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22

"Colour" is essentially a property of the distribution of wavelengths of visible light (as perceived by humans). Digital cameras only detect the amount of light at each pixel, they can't measure the wavelength and thus can't record colours directly. Colour images are produced by placing alternating red/green/blue filters in front of each pixel. By placing a ...


17

that purple haze is probably a color cast caused by the glass itself; the welders glass often isn't neutral color. you should be looking at solar filters, or very dark (and probably stacked) ND filters. Thousand Oaks sells solar filters, to name one company.


15

The image we can see from an infrared camera is what is known as a false color image. What this means is that a range of wavelengths in the infrared spectrum are rendered with a corresponding wavelength of visible light. Just as with visible light, a particular wavelength of infrared light can vary in intensity from just above black (shadows) to near ...


13

Yes, but not on most standard DSLRs. Most digital cameras have an infrared filter on the sensor to improve the image captures in the visible spectrum. In order to do take infrared photos it is best to buy a camera designed for that purpose or modify a camera by removing the filter on the sensor. There is a great overview of digital infrared photography ...


13

Lenses certainly are not optimised for the infra-red spectrum. I know this from pursuing infra-red photography with a converted camera. Chromatic aberration (well wavelength specific aberration, infrared light has no colour) is much worse, resolution is lower and some lenses exhibit "hot spots" a curious type of flair that occurs in the centre of the image. ...


10

IR light is not bent quite like visible light when it passes through the lenses. This is why you need a separate IR focusing mark in the first place. You have one IR mark for shooting at 24mm, one for 35mm and one for 50mm on this lens. Obviously, IR does not bend consistently at the various focal lengths of the lens either. Neither, strictly speaking, does ...


10

To an extent yes your camera can support IR photography. It has an IR filter but if you mount a visible light blocking filter on the lens and use a long enough exposure you can record images in infra red. Alternatively you can have the IR filter on the sensor replaced with a visible light blocking filter and shoot images handheld without anything on the ...


10

I've done my own conversion on a Nikon D80, including cutting my own rectangular filter from a hoya 720 nm 77 mm round filter. I did something a bit unusual and went so far as to remove the IR filter from the AF sensor module and meters, as well as the CCD itself. Really, The pure CCD filter swap is pretty easy. Pulling the filter on the metering sensor ...


9

Well, I haven't personally, but the folks over at Life Pixel have. In summary: 830nm - Deep blacks. Very contrasty in B&W. Hoya R72/Wratten 89b /720nm - The most 'common' choice. Good all-around tone range, but less saturated than a 665nm filter. 665nm - More saturation and color range. B&W will be less contrasty than the 720nm. 590nm - Vibrant, ...


8

It's possible to remove the CFA (colour filter array) but extremely difficult. There is at least one company that will do it (Maxmax as asalamon74 states). Doing this is entirely unneccesary for IR conversion, in fact one of the things I like about IR photography is playing with the faint colours that result, which requires the CFA. As to why you'd want to ...


8

The Sigma DSLR cameras do straight IR work without long exposures or altering the sensor - all you have to do is remove the dust protector (which takes a moment and requires no tools, and is easy to put back). At that point you can do what is called a full-color IR where you capture the other portions of the spectrum but extend into IR, or you can use an ...


8

I had a Rebel XSi converted by ProTech in the UK, and could recommend their services. I went for a 720nm IR pass filter so I don't need anything on the lens. I'd recommend this wavelength for your first IR camera as you can produce both colour and contrasty B&W images: It's not that difficult a procedure actually, Lifepixel sell kits for people to ...


8

Because of the 60Da's modification to increase IR sensitivity for astrophotography, if you plan on using the camera for regular visible-light photography, you probably should get an IR cut filter, otherwise you may experience color shifts when the sensor gathers both visible and non-visible light together (magenta cast with synthetic fabrics, and foliage ...


