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48

I think Stan said it best in regards to composition and light, but I'll try to be a bit more specific about your pictures. What are you trying to show? This is the most important question to ask yourself before clicking the shutter. If you don't know, or don't address it, the audience won't know either and the picture will look sortof "pointless". Your ...


45

You can digitally enhance your pictures by increasing the brightness and adjusting the contrast. You can also crop out any parts of the image that don't contribute to the impressive nature of it. Take advantage of angles to convey attributes such as size and distance. Using perspective can also help liven up your images. I think the main concern is that the ...


27

The mountain and the valley obviously are static -- even more from that distance. The clouds, however, move. If you chose a low ISO value, e.g., in the range of 50 to 100, the exposure time might be enough to get washy/faded/blurred clouds. If I calculated it correctly, an ISO value of 100 with the other settings (exluding shutter speed) staying the same ...


26

This picture, and others similar to it, aren't pictures of the woman. These are travel snapshots, with some landmark and a woman in the same frame. There's nothing wrong with such snapshots per se. In fact, they're pretty great: they show where you were, remind you of the good times, and they're not anything like the travel postcards you could buy, even ...


15

There's been some really excellent answers already but let me provide some additional pointers from a beginner point of view. Learn the technical part. You've bought a DSLR so learn to use it properly. If you were only worried about composition and you're going to shoot on auto then you may as well have bought a point & shoot camera. Learn to expose ...


14

There are two issues at work that are causing your results to be a little soft: Diffraction Since you are using an EF-S lens it is safe to assume you are using a Canon APS-C camera. Most of the recent models have pixels pitches that cause diffraction to begin at around f/6.8-6.9. This is the point at which the affects of diffraction begin when viewed at ...


13

f/16 will give you sharper image than f/1.4. Yes, diffraction does kick-in at f/16, but it's still not as bad as the optical flaws that are pronounced at f/1.4 in pretty much every f/1.4 lens out there. (see: tests of your particular lens, resolution charts) Also lens coma and astigmatism are worse when lens is wide open than when it's stopped-down. That's ...


11

I agree with most of the answers here. At the same time your question is a variation of the very common «How can I make this image pop». Usually what that means is «please increase the contrast». Here is a quick attempt at explaining what that means. Rough list of changes, most of these assume you are using a tool like Lightroom: Increased exposure and ...


10

EF-S 10-22 or Tokina 11-16/2.8. :D Sorry. Neither one of these is ideal on a crop body as a landscape lens. The fisheye has too much distortion and would require defishing if you ever wanted a straight horizon anywhere other than the center of the frame. And defishing will cost you the edges of the frame, so it won't be super-super-wide (which is why you ...


10

I can't think of any technical reason for this to be the case. Even assuming that he used the lens at 105mm, if he was more than 387 ft from the closest object in the frame, he could have focused at 750 feet and had everything in focus even at f/5.6, so f/22 was completely unnecessary unless intending to get the shutter speed longer. A faster shutter speed ...


8

This is a photo of Rodney Lough Jr. from the Wilderness Collection, called "Day Dreaming". You have to select the image at the bottom of the page for more info and the high resolution version. It says: Camera: Toyo 4x5 AII Field Camera Lens: 210mm Aperture: f64 Exposure: 45 Seconds Film: Professional Fuji Velvia The softness is coming from the long ...


7

If so, which would be more advisable? Assuming you don't have stability or motion issues and depth of field is not a concern then f/16 would be more advisable than f/1.4 as ultra-fast lenses show several image degrading aberrations when the aperture is wide open. However f/5.6 would probably be better still, as diffraction starts to kick in past this ...


7

You didn't explain where you read this, or what the meaning of "big aperture" means to you - so I'll explain. Certainly you can shoot landscape photography at whatever aperture you wish. Shooting with a wide open aperture is not the most common aperture selection for most landscape photography though. By wide open, I of course mean a wide aperture such as ...


6

It is indeed difficult, if not impossible, to tell at times. Here's a list a strategies I might use to tell the difference: Look for contextual clues. Even a tiny recognizable feature could reveal the cardinal direction. Atmospheric clarity. During a sunrise, the dust has had time to settle at night, making the sky clearer than at sunset, where there is a ...


