Serene Life

by garik

submit your photo


Hall of Fame
View past winners from this year

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

attached you will find two photos I have taken, exposure manually Not just dynamic range, but mostly how it is used and how it is exploited. Such shots need to be exposed correctly, and camera settings need to be low contrast, low saturation and no sharpening; most of the cases lowest possible ISO too (in case of Sony, 1 stop over the lowest ISO because ...


0

No, you're not doing something wrong, and yes, this is a dynamic range issue. It's very common no matter the camera, and typically becomes more common the smaller the sensor format. The RX-100 is actually better than most P&S cameras in this regard. In a situation like this, if you're shooting JPEG, and not RAW, you may want to use the RX-100's HDR ...


1

The term you're looking for is dynamic range, which is the difference between the brightest and darkest areas. If this was shot in RAW I would be surprised if you couldn't pull the highlights back and recover the detail in the clouds, but if this was a JPEG then it's simply a case of the camera not being capable of knowing which bright areas to darken and ...


1

I believe simply cropping the lower third would improve the image greatly. It's a excellent photo of the bridge and the gorgeous foliage, but there is so much green it takes away from the bridge and the pair of people on it. The crop would also remove the distracting post and brown area. Simply put your hand over lower third to see if I'm right. More ...


4

As user32334 notes, there is a lot of personal preference in a photo. It may be easier to change friends or ignore opinions than to try to please everyone :-). I won't start to try to give general advice as '32334 has done. I looked at that and decided that my chances of improving on it were small. Instead I'll take the opposite tack and just comment on ...


6

To put it in old-school terms, you have a good negative here. It just needs to be printed properly. That means local manipulation of brightness and contrast. I can give you some suggestions that will allow to to create my picture, but it would be best for all concerned if I gave you some suggestions that will allow you to create your picture. First off, the ...


0

I'm not so sure that landscapes are usually taken with "big" apertures. However, there is a reason large apertures make sense in some situations. When there is nothing close to the camera in the picture, as can be the case with landscape shots, most of the scene will be at infinity focus. In that case there is no benefit from a larger depth of field, so ...


2

Most of the time, a "big" f-number is recommended for landscape photography. But a high f-number such as f/16 or f/22, when dealing with APS-C or FF cameras, means a very narrow or small aperture. The large aperture is at the other end of the scale at f/1.4 or f/2. See What is aperture, and how does it affect my photographs?


7

You didn't explain where you read this, or what the meaning of "big aperture" means to you - so I'll explain. Certainly you can shoot landscape photography at whatever aperture you wish. Shooting with a wide open aperture is not the most common aperture selection for most landscape photography though. By wide open, I of course mean a wide aperture such as ...


1

Perhaps one should mention that Ansel Adams shot his famous image "Moonrise, Hernandez" with an 8x10 camera (i.e., the film size was 8"x10", and the crop factor would be 0.14x). Now, granted, a view camera allows lens/film movement (tilt) so you can also use the Scheimpflug principal to increase the DoF, but generally speaking, no, shooting any currently ...


1

Landscape photography typically uses apertures at the sweet spot of the lens' sharpness which are usually narrow enough to allow for large Depth of Field(DoF), yet still wide enough to avoid problems with diffraction. Remember that the larger the pixel size of a sensor is, the narrower the Diffraction Limited Aperture will be. My 18MP APS-C camera has a DLA ...



Top 50 recent answers are included