Moonlight

by Jakub

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3

It all depends on the specific camera model and the design of the sensor and the firmware installed. Many Nikon cameras with sensors made by Sony amplify the base signals by 1/3 stop intervals. Other Nikon cameras don't. Even some Sony sensors don't. As a long time Canon shooter, I can more fully explain how it works with practically all of their sensors ...


0

"This is all nitpicking?" I'd pretty much say "yes", particularly for recent Nikon cameras, all of which use Sony sensors which have the nice property of being "ISO invariant" - it doesn't matter if you turn up the gain in camera or do it in post-process as you get essentially the same result. Canon sensors, and the sensors used in older Nikons, don't have ...


0

A digital sensor only has ONE sensitivity, its one native sensitivity, probably rated ISO 100 for most DSLR today. All a sensor can do is to collect the light photons hitting its cells. It cannot attract more photons. :) Then basically, all any higher ISO setting can do is to multiply the existing data values, shifting the data up in the histogram, which ...


1

The answer is not that simple, also because of the compression scheme SONY are using. Technically, between ISO 50 and ISO 100 all that is supposed to happen is exposure meter shift, 1 stop. That is, ISO 50 shot is supposed to be ISO 100 shot overexposed by 1 stop, just as Mr. Grum wrote. However if one starts to split hairs and perform noise measurements, ...


1

They have lower level of noise, but also a lower ceiling for highlights. ISO 50 is effectively doing ETTR and then scaling back a stop. Whether or not the ceiling for highlights has been reduced too much is up to the scene and what you're trying to do.


6

ISOs lower than 100 on the A7 are not "real" in the sense that they don't lower the gain on the sensor, they just instruct the camera to increase exposure time as if the sensitivity was lower. The net result of this is reduced highlight headroom. If you shoot RAW there is nothing really to be gained from any ISO setting less than 100.


1

The term “Base ISO” or “native ISO” refers to the unamplified sensitivity of the camera. In other words, the base ISO is the single ISO setting at which your sensor/processing pipeline produces its best signal-to-noise ratio and where the sensor can achieve its full dynamic range. The ISO settings below the base ISO setting are usually marked “LO” to avoid ...


1

Nikon have free Nikon ViewNX-i: http://www.nikonusa.com/en/Nikon-Products/Product/Imaging-Software/ViewNX-i.html


5

Your camera saves this information, which we call "metadata" (because it is data about the data captured in the photo itself — one level beyond, or meta), in every file. There are many utilities which can read and display this. I'm not aware of any software designed for photography which doesn't — that'd include Adobe Photoshop and Lightroom, Picassa, and ...


0

At least on windows, you can see a lot of EXIF info in the file properties, details tab.


3

Once you take a photo, you can view Photo Information by clicking the Play button on the back of your D3200 and clicking the Arrow either up or down. More information can be found on page 98 of your manual. Aperture, Shutter speed, ISO, Focal Length, Focus Mode, Flash Mode, White Balance, and much more is all available via this menu.


3

(I think) Every digital photo has aditional data stored on it besides the image itself. That is called Exif data (Exchangeable image file format). A Dslr camera can shoot to a raw or jpg image file, and both formats include this data. Smartphones and compact cameras most likely shoot only in jpg, but it includes this information too. When you manipulate ...


1

There are many tools which can provide you this information: Lightroom, xnview, (probably) any graphic editor. Also any EXIF tool can provide you this info (check exiftool, its free and very good) P.S. For sure there is Nikon instrument, which can provide you such information, but I am not Nikon shooter :)


2

ISO (R) is not a speed number, it is log exposure range required to give the full tone (that is, full density range). The higher is the ISO R number, the softer is the paper. ISO R = 160 means density range = 1.6, or log2(10^1.6) = 5.3 stops. You may see it as "paper dynamic range under standard development". ISO R is used because contrast grade is in fact ...


1

"EV increases as ISO increases. This does not make sense to me..." Let's put this in plain English: Higher ISO film is more sensitive to light. In digitalese, a higher ISO setting makes the sensor more sensitive. If you are not careful you can overexpose your shots easily. "A high Exposure Value(EV)" means that the film will appear to have been dosed with ...


2

For a really insensitive paper, try blueprint paper photography or diazo paper photography. These sheets are comparatively inexpensive and are available in large sizes. You can even make blueprint paper yourself. See this on the blueprint process. And do post your images!



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