I Dare You!

by peter_budo

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0

I was privelaged enough to be able to take a picture of a solar eclipse. Here's what happened when I took the pictures. Perhaps this will be of use to you. "Before" the eclipse happened I took some test pictures. To my disappointment the sun ended up setting behind the mountains before the eclipse ever came. Then as I was going back through my pictures I ...


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Hopefully you shot raw. Then you can come a long way with 3 mechanics: highlights down to bring out more detail in the sky vs snowy mountains shadows up, to make hte details in the gorge more visible for the human eye. if noisy in black part because visible, adjust black level down to remove that. clarity up. when people are in thw photo clarity over 15 ...


3

I wouldn't change the image at all. You could lift the shadows slightly with the shadows slider or even increase the exposure(which would require compensation of highlights to save the sky), but I don't think this image needs either. If you did lift the shadows it would all start to look pretty mute which to me is not desirable. You have more options if ...


1

There is an app for IOS called PhotoPills. Input shooting parameters, then using your phone's camera it uses augmented reality to project the point of hyperfocal distance.


2

The article you cite is not very good advice if you want great sharpness for landscape photography: it’s based on the concepts of depth of field and hyperfocal distance. These concepts are intended to help the photographer find the required aperture for getting barely acceptable sharpness across the relevant parts of the picture. What the author (like many ...


0

not to restate what has already been said, but there are good apps for smart phones which calculate hyperfocal distance for you. one app in particular i have for iphone that i would think be helpful to your understanding of this is called DOFmaster. you can plug in your focal length, f-stop, and select the HD button and it will produce your hyper focal ...


3

If your objective is to get as much as possible of your subject in focus and you know in advance that most of your subject is beyond the half-hyperfocal distance then this may be helpful advice that simplifies the focusing process in setting up your shot. However, there are at least a couple complicating factors: The hyperfocal distance changes with the ...


8

Then why don't we set the focus distance to be the nearest as possible, as this will achieve the maximum depth of field? Because it won't. If you focus on a point closer than the hyperfocal point, then the depth of field gets shorter. Infinity is no longer in focus. So the best would be to focus on the object at 0.4m, as it will cover 0.2m to ...


1

With an ultrawide zoom vs. a prime, particularly with a lens designed for APS-C (crop), the main advantages are versatility and availability. When you get to the very short focal lengths, a single millimeter on the focal length can change the composition significantly. There is also the issue that depending on how you define "wide angle", you may not be ...


6

Focusing at a point closer than the hyperfocal point loses the depth of field at infinity. For example, if the hyperfocal point is 1.2m, and you focus at 1.2m, then your depth of field is from .6m to infinity. HOWEVER, if you focus at a point closer than 1.2m, say 1.0m, your depth of fields drop to between .55m and ~6m. You can see the effects subject ...


0

I'm actually considering making the opposite move, buying a 50 mm prime lens for landscape photography. While it looks very useful to be able to zoom out to get a good field of view, this comes at the expense of the resolution. It's better to take images with a high focal length and then stitch a high resolution image together (e.g. using Hugin). Usually, ...


2

There's no sharp limit between in and out of focus. Everything but the focal plane at some exact distance is out of focus, it is just so slightly so that we don't notice it. There are two reasons why somebody would choose focusing further than the hyperfocal distance - the first being that when you focus exactly on something further than hyperfocal distance ...


2

Zoom lenses have more versatility since they can, well, zoom. If you want to get a picture of a specific portion of the landscape, or if you spot a wild animal, you may consider a zoom. The main disadvantage is that zoom lenses usually have a smaller maximum aperture when compared to prime lenses, and are more susceptible to geometric distortion when you ...


1

Of note to photographers: It should be pointed out that the cause of aerial perspective is the same as what causes sky color and (and this may interest photographers) the sky is also the light source for all shadowed ares in outdoor photography. Thus the light spectrum below is actually also the light spectrum for your average light source for all areas in ...


1

Here is an example of the Sony Zeiss 35mm f/2.8 on the A7ʀ at f/5.6: And here's a crop of the extreme bottom left corner (right click -> "view image to see it at 100%"): Sharpness in the corners is very impressive for a 36 megapixel sensor. Chromatic aberration is well handled by lightroom, I've not had any problems with it I don't have the Loxia to ...


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Don't look into the viewfinder. Compose everything through live view (possibly block viewfinder with DK-5 Eyepiece Cap) and your eyes will be safe. The biggest problem of solar eclipse is that sun will suddenly pop up into the image, when your aperture is not ready for it. Use auto exposure in a mode that will allow it to close aperture, eg P or S mode, as ...



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