Nidelva river through Trondheim Norway

Nidelva river through Trondheim Norway
by Saaru Lindestokke                

Submit your Photo
Hall of Fame

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Hot answers tagged

17

Or am I misunderstanding how aperture works?...I thought the further away something is, the greater the depth of field. So when an object is three and a half miles away, it's going to have a huge depth of field! You're not wrong about that, but landscape photography often involves more than just photographing very distant objects. You often have objects ...


15

When used at the same aperture and focal length, a faster lens will have less vignetting than a slower lens. For example if you choose to shoot at 35mm f/4.0, then a 24-70mm f/4.0 lens will have the most vignetting, a 24-70mm f/2.8 lens will have less, and a 35mm f/1.4 prime will have the least vignetting. The reason this happens is because of tradeoffs in ...


10

A faster lens (= low F-stop) allows easier manual focus and better auto-focus, given the camera has AF sensors which can exploit faster lenses. For landscape however, there is usually enough time that there is not much to gain from this. Faster lenses often surpass slower lenses when stopped down to the same F-Stop (eg. f/8). The reason is not that a faster ...


8

In addition to increasing the depth of field in order to keep everything in focus, many lenses are also less sharp at wider apertures. Landscape on digital is best shot in the range of f/5.6 to f/11. Anything wider (faster, smaller number, bigger aperture) than f/5.6 will start to "soften" the image, and anything narrower than f/11 will lose definition to ...


7

According to author's annotation to the image at 500px, it was taken in desert of Medina, Kuwait. It was submitted for inclusion with Ubuntu by someone else, and luckily the Albanian photographer Shady S. was happy to give his permission. More generally, you'll need a location with no light pollution from surroundings. Technique-wise, have a look at already ...


7

I have done a bit of climbing with a DSLR, and a lot of hiking with one. If you're climbing with it, you don't want it on your chest, and if you want it accessible, you don't want it on your back. This means that most of your options are holster style bags. I have a tamrac one which happens to be shower proof when closed (in reality it's been more than ...


7

Consider low light conditions. If you can use a low F-stop, you can use a lower ISO. You'll then have less noise and higher dynamic range. Even with a tripod, you'll have more options if you only need an exposure time of, say, 0.3 seconds instead of 2 seconds. In very windy conditions the tripod may shake, but even in alight breeze tree branches may move a ...


5

This picture is a composition of slices of many photos taken from different heights, likely from a drone. The key to understanding it is to examine the camera's perspective or point of view from different horizontal slices of the composited image. For approximately the bottom quarter of the image, the camera is below the roof lines of the buildings at the ...


5

Is there a way to take a same set of images for a panaroma twice Yes. Simply do it a second time. You can be more consistent by using reference markings. For the tripod, that could be the join of tiles on the floor for example, a natural landmark like big stone that your tripod legs are touching, etc. You could also try marking the position the legs ...


4

I've tried to capture the rays of light in the forest many times, and have largely only had middling success. Eventually, however, I realized that the problem is one of contrast. The contrast between the dark forest and the bright light is what makes these scenes interesting. The solution is to increase the contrast between the rays of light and the ...


4

Faster lenses give you almost always better image quality than slower lenses at the same f-stop. This is true for vignetting, resolution and contrast, distortion and color. A faster lens also gives you a brighter look through your viewfinder or less noise on your live view display. Anyone who has tried to focus on a star at night knows how annoying a noisy ...


3

The focus on outdoors use and specifically the combination of backpacking and canoeing/kayaking make this a difficult recommendation, I think, if you are focused on learning photography instead of just "taking pictures." For backpacking, I'm not excited about the notion of taking a full-frame DSLR along. Back in the day I carried a film SLR a few times and ...


3

You could practice getting long exposures of roadways with moving cars, assuming you have some of those available... that's probably my most common reason for messing with an ND filter, since I don't really like the look of moving cars frozen in place. Image below is a 1-second exposure of the Arroyo Seco Parkway. Something that I just thought of to add ...


3

You don't need waterfalls, beaches, or volcanos to test what exposure length your camera can handle without excessive noise, ISO settings, tripod issues, sunlight versus cloudy, etc. You can test all that in your back yard. The only thing you can't test that way is optimal length of exposure for the effect you are trying to achieve. However, that is ...


