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29

Nanocoating: New and Different! To more specifically address the "Nano Crystal Coating" type of lens coating, as other answers seem to be either addressing multicoating in general or think nanotechnology coating is just a marketing term. Nanocoating is actually NOT the same as multicoating, it is very different in design, and affects light in a different ...


3

Coatings are just special chemical compounds that are applied to the surface of glass filters and lens elements in order to change their optical properties usually in order to reduce reflections and other unwanted effects, as well as repealing water and grease, and providing resistance to scratches.


3

No, it is not. EBC is described as "multilayer coating": All the lens elements used in the X-S1 have been treated with multilayer Super EBC (Electron Beam Coating), Nanocoating however is NOT multicoating, it is a different process.


3

The lens elements will have anti-reflective coatings, as all modern lenses do. There may or may not be an IR filter over the sensor, certainly many early camera phones didn't bother with IR filters (using the camera you could see IR LEDs such as the ones found in the wii sensor bar). Apparently Apple only introduced an IR filter in the iPhone 4S and later ...


3

Most likely not. The lens coating would have to be removed before it could be reapplied in most, if not all cases and that would likely end up deforming the lens itself. You could always completely replace the element if it is sufficiently damaged to be a problem, but it is unlikely that minor issues with the coating are going to cause significant issues.


2

I've had scratched anti-reflective coatings on eyeglass lenses removed in the past. Since the coating had been on the lenses for a few months it did not all come off but left a slight tint over the entire lenses. I chose not to have them re-coated because I figured I would also scratch the new coatings. It would probably be more economical to replace the ...


2

sometimes my iPhone is able to take better pictures of sky, clouds and the beach than my SLR can. In the latter, I have to adjust exposure, add polarisers/NDs to get exact same kind of colours, contrast and saturation. This will not be due to the coatings on the lens but to the image processing, specifically the contrast and colour saturation. It ...


2

Pentax patented "Super-Multi Coating" in 1971 while still making M42 lenses. This coating is still in use today and I'm not aware of anything actually doing much better with the exception of another Pentax coating. Which means, to answer your first question: there's no difference. :) Bojidar Dimitrov has a a very good writeup on the Pentax SMC and what it ...


1

I don't think the Nano crystal coat improves sharpness in and of itself. What it does, however, if give the lens designer more freedom in designing the lens. Before coatings came into use, practical lens designs were limited to about 5 element groups (at very most). Single coating increased that to around 7 or 8. Multicoating increased it to around a dozen ...


1

I guess the most important reason for using subwavelength anti-reflection coating are the problems related with strong curvature of lenses. Multi-layer AR coatings work perfect for flat surfaces and lenses which are not too much bended. For the strong aspheres used for example by Nikon in all new zoom lenses like 14-24 f/2.8 see Nikon Precision Glass Mold ...


1

Here's a description of Pentax's implementation of nanocoating, called Aero Bright Coating (source): ...[the] PENTAX-original Aero Bright Coating...ensures outstanding anti-reflection performance over a broader wavelength range to deliver images that are brighter and of higher quality. Created using PENTAX’s advanced nanotechnology, this exclusive ...



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