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33

The hood has peaks and valleys because the image is rectangular and thus has a wider field of view horizontally than vertically. The cutouts are needed to prevent the hood vignetting (casting shadows) in the corners. Basically if you imagine a cone getting slowly wider, and then you punch the view frustum through it (to prevent any occlusion of light making ...


26

A lens hood has two purposes - one is to shield the lens elements from stray light - either directly from the sun, from passing cars, from a flash, etc. This stray light can cause lens flare and reduced contrast, so it is best to limit it. Its also useful for avoiding bumps to your lens or filter. I use mine a lot in the car, because my lens is always ...


24

The petal design is more effective. Think of what you can see through your lens: it is a pyramid-shaped chunk of space that falls within your view, one that has a rectangular rather than a square base. Now imagine placing a round lens hood atop that pyramid - there will be a large gap on each side, because the corners bump into the round opening first. A ...


22

It should be fine, but watch out for shadows if you are using flash. Wide angles lenses, particularly with APS-C / DX, tend to throw a shadow, especially with on camera flash. Having the lens hood on makes this shadow bigger since it's adding a few inches to the end of the lens. See Len Abrams answer below for the benefits of a hood in long exposure shots.


18

You don't have to abandon the lens hood!!! Hoods are good a blocking the sun, eliminating solar flares AND most importantly protecting your glass. Do this...set your camera on a tripod (or table or pile of books or anything stable) and go to your widest angle avaible to you, with the lens hood on, and shoot a picture. Then zoom in a touch and do it again. ...


17

The reason for using a hood is to block light rays from elements outside of the actual frame (stray light) to enter into the lens and degrade the image quality (lowering contrast). Effectively, it "shades" the lens from these rays. Since a sensor is rectangular, valid light rays that fall on the corners arrive from angles larger than light rays that fall on ...


16

If anything using a lens hood is more important in low light than in normal circumstances. I do a lot of low / available light photography with long exposures (20 - 30 secs) where glare and flare are often a big problem which you cannot easily anticipate as you do not 'see' these effects with the naked eye under low light conditions. I always use a lens ...


11

Here's an image that may help people to visualise why lens hoods are petal-shaped.


11

As Chills stated, petal shaped hoods are designed to better take into account the wider shape of a camera's film or sensor. This article on Lens Flare has a good description of lens hoods and how they function.


11

Unless the lens hood is in the way (for example if you are using a polarising filer that you need to access, or when putting the camera in a camera bag), there is no reason to remove it. On the contrary, it does offer some protection for the front lens element, so leave it on as long as you can. Unlike for example an UV filter, it doesn't introduce any more ...


10

In addition to the already good posts, and likely forthcoming posts, I'll give one less common but equally important tip. Don't forget that using a lens hood will make it less likely that you'll cause damage to your lens, improving the quality with less dust and scratches on your lens.


10

The hood protects the lens of physical impact from knock and obstacles. It also reduces flare and keeps image quality to what the lens is capable of. A UV filter protects against flying dangers such as sand, salt and other elements. While doing so a UV filter is detrimental to image quality as it adds additional reflections from another glass element in the ...


10

A filter offers more protection than a hood alone. I have had a filter save a lens from certain severe damage when a lens hood failed to do so. How much UV filters affects image quality is a much debated subject. I have added a comment on this at the end - mainly pointing to some objective measurements. Here are the test results for the best UV filter in ...


10

Most of the difference is explained at Why are some lens hoods petal shaped and others not?, with the remaining question being the cost. And, I don't think the basic cost premise is correct. See cheap tulip hoods at B&H, where they start at $4 -- a dollar less than the cheapest circular hood. So the answer to "why are tulip hoods more expensive?" is... ...


8

As someone who's done years of in-arena Pro-Rodeo photography, I can give you another great use for a lens-hood: Protecting the lens element from fences, walls, gates, rocks and anything else the front of the lens hits as you're scrambling for safety. Once you've seen the paint marks appear on a lens hood after bouncing off something at a high rate of speed ...


8

The supplied or purposely built hood is the safest to use on a lens. While you can easily find a hood that fits the lens, getting one which works as well is a matter of luck. Even it a hood fits, it can still cause vignetting. I learned the hard way since two of my hoods have the same size :( If you do not accidentally get one which a too narrow field of ...


8

The ES-52 works a little differently than most lens hoods we are accustomed to seeing. Instead of blocking off-axis light by extending a cylinder perpendicular to the image plane and centered around the optical axis, The ES-52 blocks extraneous light by placing a smaller circular opening parallel to the image plane. Due to the difference in design, perhaps ...


7

That particular lens has a rotating front element which is undesirable for a number of reasons, one being that you can't attach a hood without it rotating (the other main reason being certain filters are orientation sensitive, such as a polarizer, graduated neutral density and these will also rotate when focussing). There is an official non petal shaped ...


6

I don't think it exists as the shape of a lens hood is determined by the angle of view of the lens, you would need a different step-up hood combo for every different filter diameter and every different focal length. Also screwing on a filter inside the hood would be fiddly. What you want is a lens hood that attaches to a 77mm filter thread, but then I fear ...


6

Every time I accidentally bump my lens hood into a wall, my leg, a sign, or another person I am reminded of why I have a hood on my lens all of the time, even when there's not an obvious flare situation.


6

You need a round one because the front element will rotate when it zooms/focuses.


6

Some lens hoods are an equal size, all the way round (such as for telephoto lenses) whereas others (for medium to wide lenses) protrude more at the top and bottom than they are wide, so I think the answer to your question is NO. There is no single lens hood that will fit all your lenses. The one for 18mm would not be suitable for 300mm. That said, if cost ...


6

A fixed universal lens hood would not work. The hood is designed to block light that is just out of shot. Such light can't contribute to the image in any way but can bounce around inside the lens and cause flare. What is "just out of shot" depends entirely on how wide your lens is. Light that is just out of shot for a 300mm image will be mid frame in an ...


5

The Canon EF-S 18-55mm lens has a rotating end, which is used for focusing (i'm sure you're aware of this). So a petal-based hood is definitely the wrong choice for this lens. That Amazon seller is marketing it wrongly, IMO. You'll find that higher-end lenses have a fixed (rotationally speaking) end, and so can be used with a petal hood. My advice would be ...


5

For wider angle lenses the optimal design is the petal shape. This is because of the rectangular sensor and wide field of view.


4

I can see two reasons for the hood to block the view: The hood is not correctly positioned. The hood is not made for the angle of view of the lens. From what I could find, it's a tulip shaped hood. The shape is supposed to make it usable with wide angle lenses, but it has to be turned to a specific angle to work properly. The longer petals should be at ...


4

In general hoods are not interchangeable, the mounting mechanism is more complex than a screw thread. There are probably examples of hoods that can be shared but this is the exception rather than the rule. You can buy generic rubber hoods which are designed to fit on most lenses. The same is true of tripod collars, unless you're lucky. There is a large ...


4

I've used knock off hoods for many of my Canon lenses that weren't supplied with one. I've never had a problem with fit or vignetting, at least not due to the hood. Some of those lenses had so much peripheral illumination drop-off you might as well call it vignetting! I've always bought them from fairly well known dealers such as Adorama or through ...



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