Alley in Pisa, Italy

by Lars Kotthoff

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18

Yes. You can do things with a wide angle that can't be done with photo stitching. This photograph could not have been stitched; whilst I had time to take a few shots, I would never have had the chance to stitch it together. Also the wide angle has a distortion effect, and this can be used for its specific composition effect and to draw attention to ...


17

What you are thinking of is seam carving. The example you are thinking of comes from the Wikipedia article of the same name. Photoshop implements this and calls it "Content-aware scaling" and the GIMP calls it "Liquid Rescale".


12

What you are trying to construct is a parallel motion panorama. Its been on my TODO List to do so far a while but I have not done it myself yet. Microsoft ICE supports this. It is the only software which I know of to do automatic stitching of parallel motion panoramas. You will find that option under 'Camera Motion' below and to the left of the preview ...


11

If there is anything moving in the shot, then there isn't a substitute for a good wide angle lens. In addition, the difference in angle of the lens is going to result in a characteristically different feel from multiple shots at a longer focal length than a wide angle lens would have given on it's own unless you use a specially built mount that can rotate ...


11

Great question. A little over a year ago, I bought an ultra-wide (10-24mm f/3.5) lens with an eye toward landscape shots and quickly saw that generally, I can stitch images taken on a longer lens and produce more satisfactory panoramas. So, as you ask, what's the point of an ultra-wide? Well, to answer it, the best approach is probably to discuss what an ...


8

When you shoot a panorama by only rotating the camera then you're simulating the effect of a wider field of view lens (even if you use a non-standard projection). If you move the camera then what you're trying to produce has no equivialent in reality, i.e. its not a 2D projection of a 3D scene like most photographs, it's something else all together! Because ...


6

For distant scenery, you are right you can stitch. Problems: the time to process multiple images. Instead of 50 wide angle shots, you have 150 to stitch together. You'll end up with larger files, so more pixels to work with, but bigger files. Ghosting - clouds, tree limbs, or people are moving may make seams problematic Foreground interest. Most good WA ...


6

There are several key phrases for software which does this automatically: "seam carving" — the basic technique for automatically dividing up an image based on features in the image; "content aware", as in "content aware fill", "content aware scale", and "content aware move" — software features which use seam carving in image manipulation "liquid", as in ...


5

Sounds like stitching, but it could be accomplished through a few different types of compositing as well. For the guy, you could simply extract him as a layer and composite him back in to the image. So either stitching (which would be blending the two parts of the image together, or compositing, which would be separating to layers and then using the layers ...


4

Your problem consists of two parts. Star trail stitching First you want to combine the photos of each camera separately into star trail images. Your result will be a star trail image from the 7D and one image from the XTi. This answer has more details on astrophotography. The relevant part is under the heading Capturing Star Trails. For the stacking you ...


4

It seems that this is what the template feature is for. How can I reuse a project as a template? If you copy a .pto project to a different folder and open it with hugin, you will be prompted for the 'missing' images. You should delete any control points from this template project since they won't be relevant to the new photos. Alternatively you can ...


4

Stitching is not mathematically correct. It is a 2D technique that works with image data. It simply warps the pictures to make them overlap without regard for perspective. Therefore it is confounded by perspective shifts when the camera view is rotated. For instance, lines which appear parallel when facing in one direction might converge in when the view ...


3

Hugin can do this. The only tricky part is that you need to choose the correct optimizer setting ("positions and translation") to tell Hugin that your camera has moved between shots. Here are a couple of tutorials for using Hugin like this: Stitching murals using mosaic mode by Terry Duell Stitching flat scanned images by Bruno Postle Linear Panoramas ...


3

The command line you typed for celeste should work. What I would look into next is: Confirm that the file celeste.model is in the same folder as celeste_standalone.exe Look from what path you are calling it, and possibly adding the hugin\bin folder in the path for your command line 'SET PATH=%PATH%;c:\huginFolder\bin' Having it in the bin saved me from ...


2

Canon's PhotoStitch has two stitching modes - Panning and Parallel. It even factors in the focal length your frames were captured with. If you shoot with a Canon, you should have the software in the Canon Utilities disk. Whatever software you use, however, try shooting with the longest focal length to eliminate geometry distortions. It becomes a tradeoff ...


2

I'm not sure this is a perfect solution, but I'd give Hugin a try. One of the features I love about Hugin is the ability to define straight lines that extend across photos. This gives the software an extra clue about what should end up looking straight once the panorama is assembled. I've never tried making a horizontal movement panorama like this, but ...


2

Looking at the last result, I think that's as good as you'll get modifying each set, so I would do as you suggest and use a radial gradient. To select grey to white, rather than black to white, set your foreground/background colors to grey and white before selecting the gradient tool. Or you can use black/white, set blending mode to overlay and use layer ...


2

How can I compute which solution is the best, depending on the angle between the two cameras, the focal length of the lenses, and the size of the cameras? It seems unlikely to matter which of the two setups you choose. Consider this: pick one of the configurations you describe above swap the positions of the two cameras, keeping the orientation of ...


2

Microsoft ICE (Image Composite Editor) is free (can be downloaded from here) and can perform the task you describe (and many more).


2

I do not know Autopano --- but Hugin has masks to correct this problems. Hugin is not the most user friendly app, but it's really powerful and has a lot of advanced options for stiching. And it's open source, and free. In your case, the trick is to use masks to tell the program that one part of the panorama has to come form just one image. There is a nice ...


1

If the overlap is always exactly the same and you want it disposed of in the same way, you could use ImageMagick, and specifically its montage subprogram. This is outlined in detail with great examples at ImageMagick v6 Examples -- Montage, Arrays of Images, and I won't duplicate that here. If things vary slightly from image to image and from run to run, ...


1

IMO, using Photoshop to manually stitch several photos together is probably going to be the most accurate, precise way of achieving this. Automatic photo stitchers aren't anywhere close to perfect, and though it will take a ton of time, manual Photoshopping is probably the best choice. Especially if the end result is for a professional sale.


1

This will be a game of trade offs. The first thing I would recommend is that mounting it on a wall may be easier than putting it on the floor since it may simplify lighting. Lighting the map clearly and evenly will be the most important aspect as it will be very noticeable in the end result if it isn't evenly lit. Using two or more strong, well diffused ...


1

Ideally the two cameras should cross at the nodal point of the lenses and form an X. Unfortunately, two objects can't occupy the same space at the same time. Whichever setup allows the nodal points of the lenses of each camera to be closest to each other will yield the best results. This will vary based on what camera and lenses you are using, but off hand I ...


1

As long as they are near each other, I don't believe it will matter. The area that each camera sees is going to be the same once you get past the first foot or so. If you think about it, the angle each camera is looking is the same in either case, only the side of each other that they are on changes. (If I'm understanding your setup correctly.) The real ...


1

There are two possible approaches to solving this problem: Searching overlapping images. (i.e. look at the content of images.) Using metadata (time between shots, further information). I would suggest that the second method can deliver results almost as good but much easier. I tend to shoot my images using AE and AF lock (on Nikon) which could be ...


1

Here is one I did by overlapping images that were shot going down the street. This was with photoshop using the measure tool and "Rotate Canvas" Arbitrary to get the verticals straight and parallel. Then the images were cropped, merged and erased the non aligning overlapping parts of the images. It is time consuming and is not the software answer you want, ...



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