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by Lars Kotthoff

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23

Lightroom gives you a lot more control over the processing of your images. You can finely tune vignetting (add and remove), curves, sharpening, split-toning, adding clarity, removing chromatic aberrations, powerful noise reduction, de-warping (lens distortions and perspective) "selective editing" (e.g. change the saturation/luminance of one color only, or of ...


6

In addition to the answer @max provided, an important feature of Aperture and Lightroom offer, is non-destructive editing. Basically, Aperture and Lightroom never make changes to your original images, but store the steps made to achieve the changes. See it like a 'recipe' to produce the changes; Aperture and Lightroom apply that recipe 'real-time'. ...


6

You can do this fairly easily in Picasa. Simply select the Crop option, then "Add Custom Aspect Ratio" at the bottom of the crop options. This will allow you to select a custom size such as 8x8, then export export it as such. Below I have some screenshots to assist.


5

You have to do the imports. The systems need to set up all of their information about the images somehow, after all. So, start the imports and go do something else for a while. You're not required to sit and watch the imports. Let the computer do its thing, and then come back later when it's done.


4

Although storing your photos in folders is fast and simple, you can't place one photo into two folders without making file duplicates. And thus locating the necessary images might require more time. So economy in a stage of image library classification will leads in loosing time in finding images later.


4

You nailed it in your last question. The RAW file contains more information that the JPG does. This means that Aperture is (non-destructively!) going to be able to create better images, have multiple variations, and do so all non-destructively. If you need JPG files, have Aperture generate them for you with any size or quality you desire. If you have ...


3

In Aperture, at least, you can import photos into the database but leave the files where they are. In the Import settings (when you click on the "Import" button), choose Store Files: In their current location (instead of "In the Aperture Library").


3

If you are moving from iPhoto to Lightroom, you might need to get yourself accustomed to a simpler form of organization. Outside of faces, which is currently lacking in any automatic form (you can manually add tags for people or families and search by those), it is one of the top requested features for the next release of Lightroom. For the rest, such as ...


3

I had the same problem. In Aperture, choose the Window -> Show Keywords HUD menu item. Click on the "iPhoto Original" keyword, and press the delete icon. You can do this with all other objectionable keywords. Incidentally, Aperture allows you to have multiple libraries. Look under the File menu.


3

this is my first time posting, I was looking for the answer to this very question, but seem to have found a very easy way to do just what you are looking for, at least for the "iPhoto original" tag. in your inspector window, select the folder or section that has the photos with the troubled tag. then in that folder select all the photos for most efficiency ...


2

I haven't used these command line tools but they may be useful: http://www.sno.phy.queensu.ca/~phil/exiftool/ http://www.sentex.net/~mwandel/jhead/ And here is a listing of other EXIF manipulation tools: http://graphicssoft.about.com/od/exifsoftware/EXIF_IPTC_XMP_Software_Metadata_Readers_Editors_Extraction_Tools.htm Sorry for not being more helpful, ...


2

I would try Lightroom + Jeffrey's flickr plugin. It's a little more expensive, but it's the best tool for what you want.


2

Your problem (as I understand it) is that you have a square frame (say 6"x6") that you want to print for. Just having a square jpeg as @dpollitt isn't enough, because if you print it at A4 some of the image will not fit. OddPrints allows you to upload your photo and type in the size of your frame. You can then download a new jpeg ready for printing at a ...


2

If your plan is to keep the photos in albums on your iPhone, surely you should import and delete all photos from the Camera Roll and then rely on your workflow using iTunes and albums to put them back on the iPhone.


2

I am with you entirely. I hate having to do an import. I don't mind pointing an application at a folder that I have laid out. I can further sort within the app, add tagging, etc. But it had better not move my photos around. I don't know of any way to do what you want with iPhoto. Lightroom does indeed support a "folder" approach where that folder and ...


2

Windows Live Photo Gallery (WLPG) stores its metadata in XMP, or Extensible Metadata Platform. XMP is a standard way of storing image metadata, often called a "sidecar", and works with all forms of images including RAW. There is a good explanation of how WLPG stores their facial tagging records in XMP here. Given that its stored in XMP, it should be possible ...


2

If you backup the library without the new images you would lose all of the new working copies of the images. That is how referenced images in iPhoto works. I would recommend against doing anything but backing up the entire 20GB library file unless you want to lose your changes. A better option is really to attack the actual issue here. A single iPhoto ...


2

The way that iPhoto works is that unlike other photo managers (i.e., Adobe Bridge) is that iPhoto creates it's own unique library that is usually stored in your Pictures folder as a single file, where as other applications directly access the photos themselves in your User directory. When you import photos into iPhoto, it generally copies those photos into ...


1

It sounds like for your needs you may be better off with Picasa. The main advantages that Lightroom and Aperture give you is that you have more complex options for cataloging and keywording your files. This adds a lot of complexity to the system though, so unless you need the added functionality of Aperture or Lightroom, then it's probably not worth the ...


1

Sort of, it is possible to open different Libraries with iPhoto, but you can not merge libraries (you need to use Aperture for that). The trick is to hold down the Option key as you start iPhoto, this will give you a small window where you can create a new library or open an existing library. This let you switch between iPhoto/Aperture libraries. More ...


1

I cannot speak of iPhoto, because I have not used it much, but Lightroom (LR) does not require you to store multiple versions of images: in fact, one of the key principles in LR is that it does not touch the original image, but stores all changes/updates to an image in its own database. When loading an image another time, it then loads the original image and ...


1

From the Eye-Fi web site: Folder Management In the Eye-Fi Center software click the "settings" icon next to the Eye-Fi Card icon and choose "Photos" then under "Manage" choose "iPhoto" from the dropdown.


1

I typed the answer below without clearly reading your question. It might be useful to others. What I think you're looking for doesn't exist, but this appears to be close - phoshare. I know that out of the box the iPhoto library can be opened in Aperture.* That does give you some flexablity as you can switch between the two apps and the organization and ...


1

There is the ability to export directly to e-mail from Aperture. Try this: Choose File > Share > Email (or press Option-E).


1

I would definitely point Aperture to the iPhoto library. In fact, I'd ditch iPhoto altogether and just use OSX's Image Capture to import my photos.


1

I believe that all of the items you noted are stored in a proprietary format specific to iPhoto with one exception: location information can be exported. Exporting the location information should write the GPS data to the photo's metadata; Lightroom should then be able to read this data on import.


1

Looks like Photoshop Lightroom will do what I need it to do - HOWEVER, it doesn't support/import .PNG files, so unfortunately any iPhone screen-captures are ignored.



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