8

This is just the diffused light going through the welder glass. It comes from two sources: the sky and the two welder glass. (These have coplanar surfaces that allows for bouncing the light for long.) You cannot do anything with those either. You need to use optical quality filters (ND filters of high value) to achieve this effect, although then you will ...


7

You basically have three options: Hot mirror in front of sensor (e.g. stock camera) Only good for visible light, IR exposures are possible with a lens-mounted IR filter, but exposure times are on the order of minutes. Cold Mirror (e.g. IR Only filter on sensor) - Camera is only good for IR Photography. If you have this professionally done, (or are ...


6

If you remove the IR-blocking filter and do not replace it with anything, you will be removing a section of glass from the optical system. As a result, your viewfinder and auto-focus will be out of calibration; removal of refracting glass makes the light path between lens and sensor slightly longer and as a result some lenses will not focus to infinity on ...


6

Yes, infrared photography does record infrared wavelengths. Usually, a filter is used to make sure no visible light gets recorded. Sensors and films are not based on human eye, so their limitations are different. We can see the infrared light on resulting photographs because it is displayed in some other color(s) than infrared. In photography, colors in ...


5

I've had a camera converted, and some experience using IR filters with an unmodified camera. A converted camera is a real joy to use compared to using filters. The ability to see through the viewfinder and snap away handheld is worth it compared to 30s exposures with a tripod. Live view is really good with IR converted cameras, not only for dead on ...


5

I would go for the 720 nm, any longer (800s and you're limited to pure black and white - i.e. you get no colour response. Any shorter (500-600) and you start to lose some of the IR look, that is to say the very dark skies and glowing vegetation. A 720nm filter is a good choice for a first IR camera as you can get the look of any of the other filters (with a ...


5

These spots are clearly some point-like IR light sources out of focus (When I said sources it may also be some reflecting stuff). You may check that changing the f-number will change the size of the spots. You can see from the left part of the image that some of the spots are in front of the wood wall so they do not originate from the sky. One can conclude ...


5

Why do DSLRs not use infrared instead? If you used an infrared sensor to focus the lens, the image would be out of focus in the visible spectrum. The refractive index of a lens depends in part on the wavelength -- that's why a triangular prism breaks white light up into its component colors, and it's also the cause of chromatic aberration. Lens ...


4

The best way to shoot IR is with a modified camera, that way you are free to handhold your shots, compose through the viewfinder and focus with AF/liveview. However this requires the infraref filter to be removed and replaced with a visible light blocking filter. You are looking at $300 or so for the conversion, and it's permanent. However there is a very ...


4

My Orbit will. Even has Zeiss glass and pan, tilt, and zoom. Timelapse example here.


4

I can put in a good word for LifePixel. I converted my Canon 20D about 18 months ago now... I actually did the conversion myself and I can attest to the quality of the tutorials they provide. Walked me through every step of the way and I had no issues whatsoever. Of course if you're not into DIY monkeying with your camera, they'll do the conversion for ...


3

I've used maxmax.com for a 5D and it came out great, no complaints. I've heard of lifepixel.com as well but haven't personally used them, their website certainly looks better :)


3

You can achieve a similar effect without modding your camera by buying a Near-IR filter. These usually stop you waaaay down, so your exposure is 25–30 seconds, and you can't see anything through the viewfinder. Requires manual focus too. After taking the capture, you have to post-process the image — I forgot the details but it involved switching reds with ...


3

http://www.dpfwiw.com/ir.htm might give you some information about it. It seems possible on some (not all) cameras. The site looks pretty comprehensive to me.


3

If you remove the color filter array then (theoretically) you'll have a B&W DSLR. Removing the filter is quite complicated, there are a few companies offering DSLR B&W conversion like maxmax. Check their webpage they have quite good sample photos.


3

In my opinion by far the best way to do IR photography is to have the IR blocking filter removed from the sensor and a visible light blocking filter installed. If you leave the sensor filterless, so it sees all wavelengths then you will always need a filter on your lens which will cause problems with AF and obstruct your view from the viewfinder. If you do ...



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