Alley in Pisa, Italy

by Lars Kotthoff

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30

EF-S lenses are specifically designed for APS-C digital bodies and optimized for the fact that they have smaller sensor and mirror. EF-S lenses are marked with a white dot on the mount instead of red one that EF-glass has, and can be only used on EF-S compatible bodies (almost all of smaller-sensor Canon DSLRs, up to EOS 7D). Film and larger-sensor digital ...


28

There are currently two types of Canon lenses: EF and EF-S. The EF lenses will work on any modern Canon EOS camera (including both the XT and the 60D). The EF-S lenses will work on some digital Canon EOS cameras, including the Rebel series, XXD series (including the 60D) and the 7D. You can see a full list of supported cameras on wikipedia's EF-S page. ...


22

The "S" in EF-S stands for "short back focus", which means that the rear element of the lens is closer to the image sensor than on regular 35 mm SLR cameras. The proximity of the rear element to the image sensor greatly enhances the possibilities for wide angle and very wide angle lenses, enabling them to be made smaller, lighter ...


19

There have been stories for years of mail order (and now online) retailers that pull a scam that goes something like this: You respond to an ad for an insanely low price on a lens. They accept your order and bill your credit card. A few days later they contact you to say the exact lens is out of stock, but they will sell you the upgraded version for only ...


18

The Nikon mount is far older than the Canon one. Nikon have updated their old (OLD!) manual focus lens mount continously, adding new mechanical and electronic connections to it over the years to support new features. Canon started with a blank sheet of paper on their EOS mount in the late eighties and did not even try to maintain backwards compatibility. The ...


17

Metal mounts are generally able to withstand wear and tear better than their plastic counterpart could. This is especially so for higher end lens that are heavier because of increased amount of glass elements and/or heavier, sturdier components that are used in the construction of the lens. For example, a Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8 weighs around 1.4kg. If ...


13

Any EF fit lenses you own (usually marked with a red dot near the EOS mount) will work fine with the 5D mkII Any EF-S fit lenses you own (usually marked with a white dot near the EOS mount) won't work or fit the 5d mkII, as these are designed to fit crop sensor cameras like the T2i and not full frame sensors like the 5D mkII As an addition, some non-canon ...


10

It is very unlikely that Canon will dump the EF-S mount any time soon. As you note it was derived from the EF mount, which is significantly older but still going strong. In fact, Canon's introduction of the EF-M derivative last year, if anything, indicated Canon is nowhere near phasing out the system. Camera mounts are not replaced nearly as often as other ...


9

I think the much more practical and affordable solution here is the traditional one: hire an assistant. As a bonus, that also replaces a lighting-setup robot, a hold-this-reflector robot, and a hey-couldja-get-me-a-coffee robot.


8

Nikon has the longest flange to focal-plane distance, so you can't use lenses meant for other 35mm lens-mounts on Nikon cameras (the lens would be too far from the sensor/film to focus to infinity). The exception might be if you were doing closeup/macro photography and didn't care about infinity focus. There are some medium-format lenses that can be adapted ...


8

You don't tend to get telescopes designed for a particular camera, what you need to look for is a telescope camera mount for your 60D. This is a device which replaces the eye piece on the telescope with an EF mount which the camera is connected to instead of a normal lens. The adapter usually consists of two parts. A 'T' adapter which fits directly onto the ...


8

EF-S are not just optimized for APS-C cameras, they are made for those only. In other words, they will NOT work on full-frame models or even APS-H ones. The imaging circle the project is smaller which lets them be made lighter and more compact than equivalent full-frame lenses. The FLM (Focal-Length Multiplier) still applies when comparing the angle-of-view ...


8

I have an Olympus body (E-PL1) and a Panasonic lens (100-300mm zoom), and haven't noticed any special problems. It feels kind of silly to have 'paid' for in-lens stabilization that I keep turned off, but even when I've accidentally knocked the switch into the on position, it doesn't ruin the average shot (it makes for odd effects during long exposures on a ...


