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1

A focal reducer doesn't follow the conventional wisdom that a teleconverter reduces image quality because it works in a completely opposite way from a teleconverter. Are you familiar with why "crop factor" exists? A full frame ("FF35") lens projects a circle about 43mm in diameter into a camera. A FF35 sensor is 36x24mm and so records most of that circle. ...


0

I'm curious if it's worth using a focal reducer on a Nikon AF 300mm f4 on my Sony a6000 is worth it, or is it better spent saving the money to get a FF body to "match" the lens? Why can't both be true? You linked to Roger Cicala's blog post about the Metabones at LensRentals.com – why not go ahead and rent one, and a FF body as well, to test them out? ...


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My question here is, what is the conventional wisdom stated above Looking at the post you referenced, author Matt Grum describes the conventional wisdom: However, the statement "when you add elements to a lens, you make the image worse" is not true absolutely... He goes on to explain that it is indeed possible to add elements that improve lens ...


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There is a good option now, using a Canon EOS M camera (which sensor is closer to the rim) and something like the FOTGA Canon FD Mount Lens to Canon EOS M EF-M Mirrorless Camera adapter ring. No glass and with infinite focus. dream come true.


1

No, that would not be the correct adapter. The Maxxum 7000 was the first camera to use Minolta's new A-mount; quoting from Wikipedia: [The Maxxum 7000] introduced a new lens mount, the A system, breaking compatibility with its earlier manual-focus lenses in the MC and MD system. Unfortunately, it's not quite possible to make a glassless A to EF ...


2

The answer would depend upon the degree of tilt and shift one wishes to effect. An image circle needs to be larger to accomplish 12º of tilt than to accomplish 8º of tilt on the same sensor. Likewise, a small shift movement requires a smaller image circle than a larger shift movement does. With a traditional lens the center of the optical axis is aimed ...


2

How large does the image circle have to be to get it to project correctly on the image sensor? This part of the answer deals with the shift of the lens only. The answer for the tilt is much more complicated (i.e., I haven't cranked out the maths). In order for the image to be projected onto the sensor, without any clipping at the corners of the sensor, ...


3

Other answers have already said what I'd have said, apart from the fact that the only reason I'd use one of these adapters is if I had Canon lenses and you want IS. Having IS is arguably the most useful advantage these adapters offer, as shooting with adapted lenses with dumb adapters is quite simple. I'm looking to use my husbands EF 24-70 f2.8 II and ...


1

Brian Smith has a roundup of various adapters for Sony E-mount cameras to mount many different types of lenses. In the "Canon EF to Sony E-Mount Lens Adapters" section, he lists the following adapters: Metabones Canon EF to Sony E-Mount Smart Adapter IV ($400) FotodioX AF Adapter for Canon EF to Sony E-Mount ($100) Viltrox Auto-focus Canon EF/EF-S Lens to ...


2

The Sony A100 will work natively with all Sony A-mount lenses, as well as the older Minolta AF lenses (some of which are excellent). As for m42 lenses, there are tons of those, from various manufacturers. Some are very nice and others are dogs. All will be manual focus of course, and the aperture you will have to control manually on the lens as well.


1

There are a bunch of different factors, but yes, you can adapt both Minolta AF and Minolt MC/MD lenses to micro four-thirds--you can adapt practically every SLR mount to micro four-thirds with simple rings, and with an Olympus body you'll have stabilization as well. But. If they're Minolta AF lenses, you won't have an aperture ring on the lens by which to ...


2

Yes, it works, but you'll need to remember the crop factor. Micro 3/4 has a crop factor of two, so an old 50mm lens will feel like a 100mm lens. Look here for a good explanation: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crop_factor



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