Shadowy Daisy

Shadowy Daisy
by damned-truths

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1

The essence of your problem is the high differential in brightness between the subject and the background. And you are forcing yourself to use a tight aperture to get the depth of field you want. Using a higher focal length lens and backing farther away from the subject will help with depth of field, but I know of only three solutions to the light ...


2

Do you want the short answer or the long one? Some viable options or the best one? The long one. I am worried here. There are toooooo many basic points on the question. So I am preparing a check list of points you must further investigate. I will just write a basic tip on each point. No bokeh: What aperture gives bokeh and which not? Do not use a wide ...


0

You could try positioning the model near to the entrance of the tunnel in the sunlight and then use a long lens to fore-shorten the tunnel so the far end looks large behind them. Also, consider what other light sources do you have available. Car headlights?


6

(Some people might hang me for this but) You could take two shots and photoshop/merge them together afterwards. To do this you would have to take two shots from the exact same spot, maybe use a tripod. Take the first shot with the right settings to get your desired exposure for the outisde bit of the tunnel. For the second shot with the model use either ...


1

If you don't want bokeh, the first step is to find the aperture your lens produces sharp results for the model and the landscape in the distance. Something between 8 and 11 might be OK. Depending on the light situation inside the tunnel you probably won't need full power output of your flash or none at all. This is something that really depends on the ...


0

If you have too wide a range of EVs, and if you didn't have a set of flashes, I suggest you: Make an HDR at 7 fps (or more) by using a tripod with a constant aperture value by using the bracketing option.Then you will be able to remove ghosts by using "photomatix pro" or another software. With a tripod also, take a separate picture of the model in the ...


0

Check to see if your Nikon uses the same flash metering algorithm as Canon - when set tot aperture-priority but with the flash on, the camera will sett he aperture & shutter speed to correctly expose the background (the outside of the tunnel in your case, but it might get confused if too much of the dark tunnel fills the scene) and uses the flash to ...


6

Sounds like you want the outside of the tunnel to be properly exposed and not blown out. Meter for that and with your camera set to full manual mode use the settings suggested by the light meter. Take some test shots to fine tune the exposure. You are limited with an on camera flash but try adjusting the power of the flash with the flash compensation ...


0

There are two plugins that really help when high ISO has been used: NeatImage and NoiseNinja. I personally bought and use NeatImage professional to get rid of image noise. It does a fantastic job but it cannot fix a bad shot! Shooting RAW is also helpful as you can change the exposure a few steps without destroying the image.


0

It just seems as though sometimes the simplest answer is often overlooked. I don't know how experienced you are with photo editing, but I just did a couple of very, very basic things to alter the picture you used as an example. It wasn't a big process using Photoshop either. (Not sure why my entire answer nor the edited photo didn't appear here, but my ...


0

D7100, I presume, doesn't have a spectacular high-ISO performance compared to commercial grade ones which I have heard to produce reasonably grain-free images even at ISO 2500. As long as you can fiddle with either shutter speed or aperture to get correct exposure, it's the best bet to keep ISO as low as possible. Aperture priority mode: If you have a fast ...


1

Not a completely technical answer, but if shooting at 1000 iso gives you too much noise in a low light situation, and using an exposure compensation of +3 with iso 400 works better, who can argue with that? It may be camera specific, but if your camera responds better with that combination, then I say use it! There's nothing right or wrong here; your results ...


0

I do agree with previous posters about the poor quality of that image, but you can fix things to some extent with software like Nik or Topaz Labs. A white sky can become (almost) beautifully blue with them and you can improve noise and other problems. Proper photography software like Lightroom or Capture One would do too, but it wouldn't be as easy. ...


1

ISO (International Organization for Standardization) specifies how photographic films are to be tested to determine their sensitivity to light. The ISO of any film is one of the key elements needed to calculate the camera exposure settings. Technically the ISO value is specific for films however digital photography embraces ISO thus the ISO settings of the ...


9

You're both right and wrong. Yes, technically the "ISO setting" is merely an amplification of sensor data. However the quantization (feeding the analog signal into the analog-digital converter) happens after the amplification. So, from the sensor (as in photosensitive die alone) point of view, the amplification doesn't change the actual light sensitivity. ...


3

Because the gain you set affects the image. The higher the gain, the brighter the resulting image from the sensor. While it may not specifically be the sensitivity of the sensor hardware to light that's affected, the sensitivity of the final image data to the light is affected by the iso setting you choose. Whether or not you use a gain setting of iso 100 ...


4

We control the sensitivity of the digital sensor or technically speaking controlling the post-image gain applied to the signal, but for all intents and purposes, we can think of it as sensitivity. It is part of the exposure triangle because when using an automatic or semi-automatic exposure mode the ISO setting influences the selected shutter speed or ...


6

The photos can be improved, but you would have to pay a retoucher and even then with such a high iso the photos are going to look poor. Maybe pick out a few worth paying a retoucher from the actual day and do a reshoot with someone that knows what they are doing. I spent maybe four minutes in lightroom working on this. Adjusting contrast, black levels, white ...


3

Certainly in terms of the example you've provided, I would suggest looking at how you can recrop images to minimise the impact. In the example image, recrop the photo to a landscape, with the heads near the top, so that you can eliminate the sky. Unfortunately, there's not much that you can do about the overall lack of composition; at the end of the day, a ...


3

Information that is not there is not there, there is no magic against that fact. What you can do is de-noise them in professional software (for example Lightroom). They will certainly look better (the obvious color noise would be gone), but they will never get get crisp and sharp like an ISO 100 shot. As others mentioned, there are other problems with the ...


1

I'm looking for my first DSLR and I want it to be sharp (I mean, 5DsR is really sharp but it has low dynamic range), has high dynamic range (like the D810) and has low iso noise. This contradicts following: Canon is the one and only brand I can consider, mostly because they lenses feels much more solid in the hand and they have nice wide-angle lenses. ...


1

I wouldn't exclude Nikon. I have a D750 and a 20mm 1.8 prime lens and I absolutely love it. You could also consider something like the A7 Mark II. It's what a lot of people are going for nowadays.



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