Lightnings taking a ride

by ceinmart

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You will need an adapter. I don't know what brand your 'old camera' was, but if it was 35mm, then you will need to use the lens in manual mode on your D5100. Autofocus, aperture or shutter priority, program mode, will be non-functional. I am using my old Minolta MD lenses on an Olympus E-1 DSLR with very satisfactory results. I bought adapters on Ebay - ...


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If these are Leica-M mount lenses, then you cannot adapt them to any dSLR mount. The registration distance (how far away from the image plane the lens has to be held) is much smaller with rangefinder lenses than SLR lenses. You'd end up interfering with the mirror path if you jammed the lenses far enough into the camera for the lens to achieve focus to ...


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This depends on what kind of bayonet or screw those lenses use to mount on a camera. Basically you should look for xxx to Nikon F adapter, where xxx is the mount type used by the lens. You will likely need a correcting lens adapter, since the Nikon has the longest flange distance of any camera manufacturer and focusing to infinity becomes practically ...


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- Canon to E-Mount - Viltrox EF-Nex II Auto-Focus adapter - I own a "Sony A7 II", I still have a "Canon EF 16-35mm F4L IS USM" and a "Tamron SP 24-70mm F2.8 Di VC USD" from the Canon equipment that I used before. So I bought a "Viltrox EF-Nex II Auto-Focus Canon to Sony E-Mount Adapter" to use these lenses on my Sony body. 1st of all, the AF is really slow ...


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I do the same thing with my Canon 100mm macro lens and I can't see any difference whatsoever in the photos, since the adapter is built NOT to cause any vignetting. In the end, if you are happy with the results and don't notice anything wrong with them, why not leave it on? Mechanically, there's nothing that say you shouldn't do it.


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Try a rubber band wrench from an auto parts type store, or rubber gloves with your fingers and palm evenly spaced around ring. Don't squeeze too hard--just enough to make even contact. You can also put Anti-seize compound, from the same type of store, on your fingertip then onto the threads. Only coat the threads very lightly; it will spread around when ...


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If you want to avoid mirror collision issues with a Canon full frame altogether, shave the mirror, get a 1‑series camera, or (mostly) avoid wide angle lenses. Learning about mirror collision is just part of the fun and games when it comes to adapting manual lenses to the Canon prosumer full frame bodies. I think the only brand of the six that are ...



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