Nidelva river through Trondheim Norway

Nidelva river through Trondheim Norway
by Saaru Lindestokke                

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23

The main reason is that it is low powered. An raster LCD - color or not - requires much more power and most of them need a permanently on back-light. New OLED display do not need the back-light but still pull more power than a segment-based LCD which has much fewer electronic circuits. Most current top-plate LCDs mirror what is shown in the status line of ...


21

In general there are the following advantages of manual focussing via the optical viewfinder instead of the LCD: The viewfinder image is almost certainly sharper than the LCD, when viewing the entire image. This makes it easier to judge when something is in focus for the times when you need to be able to see the whole image at once (e.g. for a scene that ...


15

Read the histogram, not the image on the LCD. In addition to errors because of screen brightness vs ambient brightness, the image on your screen is corrected by your camera before showing it on the screen. Most cameras allow you to adjust that, to remove saturation/sharpening adjustments, but you're still trying to judge your raw image based on an "edited" ...


15

You activated by mistake an advanced view mode. You can switch between view modes by pressing "info" (or maybe "display" for you) when in view mode. The view switchs in that order (sorry for image quality) : Classical View : your photo and some settings and nothing else Classical View with more information : your photo, some settings image quality ...


13

The LCD brightness is in no way related to the photographs taken by your camera. It's usually just a way of saving some battery power as well as being able to bring down the brightness in dark locations. However, it may cause you to think your photo is unexposed when it potentially isn't, if used on a low brightness setting. In this case, it's better to ...


12

Given that the actual screen on Canon cameras is already mounted behind a rather solid transparent plastic plate from the factory, third-party screen protectors are not actually screen protectors. They are screen protector protectors.


10

Actually it is slightly more misleading. 480,000 pixels normally equals 1,440,000 dots but they do get away with only 480,000 actual dots (not pixels) by using something called field-sequential display which is basically 480,000 dots which change colors very fast, sending information for each primary color sequentially. There are only 480,000 dots but since ...


9

And on top of Matt Grum's almost exhaustive list, viewfinders won't eat up your batteries. (Except if the viewfinder is electronic, but that's luckily quite rare)


8

Don't just look at the photo, but look at the histogram, too! Often when looking at just the photo on an LCD, you can't get a good feel for under- or over-exposure, or even color balance, but if you look at the histogram (especially the RGB histogram if your camera model supports it), it will be immediately obvious if something serious is off.


7

LCD brightness affects your perception of the photo, not the photo. At worst, a poorly adjusted LCD will cause you to make bad settings decisions. Make your decisions based on data in the histogram to avoid such errors. The goal when adjusting brightness is that white areas emit as much light as a white object would reflect. This means the LCD should be ...


7

I do not own a Nikon D5100 nor have I used one. From my research online, I believe that the Nikon D5100 does not in fact have a feature such as "Live View Exposure Simulation". This is what you are looking for. Unfortunately, this feature is non existent in Nikon's current offerings. It is common for Canon to have this feature though - that is why you are ...


6

You could install the Magic Lantern custom firmware which is now supported on the Canon 60D. In addition to being able to load up custom safe area masks which simply display directly onto your LCD, there are a whole host of other video-related features (zebra stripes, anyone?) and functions that aren't included with the native firmware. The only potential ...


6

Draw the desired shape on an adhesive LCD protector and stick that on.


6

There are at least two types of LED displays. As explained by @Pete, a normal LCD-display with LED back-light instead of fluorescent tubes / strips. This is the kind you'll find in stores today. Displays with Red-Green-Blue LEDs without the "LCD" part. Sony just released TVs with this technology. It's comparable with OLEDs in that both generate the colours ...


6

Resolution first, given that size does not vary much lately (2.7-3"). That lets you check sharpness and focus better, particularly if you use Live-View. Rotating or tilting (vary-angle) can be useful for somethings but is also a liability since it can break. No Pro cameras have such displays because they need to be tough first. You forgot the viewing ...


