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by Bart Arondson

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17

If you shine a torch (flashlight) on a wall and walk forward, the circle of light gets smaller, but brighter at the same time. The principal of the speed booster is the same. A lens designed for 35mm projects an circle of light at least 43mm in diameter onto the sensor. The sensor in an APS-C format camera has a 28mm diagonal. The "speed booster" ...


12

Generally I'd say it's not worth trying to adapt an FD lens for the EF mount. The reason for this is that the EF mount has a larger registration distance, that is distance from the sensor the mount so that any simple FD to EF adaptor will act like an extension tube and you wont be able to focus beyond a few meters! Canon produced an adaptor with a glass ...


10

Don't even think about it, exchange it. Putting an FD lens on an EF body requires using either an adapter with an optical element (loss in image quality + focal length multiplier) or an adapter without an optical element (loss of infinity focus). Either way, if you want to use an old lens on your Canon, there is a huge selection of other cheap, decent glass ...


10

You'll never regret buying the focus confirm adapter once you forget how much you had to pay for it :-). "Auto confirm" is akin to "poor man's AF", and allows you to achieve, in many cases, close to AF results with far less effort or thought or concentration than pure MF takes in extreme conditions. With auto-confirm you have to "think" a lot less and can ...


10

Sadly for Nikon users, the F mount has one of the longest registers ever. (Mechanically) adapting a lens designed for a certain system to one with a shorter register is easy: just manufacture an extension tube of the correct length. The ability of controlling the lens will be mostly lost but this is less of an issue with lenses with mechanical aperture ...


9

I think the much more practical and affordable solution here is the traditional one: hire an assistant. As a bonus, that also replaces a lighting-setup robot, a hold-this-reflector robot, and a hey-couldja-get-me-a-coffee robot.


9

No.* The micro four thirds to four thirds adaptor is basically a tube which mounts the four thirds lens further from the sensor. In order to do the reverse you would have to mount the micro four thirds lens closer to the sensor, which is not possible as there is stuff in the way! *at least whilst preserving the ability to focus at moderate distances.


9

In short, because there is no room to do that, without prohibitive cost in additional optical elements. The lens and body are designed to provide the correct distance between the optical elements and the sensor. On a Nikon, that distance is on the order of 45mm (from memory, it can be looked up somewhere or measured on cameras with a reference mark on the ...


9

You'll certainly want the largest sensor you can get your hands on. Currently APS-C mirrorless systems are available from Sony, Fuji and Canon and Samsung. I wouldn't choose Canon as it's the least mature system with only one camera body, which lacks any sort of viewfinder. Samsung is out, as the flange focal distance is 25mm, only 2mm shorter than M mount, ...


8

Breaking down your question: Is it worth the effort? If you already own lenses and don't want to spend money on digital lenses, you could say it is worth it. If you don't want to fiddle with the manual focus, it's not worth it. If you have to use this in an environment where fast focusing is critical, then no, it's not worth it. This is a bit subjective. ...


8

I think this may be what you are after, this one even does video :-)


8

It's 1.6 for EOS M - it is based on sensor size and EF adaptor makes EF lenses work the same as for DSLR APS-C cameras. Even though EF M lenses are mounted closer to sensor, they are still marked standard way (with regard to correctly estimate field of depth) so it finally comes to sensor size alone.


8

LensRentals.com had quite a lengthy article on this subject a couple of days ago. Basically it works by focusing the amount of light going through the lens on to a smaller area, optimized for the smaller sensors of mirrorless cameras. This increases the light intensity of the image being captured, giving a "1-stop aperture increase". I'll just link to the ...


8

You will crop away the outer edge of the image and this will cause you to lose the highly distorted edges of the photo. this is particularly obvious when you are dealing with a very very wide angle where normally a circular image would be seen but due to the crop you see a square image. This review of the Canon 8-15mm fisheye contains a picture how the ...


7

Well, obviously its real. (It was even linked in our own chat). Without having used the device, the only real benefit here is probably increased 'optical zoom' from the ability to put larger lenses on the iPhone. You'll probably end up with quite the zoom range if you stick a longer lens on. Because you're probably taking a crop out of the intended image ...