8

I think this may be what you are after, this one even does video :-)


8

The potential problem is that the sensor or the glass cover over the sensor is electrically charged whilst it is switched on, so if you take the lens off, it will attract dust. Search the web for sensor cleaning, but it is a subject that divides photographers. Some only ever get their sensors professionally cleaned, others do it themselves quite often. ...


8

First of all, the idea that manufacturers have the incentive to facilitate the sharing of lenses is not exactly economically sound from the manufacturer point-of-view: they would rather hope that one is locked in a given system (obviously customers hope for the opposite). Second, different mounts arise from history: there are various tradeoff to be made, ...


7

I use an older Pentax 50mm f/1.7 on my 60D and get spectacular results. I have the exact adapter shown in your post and it works great with barely any play between the lens and body. The only problem with old glass is that it typically has poor handling of flare so be mindful of light sources and use a hood.


7

F-mount lenses are locked in place by a small metal pin that pulls flush with the lens mount when you press the lens release button. This pin would be in the three-o'clock position when you're looking where the lens mount would be. On auto-focus bodies like your D90, there's a second pin for the focus motor that does the same, and it's at the seven-o'clock ...


7

Canon also announced the Canon Mount Adapter EF-EOS M when they announced the EOS M camera. The adapter is said to be available in October 2012 for $199 USD. It is compatible with the full range of EF and EF-S lenses that are currently available. This also includes the full range of third-party lenses that currently work with the available EOS bodies. The ...


7

To directly answer your question, it introduces more variables that can cause damage. Keep in mind the mechanics of an interchangeable lens camera. You have mechanical and electrical links between the camera and the lens. Having the power on means that there could possibly be gears moving or a current moving between the two and you'd be interrupting this ...


6

EF was the mount for the new EOS system that replaced their FD mount in 1987. EF-S lenses are specifically designed for the smaller APS-C sensor size, like on the Rebels. They're not compatible on full-frame cameras. These cameras have a white square on the mount's surface, along with the typical EF red dot that all EOS cameras have.


6

EF-s lenses are a slightly different format whereby the rear element sits closer to the lens, this is possible due to the smaller mirror with APS-C sensor. The distance from the back of the lens to the image plane is known as the back-focus distance, hence the s in EF-S standing for short back focus. Other manufacturers have lenses designed for smaller ...


6

I suppose one of them is screwed clockwise, as usual, and ther other is screwed the other way, counter clockwise. But I don't know for sure, because I use Pentax K-mount... Seriously, though... they have different flange focal distances: Canon EF-S mount, 44.00 mm Pentax K mount, 45.46 mm Nikon F-mount, 46.50 mm It means, that through adapters you ...


6

Yes and they should all work. All of mine certainly do. The first thing Sony did when acquiring Konica-Minolta's camera division is release DSLRs with the same mount. These were named Alpha which is the same name Minolta used in Japan, they used the Maxxum name in North America and Dynax in Europe. In other words, Sony Alpha mount IS the Minolta ...


6

The Nikon SLR lenses are designed such that the image circle falls on the sensor/film plane based on the distance from the sensor to the mount (flange focal distance). For an SLR, this distance includes the space needed for the mirror. As the Nikon V1 doesn't have a mirror, the distance from the sensor to the mount point is substantially smaller, so in order ...


6

Have you considered using a Nikon J1 with an adapter? The J1 has an electronic (rather than mechanical) shutter and is totally silent. The J1 can be had for a song these days, as it's one or two generations behind the current model, and it even has a time-lapse function (something most older DSLRs will lack). However, Nikon's adapter (called FT-1) is ...


6

The Canon 10D is designed to take any EF lens that Canon manufactures. Although it has an APS-C sized sensor and mirror, it was designed before Canon introduced the EF-S lens line. Because it has the smaller image sensor, some third party lenses made only for APS-C cameras will work. For instance, the Tamron 17-50mm f/2.8 Di II will mount on any Canon EF ...


5

Just in case the question comes up, Canon FD lenses are NOT interchangeable with the current Canon line. The FD is the previous generation, so... Also, for a complete list of cameras that support the EF-s mount, see the wikipedia page. Of note is that the 10D is not supported, or similarly old cameras.



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