6

A back-of-camera LCD is not designed, and should not be used, for gauging exposure based on the brightness of the LCD. As noted by Dreamager in a comment, you can adjust the brightness of the LCD and that might better approximate how things look on your computer. Whether or not your computer is displaying an image accurately depends on if it's been ...


6

Segment LCD is a technology with the lowest power consumption of all available display technologies and those are more than visible on sunlight or any kind of strong light without any need for background lightning (except at night). Very useful for battery operated devices. It's also the cheapest possible display technology. They are also extremely robust. ...


5

For the last 2 years I've been using a Dell Studio XPS 16 (with Windows 7) and in terms of image quality it's far and away the best computer screen I've ever used. Although this model is no longer available to buy new, I'm sure there are comparable models. I wouldn't hesitate to buy the same again, although it does have some drawbacks. Specific pros and ...


5

I think zooming about 50-80% tells if an image is sharp or not, and I don't think there are any better solution to check in the field. It's true that in the LCD screen pics always look beautiful and you've got big surprise when you transfer them to a mac/pc with a large screen:).


5

No, the camera LCD is not better than a laptop screen. Often the gamut of the camera LCD is smaller than a laptop, too. This article discusses some of the issues around the camera LCD. Another factor that you didn't mention but should consider is monitor calibration. If your laptop's display has not been calibrated then you really need to address that first ...


5

All of the mentioned advantages and disadvantages of an accessory EVF are true, except that I also tend to leave my accessory viewfinder attached to my Ricoh GR at all times, so there's no real risk of losing it. But as much as I like having mine attached, I only use it for about 5% of my photos. I would not buy an EVF for the NEX-5R. Part of this is simple ...


4

The LCD is great to check for sharpness on-the-field but you need to know your camera's 100% magnification ratio. When you zoom-in into the LCD view, most cameras display a magnification ratio as X times from the fit-to-fill size of the LCD. So initially, it is one and when you get to say 4X, the image is magnified 4 times in both directions. As you keep ...


4

It's good to have a screen protector for camera LCD even if you have a flippable one. This will ensure you don't get the oil from your nose onto the LCD while looking through the viewfinder. This way you wont be afraid to push your eye closer. I used to look through the viewfinder from several inches away just because I didn't want to ruin the LCD screen ...


4

Other answers cover everything, but to be blunt: it's marketing bullshit. They are counting each of the three color components of the pixels (red, green, blue) as a "dot". People have been making color displays for decades and only recently has this ridiculousness arisen (for displays, you hear these "dots" called subpixels). On the other hand, for sensors, ...


4

I'm a bit skeptical about what they are stating. It says that the viewfinder is "1,440,000 dots equiv". The "equiv" term is an annoying marketing term used when trying to be competitive without stating the true nature of something, they are simply stating it is "equivalent to" such a thing. The Electronic Viewfinder is "equivalent" to a "1,440,000 dot" ...


4

Generally, you press the DISP button to cycle through the various display options, one of which is off. No experience with CHDK, but that's how regular Canons work. Editing much later to add: I have since installed CHDK on my S90, and the DISP button works the same as with the stock firmware. So simply pressing it should cycle you through basic display, ...


4

If you are using the viewfinder rather than the LCD, I'm not sure what you could possibly do. A DSLR uses a mirror to redirect light from the lens to the viewfinder and away from the sensor. I guess it might be possible to use a very small macro camera that could be mounted to the viewfinder itself, but I'd think the quality would be marginal compared to ...


4

Yes, yes and yes. An EVF is extremely advantageous over the LCD and I would just keep it on most of the time. No need to take it off, even in the camera bag, assuming it fits. The advantages you list are all correct: Holding the camera steady is easier because you have it closer to your body and there is an additional point of contact. Framing is also ...


4

If I am understanding you correctly, it sounds like you are taking a photo with the aperture set to less than the smallest f/ number possible for the lens. When you use a smaller aperture (larger f/number) then the image is darker and the depth of field is bigger (resulting in a sharper background). When you look through the viewfinder, the aperture is ...


4

You can't, the Nikon D200 is too old to be able to read the sensor in realtime in order to show you the image on the LCD screen. That feature was introduced with the D300 / D90



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