Time to be with your loved ones

Time to be with loved ones

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43

You can digitally enhance your pictures by increasing the brightness and adjusting the contrast. You can also crop out any parts of the image that don't contribute to the impressive nature of it. Take advantage of angles to convey attributes such as size and distance. Using perspective can also help liven up your images. I think the main concern is that the ...


42

I think Stan said it best in regards to composition and light, but I'll try to be a bit more specific about your pictures. What are you trying to show? This is the most important question to ask yourself before clicking the shutter. If you don't know, or don't address it, the audience won't know either and the picture will look sortof "pointless". Your ...


26

Depth of field depends not only on aperture but also on distance to the subject. Depth of field increases as the subject gets farther away. If the wave and boats were all relatively far from the camera, but not terribly far from each other, then it's not surprising that they were all reasonably sharp. You can use DOFMaster to run the numbers yourself. Some ...


15

There's been some really excellent answers already but let me provide some additional pointers from a beginner point of view. Learn the technical part. You've bought a DSLR so learn to use it properly. If you were only worried about composition and you're going to shoot on auto then you may as well have bought a point & shoot camera. Learn to expose ...


10

There are two issues at work that are causing your results to be a little soft: Diffraction Since you are using an EF-S lens it is safe to assume you are using a Canon APS-C camera. Most of the recent models have pixels pitches that cause diffraction to begin at around f/6.8-6.9. This is the point at which the affects of diffraction begin when viewed at ...


10

I agree with most of the answers here. At the same time your question is a variation of the very common «How can I make this image pop». Usually what that means is «please increase the contrast». Here is a quick attempt at explaining what that means. Rough list of changes, most of these assume you are using a tool like Lightroom: Increased exposure and ...


8

Landscape photography is usually done with a short focal length and small aperture - but that doesn't mean you have to - you can use a large aperture, a long focal length or any tool/technique you want to use - having your own style that is different than the standard is a good thing. The reason landscape photography is done with a small aperture is that ...


8

This is difficult to answer because each one of us has different shooting styles, goals, and preferences. Here is my big tip: Less is more Hiking is much more enjoyable when your pack is as light as possible. Five extra pounds of unnecessary gear can turn a fun trip into a chore. You might consider 1-2 lenses that aren't that heavy, or you might even be a ...


6

It is indeed difficult, if not impossible, to tell at times. Here's a list a strategies I might use to tell the difference: Look for contextual clues. Even a tiny recognizable feature could reveal the cardinal direction. Atmospheric clarity. During a sunrise, the dust has had time to settle at night, making the sky clearer than at sunset, where there is a ...


5

For camera equipment on a day hike, I take one body and two lenses (18-55mm and 55-250mm) a tripod, wired shutter release, a waterproof case with my memory cards inside, spare battery and polarizing filter. You can see more in my blog post at http://www.thecreativescorner.com/2012/08/21/my-new-ultra-adaptable-and-inexpensive-camera-daypack/ Some of my ...


5

One answer mentioned that the cloudy backdrop dulls the pictures. I disagree, I think that clouds can add a lot of character to an otherwise uninteresting aspect of an image. In this case, the clouds don't really "pop". A bit of processing with a raw processor could help bring something out in those clouds. In particular they look like they might have been ...


4

You admire a view that really impresses. To convey the same view to other people you take a photograph. Low resolution gives the viewer an impression of impressive view, but high resolution (and large print) really impresses the viewer. No, of course it is not the resolution that impresses, but the feeling that you are not looking at a photograph, but ...


4

Well, the statement that "resolution is of utmost importance for landscape photography" is questionable in itself. As far as I'm concerned, the highest priority in photography is taking a great photo, so composition and timing are of the utmost importance. However, high resolution is always good. For landscape photography, you pretty much nailed the ...


4

There are some things that two dimensional photos have trouble doing. One of them is portraying a place we experience in three dimensions and translating that place into two dimensions without something being lost along the way. OMNIMAX/IMAX Dome theaters try to deal with it by curving the screen around the viewer so that the visual experience includes the ...