6

The photographer chose a slightly higher ISO to compensate for using f/22 aperture (small opening = less light). You may ask, so why not make the shutter speed longer? The shutter speed was set to 1/6th of a second, rather than say 10 seconds, so that the image is nice and sharp, it may have been windy and might have shaken the tripod even just a little bit. ...


6

There are a few different ways to emphasize crepuscular rays in post production. 1) One of the ways those crepuscular rays can be enhanced is with any tool that can provide volumetric lighting effects. The one I use is a tool called Rays from Digital Film Tools. As you mentioned, this type of tool may be the type to add fake rays to a photo. However, I ...


6

To put it in old-school terms, you have a good negative here. It just needs to be printed properly. That means local manipulation of brightness and contrast. I can give you some suggestions that will allow to to create my picture, but it would be best for all concerned if I gave you some suggestions that will allow you to create your picture. First off, the ...


5

Most new photographers are in the same boat. Get the good camera and expect that to do the real job of photography. Like buying Jimmi Hendrix's guitar and wondering why I still can't play. We were all there at one time. The language of photography is spoken mostly through composition. A well planned frame conveys the story line to your scene. Study ...


5

One answer mentioned that the cloudy backdrop dulls the pictures. I disagree, I think that clouds can add a lot of character to an otherwise uninteresting aspect of an image. In this case, the clouds don't really "pop". A bit of processing with a raw processor could help bring something out in those clouds. In particular they look like they might have been ...


5

You should not use the smallest aperture available, you should use an aperture that allows you to focus at an hyperfocal distance that puts both the foreground and infinity in focus. If you use an aperture that is too small, diffraction will make the image soft. You will get a great DOF, but most of that will be beyond what you need to get your subject in ...


5

I have the 14mm and use it with a T3i (still a crop body). I like it for what I get but I wouldn't consider it the best option. If time is not of the essence, I would recommend this: Canon EF-S 10-18mm f/4.5-5.6 IS STM Lens. It's only preorder at the moment, as this lens hasn't been released yet. It would, however, leave you with a lot more options than ...


4

There are some things that two dimensional photos have trouble doing. One of them is portraying a place we experience in three dimensions and translating that place into two dimensions without something being lost along the way. OMNIMAX/IMAX Dome theaters try to deal with it by curving the screen around the viewer so that the visual experience includes the ...


4

You say "I have one small focus point, but if I am shooting the entire skyline, wouldn't it throw the rest out of focus? Or should I change to Manual Focus?" This suggests to me that you have a basic misconception about how focus works, and that understanding that better will help with the whole problem. No matter how it's done, a camera lens can only ...


4

If anyone is interested, my colleague and I have developed a free tool for computing the actual sunrise and sunset times for any location worldwide, accounting for terrain. The image in the example is for Chamonix in France. I'm a photographer myself, and that was one of the reasons why we made this. Very useful when going on a shoot. Just go to ...


4

I'll tell you right away that there is no chance for me to answer without being very technical. Since you're looking for an open source solution it cuts away all of the commonly used programs and leaves us with a bunch of programs that require more from the user. The advanced part has nothing to do with photography though. The technicalities lies in ...


4

As user32334 notes, there is a lot of personal preference in a photo. It may be easier to change friends or ignore opinions than to try to please everyone :-). I won't start to try to give general advice as '32334 has done. I looked at that and decided that my chances of improving on it were small. Instead I'll take the opposite tack and just comment on ...


3

Using a DSLR is not a magic key to creating lovely photographs. You could be using the best camera in the world, but if you're not thinking about composition and light, then you are going to get (very high quality), but not very interesting pictures. If you think a bit about what you are framing, you can take great shots with a mobile phone camera. Point ...


3

Lighting is key. As already mentioned, you have taken your photo with the sun more or less directly behind you, and one thing you have to note about the sun when getting into photography is that it dulls colors! Landscape photos are very dependant on good lighting: without it, the colors will be boring and the photo will have this 'flat' look as you mention, ...


3

Depth of obvious to us in the 3D world but when things get translated into 2D via photography, we lose depth-perception and the brain must therefore interpret signs in the images in order to see its depth. The primary perception of depth in photographs are objects at different distances. As our eye sees these objects in diminishing size, we interpret them ...



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