3

Here's the text from the proposal that's causing the stir, and it's indeed troublesome to say the least: Considers that the commercial use of photographs, video footage or other images of works which are permanently located in physical public places should always be subject to prior authorisation from the authors or any ...


3

To capture images like this you will need The night of a new moon (the moon will wash out the image otherwise). You may be able to get away with a sliver of a moon as well. Log exposure, I usually opt for below the 30 second range so that you wont see star trails. Unless you are trying to shoot star trails they are fun as well. A tripod or something to ...


3

There is nothing particularly outstanding about this model for travel or landscape photography, but it isn't a bad choice either. It has some advantages such as an "all in one" solution where you don't need to carry multiple lenses, but it still offers a huge optical zoom range by any standard. Is it capable of taking images in as difficult situations as a ...


3

For your intended purpose there isn't a lot of difference between using a 700D or a 70D (The 80D, on the other hand, provides significant improvement in low light performance and dynamic range which is vital to most landscape photography). The 70D has very slightly better sensor performance, but the difference is well less than 1/3 stop in terms of dynamic ...


2

You could experiment with a graduated neutral-density filter which can partially "block" the light from the sky to bring the entire scene within the dynamic range capabilities of the camera sensor / film.


2

Your case is typical problem with high contrast/dynamic range situation. As no sensor can reproduce the dynamic range of the human eye, you can use several ways to create image which somehow represent your view of the light. The first way is to expose based on the metering of sky. This will help you not to lose details in bright areas and still have some ...


2

Another disadvantage not mentioned before is: Focus stacking takes a lot of time, in particular in the postprocessing phase. This is a multi-step process, (comprising at least align+stack). You need to get familiar with special-purpose software, and there are countless ways to try different parameter settings at the PC. Tiniest erros add up and must be ...


2

You can use a camera or lens that offers tilt capability. The zone of sharp focus doesn't get any wider, but it tilts. Example: the bottom of the frame is focused a foot away, the top of the frame is focused slightly past infinity. If that matches the way your scene is laid out it can appear you have insanely deep DoF even though the DoF at any given point ...


2

This might sound lame but you could use a hose or tap to make your own "waterfalls". Even putting objects in the way to change the path of the water and see what it does to the water trails. Try it at different times of day or different light to see how it affects the outcome. All my long exposures have always been a very digital age way of doing it. Try ...


2

I think the question is mainly about performance of various lenses. Set at 18mm your 18-105 will shoot the same field of view as the 18-55 set at 18mm. However that does not mean the pictures will come out the same. Generally speaking the 18-55 is a sharp lens across the range it servers (I dont own an 18-105 so I cant really comment). A lot of people really ...


2

I am no climber, but I'm a big fan of Peak Design's Capture Pro. It's a clip that you can attach to your backpack strap or harness. You use a standard quick release plate on your camera and can quickly slide the camera into the clip. To release it you press a release button (which can also be locked for extra security), and with a smaller camera like a ...


2

You have to shoot raw and then work with the contrast in post to emphasize the difference between the darker and lighter areas of the sunbeams. It usually looks better when you can do this by increasing contrast between the darker and brighter areas of the sunbeams without crushing the shadows into black or blowing the highlights that are outside the darkest ...


2

The problem here is that once you threw in "wildlife at a distance", you pretty much nixed most everything else except for dSLRs as well as the "starter" part of the equation. Wildlife, especially fast-moving wildlife, is a very specialized and equipment-demanding type of shooting that causes some of us to blow thousands of bucks on a lens and a higher-end ...


2

First of people have asked this question already before you: What are other popular composition techniques in addition to The Rule of Thirds? Here's my point of view: In painting these tips are the same. Research painting composition techniques instead of photography for composition. Painting's out there for a much longer time. A lot of photography elements ...


2

I've been struggling with this myself lately. Some things that I've learned include: Using leading lines to direct the eye towards interesting things in your photo Isolating your subject (which can be something interesting in your landscape) using focus, depth, color, or other properties Have some interesting foreground in photos of far away things Use ...


2

I enjoy DIY projects. A good quality square filter holder can be used with your home-grown versions as well as both round and square store-bought filters. You can use gelatin, glass, or plastic. That way you can also buy filters intended for other equipment so long as they are larger in diameter than your lens. You don't even have to cover the whole lens ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible