenes, you will need something like 16mm to 18mm to get everything in the frame. The easiest way to accomplish this is by going with the 18-55mm kit lens. I don't know what you read but todays kit lenses are much better ...


5

I personally think a flash with bounce and more power offers a lot more flexibility than an additional lens. In many situations you can make up for lack of reach by just moving your body, or fast glass by doing long exposures, but there are just a lot of scenes you can't shoot at all without a diffuse light source (e.g. when fill flash is needed, or an ...


5

The 75-300 III is an older lens with a design that goes back to the '80s. It typically comes in a variety of flavors (with and without USM, with and without IS), but the cheapie one you can find new these days typically sports neither USM nor IS. And the optics are relatively old. That's not to say it's a bad lens, but it's more limited than nearly any ...


5

The EF-S 17-55 f/2.8 isn't an "L" lens -- that's absolutely true. Before dismissing it, though, I think it's important to remember that Canon won't label any EF-S lens an "L" since it wouldn't work on their pro bodies. The performance of the lens, though, is considered to be excellent -- definitely competitive with "L" offerings, and very possibly even ...


5

Taken the crop factor into account, a good and also cheap "normal" lens is the Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 35mm f/1.8G


5

@AJ said all that I would have said and more about kenrockwell.com; but I would like to expand more on your specific requirement (and on AJ's recommendation) as this is also the kind of photography that I do the most. For your situation of shooting mostly buildings where you can set the shot up, you are probably best served by following his advice ...


5

Most professional setups start with a 24-70/2.8 and 70-200/2.8 two-lens combo on full frame and work outwards from there. These are the two general-purpose bread'and'butter lenses for a lot of pros simply because they're versatile being both fast (f/2.8) and zooms in the most common focal length ranges. Whether or not they'll be ideal for you, however, is ...


5

What lens would work for a canon 6D to take up close photos of birds far away in the trees? It comes down to three questions: How up close do you want to get? How far away are the trees? How big are the birds? In landscape orientation, your 400mm lens takes in 3.4 degrees over the height of the sensor and 5.2 degrees across the width. That means ...


5

Don't be fooled by what others say about the kit lens. Sony has a reputation to live up too. The kit lens specifications has been chosen to provide a good entry level lens. Your best choice is to start with the kit lens and then build your inventory of lenses after you learn how to use your new camera.


5

It depends. This is why getting a blanket lens recommendation almost never works. Everybody has a different set of priorities on what and how they want to shoot and how much they have to spend. Getting a 35/1.8 and a telephoto could work really well for you. It also might not. Whether or not you "need" the kit zoom depends. The main thing to keep in mind ...


4

There are many questions there but I realize you may be too confused to disentangle them. So the broad lines are: More expensive within similar lenses almost always equals higher image quality. In other words, you get what you pay for. Differences show up as softness, blurry edges, vignetting, aberrations, etc. USM supposedly focuses faster and quieter ...


4

I'm going to step around the discussion of the 17-55 EF-S lens and its comparison to an L lens as thats a loaded question that has lots of heated debate surrounding it. To address the meat of your question which I take as 'I want to upgrade to an L lens, which one?' that depends on what you're looking for in a lens. Unfortunately there isn't a single L ...


4

I've been to the Sagarmatha National Park up to ~5500 m in autumn last year. I have a Nikon D90 and brought my ultra-wide angle, because I thought I need it. I didn't. It is way much too wide for the mountains. Everything gets very very distant with an ultra-wide angle lens like this. Believe it or not: I shot 90 percent of my photos with a fixed-focal 35mm ...


4

Really depends on what you are trying to do with it. Portraits, street, landscapes? I use a 50mm 1.8 (1.4 is too soft) on my d200 and it is perfect for portraits and some street level shooting. In my mind 75-85mm is where you want to be for people shots so 50mm on a DX is about right.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible