Time to be with your loved ones

Time to be with loved ones

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30

Firstly the iPhone 5 lens has to be f/2.2, due to the small pixel size, the effects of diffraction which start to creep in at f/11 on a DSLR, start to creep in at f/1.45 on a 5.6mm (diagonal) sensor! I though that in order to have a big aperture such as f/2.2 a big amount of light should be able to enter to the sensor and in order to do it, a big lens ...


25

The iPhone 4s alongside iOS5 makes a very compelling argument against a standard point and shoot camera in addition to a phone. The backside-illuminated CMOS sensor included in the iPhone 4s(iPhone) is the same sensor found in the Sony Ericsson Xperia Arc and the Xperia Neo. Both of these cameras have faired very well in low-light comparison tests. Recent ...


19

Composition is king. No matter what kind of camera you're using, all the usual composition techniques still apply. Sophisticated camera features won't save a poor composition, but a strong composition will shine through even when other aspects of the image aren't perfect. Work with the camera, not against it. Don't try too hard to impose your will on the ...


12

The iPhone 4 uses the Omnivision OV5650, and the 3GS uses either the OV3650 or a very similar model. The 3GS has a 1/4" sensor, which, using the bizarre industry standard, means a sensor diagonal of about 4mm. The OV3650 has an array measuring 3.626mm × 2.709mm, giving a diagonal of about 4.5mm, so that fits the spec. (Presumably some small portion of the ...


10

First, a few examples of what an iPhone 4 can take straight out of the camera, no manipulation or post processing done. Tips and tricks that helped me to get shots like these: Pay close attention to your horizons. With a small camera or cell phone it is easy to take a shot tilted from one side to another. Become familiar with the focal length of your ...


10

I own an Xperia Neo which one of the posters before listed as one of the phones with the same sensor as the iPhone 4S. Do I use the camera? A lot! But as always, if this "suffices" really depends on your requirements for a carry-everywhere camera. In the regard that you nearly always have it with you, the iPhone certainly wins. If you will be happy with ...


9

I would encourage you not to think of cell phone cameras as the lowest rung -- rather, they are the "best camera" (paraphrasing, among others, Chase Jarvis) because they are the ones you most often have with you. Some photographers like Jay Meisel are disciplined enough to take their cameras everywhere -- even out to the corner drugstore. Not so for most of ...


8

Almost certainly those LEDs are flickering. There are valid reasons why LED displays are designed so that only some of the LEDs are on at any one time, but I won't go into the electronics here. Apparently your shutter speed was faster then the total LED refresh interval, so the camera only caught some of the LEDs on. Use a slower shutter speed, like 1/50 ...


8

F values are relative to the focal length; the absolute aperture size of an f/2.2 lens is 1/2.2 times the focal length of the lens. Cellphone cameras have tiny sensors and thus large crop factors - their focal lengths are typically only a few millimeters. Even with a large relative aperture the absolute size of the aperture is only a millimeter or two.


7

Here's this device's basic problem: It's $250 for a device that is basically a gimmick. Aside from the initial humor of pairing your professional L glass with your decidedly not-professional cell phone camera, there's little to gain from this. The Pros Portability You'll be able to leave your pesky camera body behind! You know, that thing that weighs ...


7

Well, obviously its real. (It was even linked in our own chat). Without having used the device, the only real benefit here is probably increased 'optical zoom' from the ability to put larger lenses on the iPhone. You'll probably end up with quite the zoom range if you stick a longer lens on. Because you're probably taking a crop out of the intended image ...


6

I don't have the lens, but as some comments above say - their sample images are quite telling. Their very best pictures they chose to share as sample images are quite blurry and on a real camera would probably be tossed as unusable. (As best you can tell from their image sizes). They show using a tripod and thats going to be needed in the majority of ...


6

This feature is now built in to the new iPhone 5, and is also available on the iPhone 4S (if you have updated to iOS6). The same feature is also built into Android devices with the (little known) panoramic feature. Camera > Settings > Shooting Mode > Panorama Short video here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=txwdD11sW1s


6

There are two apps that are both seem to be well-liked that provide the pan/sweep functionality you desire. 360 Panorama (by Occipital - currently $1.99) Photosynth (by Microsoft - currently free) Both apps allow you to look at the phone's screen, pan/sweep the camera to record, and the app will stitch together a panoramic image based on the area you ...