7

Here's this device's basic problem: It's $250 for a device that is basically a gimmick. Aside from the initial humor of pairing your professional L glass with your decidedly not-professional cell phone camera, there's little to gain from this. The Pros Portability You'll be able to leave your pesky camera body behind! You know, that thing that weighs ...


7

There is no such thing as a universal lens. The shape of the connection, position of the contacts (and electric protocol too), distance between the connector and sensor are all different. There are adapters to bridge the gap which are mostly used for legacy lenses. The reason is that with those adapters you will lose most communication between the body and ...


7

Canon also announced the Canon Mount Adapter EF-EOS M when they announced the EOS M camera. The adapter is said to be available in October 2012 for $199 USD. It is compatible with the full range of EF and EF-S lenses that are currently available. This also includes the full range of third-party lenses that currently work with the available EOS bodies. The ...


6

Short answer: yes, but you won't like the results. Longer answer: those old lenses sure are fun :) ... but you still won't like the results. Here are some details: There are adapters, and you can by cheap glassless ones (that won't allow infinity focus -- they basically act like extension tubes) or adapters with glass to allow infinity focus but that have ...


6

The Nikon TC-16A did just that. You could mount a fully manual lens, and it would basically convert it to AF, but as RBerteig says at a considerable cost and loss of a full stop. For that reason it was meant to work with f/2.8 or faster lenses. You would also lose some focus range. And being a teleconverter, you obviously have a 1.6x focal length ...


5

FD lenses are designed to sit closer to the film/sensor than EF lenses - so there is no adapter that can just place the lens in the correct location (because the correct location is inside the camera where the mirror is). This leaves us with to options: Adapter that places the lens farther than it's supposed to be - this has the same effect as placing the ...


5

First of all, this leaves only .5 mm for the adapter, which isn't a lot. With a mount that's a lot smaller in diameter most of the adapter could sit inside the EF mount ring, and you could probably do it. From what I recall of the diameters, they're similar enough that this would be extremely difficult, if possible at all (and I'm leaning toward "probably ...


5

It's possible, but not practical. Assuming someone somewhere makes an adaptor so you can actually mount the lens (or you do something low-fi like glue a Nikon body cap to a Canon rear lens cap) then you will be able to take photos, and focus at macro distances. However, all Canon EF lenses have electronic aperture control which means you wont be able to ...


5

Consider this an addendum to Matt's answer which is quite sound to me. Given your circumstances, I would strongly lean towards the Fuji system. Since you do not care about native lenses, you will avoid Fuji's biggest shortcoming which is a minimal set of native lenses. Image quality is absolutely top-notch with both the X-Pro1 and X-E1. My preference is ...


5

No. Even, if someone would build an adapter it could not possibly fully work. One normally adapts a lens for a larger format to a camera with a smaller format. Going the other way, as you suggest, would place a lens with a small imaging circle compared to your sensor or film and result in clipped edges. other words you would only the center which kind of ...


5

A good web store like B&H has a list that seems to satisfy that criteria. http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/buy/Lens-Adapters/ci/3420/N/4077634486 There you can use filters like Brand (manufacturer) Camera fitting side (male side of adapter, camera mount) Lens fitting side (female, lens mount)


4

The adapter bridges the gap in flange distance (distance between mount and sensor/film) between the NEX native E-mount (18mm), and the MD/SR mount (43.5mm). Therefore, the focal length of the MD lens isn't affected, it's still at its native flange distance from the sensor. If you were to adapt an MD lens to a mount with longer flange distance (i.e. canon ...


4

There are two possible issues with adapters: A cheap adapter may not be machined to a high standard and be outside acceptable tolerances. This could affect focusing, or even damage the mount, though this is unlikely. Screw mounts may be slightly to big or small, and lenses could get stuck in them if the metal binds. Some lenses may collapse behind the ...


4

It depends on the mount, and on whether you can accept an optical element in the adapter. Canon's EF mount has a very short register, which means a lot of lenses for other mounts can be adapted simply with an adapter that moves the lens a few millimeters away from the mount. However, with other mounts you need to get a lens element to achieve infinity ...



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