Incense

by Bart Arondson

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7

You can also select the area you want to crop to with the rectangular marquee tool, invert your selection, then delete the now selected outside area. This is different from the layer mask in that it completely deletes the surrounding area, whereas the mask makes the surrounding area invisible.


7

I didn't have enough "reputation" to address some of these answers as comments. AJ Henderson is wrong, 30 1s exposures will (for the most part) be identical to 1 30s exposure. If it shows up in a 30s exposure, then stacking 30 1s exposures will also show it. I am actually the author of the article that Trengot linked (thanks!). In fact, unless you are ...


6

There is a method that can yield some good results given good enough original photos. I don't have the original article on hand, but I can describe the method, but it's up to you to find the particular details that you need to get your desired results. Let's start by merging just two images. Load them in a single Photoshop document's layers. It doesn't ...


6

Use a layer mask. Tutorials galore exist on the topic already, eg: http://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop/using/masking-layers.html Straight from Adobe: You can add a mask to a layer and use the mask to hide portions of the layer and reveal the layers below. Masking layers is a valuable compositing technique for combining multiple photos into a single image ...


6

This is easy. First, if you don't have the Layers window open go to the Windows menu and choose it. You don't actually need that, but it's handy. It's a small "utility" window which typically floats near the right side of your screen. And open your file, if you haven't yet. With that window open, you can click on the existing layer in the image (probably ...


5

Yes, that's pretty easy. Let's assume your image in in the background layer. You need only one layer mask actually, and that layer mask will be in layer A, on top of the background layer. Put your other layer B on top of A. Now press the Alt key and move your cursor right in between the two layers in the layers panel. The cursor should change to some kind of ...


5

Fundamentally you're capturing the same amount of light in either case so the results should be the same. Practically, there are 2 differences between stacking 30 one second exposures and shooting one 30 second exposure. The first is the light lost between each one second exposure after the shutter closes before it reopens for the next exposure. This can ...


4

Think of that layer as the actual 'image'. That is a simplification, but it serves a point. If you duplicate it, feel free to remove it. Or you could just drag the lock-icon to the trash-icon and edit the background layer directly. I usually duplicate the background layer and do my sharpening on the duplicated layer, so I can go back, reduce the sharpening ...


4

Yes, two ways I know of: Go to the channels palette. Select the channel you want. Ctrl-click (Cmd-Click on a Mac), to copy the channel. Then go back to your layer and add your mask or create a blank, white mask on your layer make sure the mask is selected go to Image > Apply Image select the channel you want from the channel dropdown click ...


4

The comments have really answered the question here: The behaviour you're seeing is as you should expect. The settings for adjustment layers alone have no equivalence in any of the TIFF content standards. TIFF does allow for vendor specific extensions and this would be an example of one but saving to a nonstandard TIFF would be pointless if nobody could ...


3

Instead of merging the layers together, try to convert them to a Smart Object. The smart object contains all the original layer data (which also can be later edited — just double click the smart object), but appears as a "single layer" in the Layers window. If you now apply the Unsharp Mask filter to the smart object, it is created as Smart filter and ...


3

In short, no. What you're doing is not really related. Layer masks are basically ways of working with the alpha channel of a layer. Adjustment layers aren't really layers at all — they're ways of thinking of filters within the same metaphor. They don't actually accomplish anything you couldn't do simply by applying the filters in the traditional way. ...


3

In the Mask tab you can select regions of the picture that you don't want Hugin to use in the final panorama. You just have to be careful to not mask out a part of the panorama that only exists in that low-res picture, because then you will get a hole.


2

I may be wrong, but I don't think that what you are looking for is feasible. The layer opacity is called that because it applies to the whole layer, and the only thing you can do is make part of the layer more transparent by increasing alpha, not less. If you want to modulate higher, then you must select either 100% opacity for that layer (probably the ...


2

Open both documents select the group you want to move and now you have 2 options: Right-click on the group (in the layers tab) and click "Duplicate Group..." Under "Destination" change the value "Document" with the target document (the one that will receive the Group). The layers will be aligned to TOP-LEFT. Drag and drop group of layers in the second ...


2

When shooting, make sure the lighting is similar for best results. It wouldn't surprise me if the photo of her standing up was taken right before or after the main one in the same place. Then, it is a matter of removing the background from the photo that you want to nest in. It can be done with some automated techniques if the background is a different ...


2

This explains how to merge multiple short exposures to mimic the effect of a longer exposure. It's aimed at emulating ND filter photos but the principal should be the same. The basic premise is to take multiple shorter shots and then use a tool like Hugin to align and ImageMagick to convert them into in a single image. The result is effectively the same as ...


1

If the people and shadows are darker than the background, you can use Darken layer mode (and possibly a rough mask to limit the effect to the people in the upper layers. You could try Difference or Subtract layer modes, take the result of that and use Apply Image to create a mask. Or you could use image stacking: select all layers, Layers > Smart Objects ...


1

That is layer blending (possibly with a mask). It's also not particularly well done in my opinion. The easiest way to do that particular effect would be to put the background (the sunset) on a layer beneath the photograph of the two people. Adjust the layer blending to be around 50% or so and then use the eraser to remove the top photo wherever you only ...


1

Unless I am missing something, if your final step before sharpening is to copy all the previous layers and merge them into a single new layer...then you should only have to apply sharpening to that final layer. The nature of sharpening algorithms generally won't allow them to work seamlessly "across" multiple layers. Even if they did, I'm not sure why you ...


1

This appears to be a bug within the type of Color Lookup profile. The abstract profiles can be duplicated, while the 3DLUT and Device Link fail. You will also notice that the Color Lookup layer will persist across changes to the document bit depth only when it is an abstract profile. The layer will be removed with either of the other profile types. The ...


1

I can't believe no one suggested this yet: Just use the rectangular marquee to select what you want to crop down to, and COPY it to your clipboard. Then delete the entire layer and PASTE what you copied to a new layer. This is especially useful if the layer you're cropping is larger than the canvas, in which case the select-inverse technique is messy.


1

You'd most likely want to use one of the marquee tools. This will select an area in a crop like fashion and you can then delete the inside or the outside by right clicking and selecting 'select inverse'. and that is how i crop inside one layer :)


1

No, you can't crop a single layer. The closest thing would be to copy the layer to a new image, crop that image, and copy the layer back to the original image. It's easier just to erase or mask the part of the layer that you don't want.


1

Open both documents. In the source document, select the group of layers you want to move, and drag them (from the layers palette) onto the other document. Easier to drag/drop if you don't have windows displayed in tabs (use Window > Arrange > Cascade.


1

Works for me in CS5.5 and CS6 Beta, but I don't have the full CS6 yet. Have you converted to a Smart Object first? Layers/Smart Objects/Convert to Smart Object. The only reason the Stack Mode would be disabled that I can think of, is if the selected layer is not a smart object.


1

Well Shadow/Highlights will darken highlights and lighten shadows. In Overlay mode, lighter grays will lighten and darker grays will darken. So if you want to darken a highlight, you need a darker gray. To lighten the shadows you need a lighter grey. In other words, you need an inverse of the original image, to some degree. What I would do is start with ...


1

After you make your adjustments in ACR, press Shift and then instead of Open Image, you'll see Open Object. That will create the layer as a smart object and you can then go back to ACR from that smart object layer. I believe you'd have to have known to do that from the start. I'm not aware of anyway to reopen a layer in ACR after the fact if you haven't ...



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