6

EDIT: Regarding your edit. That is NOT HDMI output. What you are looking at is tethered shooting. It is available directly for Android here. For now on iOS, you need an intermediate computer to do the relay and this app. ORIGINAL ANSWER: If that DSLR is the Canon EOS 6D, you just need the Canon App (iOS and Android) and will be connected wirelessly. You ...


6

Any decent camera with some degree of macro capabilities will be a feasible slide/negative scanner, but, tthere are some other factors that incide a lot in the results. The first is an adequate backlighting device. Can be as complicated or as simple as you wish, as long as it allows you to get good exposure. I have tried different combinations of flash and ...


5

John Gruber of Daring Fireball put together an interesting set of comparison photos between The iPhone 4, 4s, and a Richoh GRD: http://www.flickr.com/photos/gruber/6236164321/in/set-72157627874743488/ Generally I think the iPhone 4s has crossed the point where most people could use it instead of a compact, but not as a replacement for a more "serious" ...


5

The Photographers's Ephemeris With this, you can pick a location on a map, and the app will show you the times of sunrise/sunset (and moon), including the times and a graphical indication of where the sun/moon will rise/set on the map, so you can plan shots. This has been a windows app that is now available on Androis and soon on iOS. This may be the one ...


5

For all intents and purposes, that would be 8-bits per channel or 24-bit per pixels because what you get out from the camera is a JPEG image and that is its limit. The sensor internally is highly likely to have a greater bit-depth, maybe 10 or 12 bits per channel. This is actually needed to produce an 8-bit-per-channel JPEG because sensor output is linear ...


4

The biggest issue I see with multiple exposure photos is that anything moving in the picture (or a shaky hand) will add aliasing/"ghost features" to the resulting photo. Depending on the algorithm (I have not tried the HDR feature), this may be more or less prominent. For example, a bird flying through the photo could, with a clever algorithm, be cancelled ...


4

Check out the GorillaMobile. It is very small and light and its flexible legs let you attach it to various objects such as poles, street signs, tree branched, bicycle handles, etc. EDIT: Gary Fong now makes a tripod adapter for the iPhone, meaning you can use your iPhone on any tripod. Plus, the iPhone is so light compared to a camera that any ...


4

This is a great question since the best camera is the one you have with you... and no one leaves home without their cellphone. Limitations There are a few reasons why cellphones aren't good cameras. Sensor size: There is a lot of items packed into the camera. The sensor needs to be able to distinguish one thing from the other, and the less space it has ...


4

I know with the 430ex II I can set it to manual and wireless and the flash from the camera will trigger the speedlite. Just give it a shot. Here's a video where one of the cheapest cameras was used with a 430ex II: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zh6zr3wKRV0


4

You need to be at the perfect latitude(65-72deg), on a crisp, cold, clear, and cloudless night, with zero light pollution, and a huge amount of luck. Even then you are pushing it with equipment like that. See the Auroa-Borealis tag here for much more info - http://photo.stackexchange.com/questions/tagged/aurora-borealis


4

Absolutely. There is a great dongle+app, offered by TriggerTrap. I purchased it and I'm supper happy with it. If I recall correctly, the app is available for iOS and Android. EDIT: Some of the free app's options are as follows: Simple cable release Press and hold Press and lock Timed release Timelapse TimeWarp (time lapse + acceleration) DistnaceLapse ...


4

I'm not aware of any one-click utility for this, nor anything that can run off a video stream directly, but if you were to export the individual frames to images first, there's a bunch of ways to get averages (either median or mean) from a stack of images. You'd most likely be looking at selecting each stack one-by-one and averaging into single frames, then ...


4

You could try using Registax. Generally, Registax is used for astrophotography, particularly of the planets in our solar system. Registax uses the concept of superresolution to stack hundreds or thousands of frames, discard the worst, keep the best, then interpolate the information from all of those frames in such a way that it enhances detail and ...


3

Part of learning about photography is learning to recognize and exploit the strengths and weaknesses of different cameras. The iPhone camera is very good for a phone, but telephoto shots are not its strength, and never will be. No accessory is going to change that. I have three specific recommendations for you. Use shoe-leather zoom: move closer to your ...


3

Quality / file size If the camera saves the image in a format with a greater bit depth, the files will be larger. If it on the other hand saves it in the same format as regular images, the image quality will suffer in some conditions, as it has to squeeze a larger dynamic range into the same number of bits.



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