4

You should not use the smallest aperture available, you should use an aperture that allows you to focus at an hyperfocal distance that puts both the foreground and infinity in focus. If you use an aperture that is too small, diffraction will make the image soft. You will get a great DOF, but most of that will be beyond what you need to get your subject in ...


4

Most new photographers are in the same boat. Get the good camera and expect that to do the real job of photography. Like buying Jimmi Hendrix's guitar and wondering why I still can't play. We were all there at one time. The language of photography is spoken mostly through composition. A well planned frame conveys the story line to your scene. Study ...


3

Difficult to say without seeng an example. But taken from the few describing words it sounds very much like a dynamic range issue. If so then a gradual ND filter could help - depending on the concrete composition of the image - or you apply some HDR techique. HDR, if properly done, does not need to thave this horrible ovedone "HDR style". Those pictues can ...


3

If you want to shoot landscape at f/2.8, you want to use a shorter focal length (let's say, between 12mm and 24mm —or between 8mm and 18mm if you use APS-C sensors) : the depth of field will be less impacted by the large aperture if the focal length is short. e.g.: a 8mm fisheye at f/3.5, with the focus set to hyperfocal, will provide you an "infinite" ...


3

I'd dare to say the correct exposure is whatever is needed for the artist to get the effect he or she desires. That might be technical perfection, but it might also be deliberate over- or underexposure used to get specific artistic effects. I've used this myself to get seriously blown out highlights, causing a winter beach scene to look like a desert under a ...


3

Ansel Adams developed the Zone System to allow him to select the exposure levels of specific objects in his photos in relation to other specific objects with different luminosities rather than basing the exposure on a single meter reading of an object with the approximate average luminosity of the overall scene. We often forget that cameras have only had ...


3

I'm not sure if this is a "how is exposure defined" question or an "is my camera busted" question, so I'll try to address both. :) Definition of proper exposure ISO standard 1271 contains a definition for photographic exposure. Bypassing the math, "correct" exposure averages a scene's luminance and renders that luminance at a particular (but arbitrary) ...


3

The "correct" exposure may vary some from one image processing system to another, but the general goal is to make the darkest and brightest parts of the image both fall within the dynamic range of the camera with a good white balance and natural contrast. The bright and dark part is easy if the scene doesn't exceed the dynamic range of the camera since it ...


3

If anyone is interested, my colleague and I have developed a free tool for computing the actual sunrise and sunset times for any location worldwide, accounting for terrain. The image in the example is for Chamonix in France. I'm a photographer myself, and that was one of the reasons why we made this. Very useful when going on a shoot. Just go to ...


3

Depth of obvious to us in the 3D world but when things get translated into 2D via photography, we lose depth-perception and the brain must therefore interpret signs in the images in order to see its depth. The primary perception of depth in photographs are objects at different distances. As our eye sees these objects in diminishing size, we interpret them ...


3

Lighting is key. As already mentioned, you have taken your photo with the sun more or less directly behind you, and one thing you have to note about the sun when getting into photography is that it dulls colors! Landscape photos are very dependant on good lighting: without it, the colors will be boring and the photo will have this 'flat' look as you mention, ...


3

Using a DSLR is not a magic key to creating lovely photographs. You could be using the best camera in the world, but if you're not thinking about composition and light, then you are going to get (very high quality), but not very interesting pictures. If you think a bit about what you are framing, you can take great shots with a mobile phone camera. Point ...


2

Do not take a DSLR and a couple of lenses and a tripod. Rent a Fujifilm X100s. Take it and nothing else. When hiking, your most important criteria is weight, and second, size. David Hobby has written extensively that its the only camera he takes when he is going light. Review: http://strobist.blogspot.com/2013/03/in-depth-new-fujifilm-x100s.html traveling ...


2

I would like to add two addendums to the two excellent answers. Time. Landscape images and especially landscape prints are often looked at for much longer than other types of photographs. Yet, the longer we can stare the more we will notice the little defects and blemishes; the more we become tempted to step closer. Have you ever notices how visitors in ...


2

I came across a website called Pashadelic. From what I can tell, they are trying to aid photographers find and discover great location for landscape photography. Their map is quite advance allowing you to load information such as panoramio photos and allowing you to see the sun/moon position. It's still in beta but I see a potential. ...



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