Time to be with your loved ones

Time to be with loved ones

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37

Advantages of having stabilisation in the camera: Works for all lenses The lenses gets cheaper Advantages of having stabilisation in the lens: The camera gets cheaper and can be built smaller The stabilisation can be specially made to fit the lens characteristics Works also with older camera models


36

Increase your ISO as far as you can go without losing too much quality (to get a shutter speed as close as possible to the 1/focal length rule). Practice and use a stable shooting position like one of these to help steady the camera: http://blog.muddyboots.org/2009/04/avoiding-blur-due-to-camera-shake.html Slowly and smoothly press the shutter button, don't ...


31

In lens stabilisation contains a servo activated rear element which acts to move the image projected by the lens in order to cancel out the camera shake. In body stabilisation moves the sensor in order to counter camera shake. No method is clearly better, and discussion tends to turn into a brand war as Canon and Nikon don't offer (and are not likely to ...


30

As of today there are 38 prime lenses with image stabilization. Almost half (16) of them are from Canon and 2 are Canon-mount Sigma (data from these search results at NeoCamera). What you will notice is this is less common in the wide focal-length, with the only wide-angle stabilized lenses being Canon's 24mm, 28mm and 35mm, (all others below 100mm are ...


25

You have gyroscopes and electronincs which detect camera shake, and then move parts of lens (in case of IS lens) to compensate the movement of camera. In-camera stabilization moves whole sensor. Illustration of in-lens IS from Canon description page:


22

General Rule The general rule of thumb for 35mm (full frame) has been the reciprocal of the focal length. This means that for a 50mm lens, the minimum shutter speed when hand-holding is 1/50 sec. 1/(focal length) = 1/50 Since this is usually not an option, 1/60 sec is the next option. Since the move to digital and multiple sensor sizes, the generally ...


22

Unlikely to be Image Stabilisation @Dan, that's a good question. I suspect that most of us have a problem with blurry images more often that we would like. It's unlikely that Image Stabilisation is causing this problem. I have certainly never had this problem myself. However, IS reduces camera shake - that probably isn't your problem. So, what could ...


21

I conducted a large number of accurate measurements on a 50 mm lens on a Pentax K7. The bottom line, Shake reduction/VR/IS (call it what you will) is very beneficial. A link to the full study is on www.scribd.com (pdf) The graph below shows the main results. Motion blur, in pixels, was used as a measure of image stabilisation. The tests show that motion blur ...


17

Image stabilization aims to fix the problem of a moving camera (camera shake). Your question and example photo aim to fix the problem of a moving subject. To reduce blur of a moving subject, you need a shorter shutter speed, or you need to freeze the motion with flash. If you also have camera shake, then image stabilization will help some. But first make ...


16

Aligning can be done for example with stitching-programs like Hugin. add all you pictures to the hugin-project let the pictures be analyzed/matched by "align image stack" (Images - Tab: Feature-Matching) add some points if needed (Control Points - Tab) set optimization to Position and Translation at the most (Optimiser-Tab) Optimize (Optimiser-Tab) check ...


16

I don't know how it works with this lens, but I've seen charts for Pentax's in-body stabilization system where the data shows that contrary to conventional wisdom I.S. gives a (decreasing but still there) benefit up until rather high shutter speeds, at which point it doesn't matter (and doesn't make things worse). If you have the camera on a very steady ...


16

the only time the IS elements are "moving" is during the focus process (when you have your finger on the shutter button and a couple seconds after) otherwise everything is locked in place. If this weren't true then moving the lens and camera with IS turned on would have the potential to damage the elements of the lens and that would defeat the purpose of the ...


16

Prime lenses with image stabilization do exist, and I believe they will become more popular with time. One great example of the implementation is the Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L IS USM. It provides 4 stop hybrid image stabilization, great for angular as well as shift movement. A 50mm prime will not benefit nearly as much as a 50mm, especially when you start ...


15

The Wikipedia article on Image Stabilization has quite a bit of information. Below are some of the relevant sections. For in lens stabilization: In Nikon and Canon's implementation, it works by using a floating lens element that is moved orthogonally to the optical axis of the lens using electromagnets. Vibration is detected using two piezoelectric ...


15

Using lenses with IS can take a little practice to get used to and use effectively. There are times when IS/VR may actually add blur to your images, due to the way it functions. Generally, if you are using a lens with image stabilization, you need to make sure that IS is active and tracking before you fully press the shutter button. If you make the mistake ...


14

You can determine the minimum shutter speed to avoid camera shake by 1) applying the following approximate rules of thumb. (See Wikipedia article - rule of thumb) 2) or carrying out careful measurements, as I did. 1) The rules of thumb a) With NO image stabilisation The approximate rules of thumb are: Full frame cameras : min shutter speed = ...


14

Okay, mine is not a technical answer, but I think it has some merit that the technical answers lack: empiricism. Try using different speeds and see what you can hand-hold. For each lens (and zoom setting, if applicable), handhold the camera while on shutter priority,and see what the slowest shutter speed YOU can use is without shaking the camera. Different ...


14

The rule of thumb is you can hand hold a 50mm lens at 1/50th second, or a 100mm at 1/100th second and have reasonable lack of camera shake. VR extends that a few stops. So it depends on the amount of light. In bright sunlight, at f/16 and a 35mm lens, you wouldn't need a tripod or VR. In low light, VR won't be enough, you'll need a tripod In between ...


13

It is indeed a rule that comes from film cameras. On point 4 the answer is simple: Multiply the focal length with the crop factor of your sensor. Because the sensor is smaller than a full frame sensor, it will not cover the full image circle, cropping out a smaller image. This has the effect of looking like a longer focal length. E.g. on Canon, a 50mm ...


12

It's unlikely to be IS. If it is, then IS is seriously broken. It's generally safe to leave it on all the time except when you are using a (very firm) tripod. That said, with a moving child from close range, IS really isn't likely to have much of an effect. What it could be, from most to least likely: Subject moving in and out of focus. By the time ...


12

This looks to me like it might be dust spots or speckles on the lens, which are getting highlighted by the reflection of the flash back onto the surface of the lens. Obvious first step: try cleaning the lens with lens cleaning fluid / wipes. If this doesn't work, we might need more information. You mention this happens when using the flash with the Digital ...


12

No. Tripod sensing is based on vibration measurements. While it might seem logical that a camera could sense if something is attached to the tripod socket, they do not do that. The reason you state is enough since quick release plates often stay attached. Other accessories attach to the tripod socket such as flash brackets, camera slings, etc and would ...


11

One thing I've heard of people doing is improvising a tripod using a length of string - the idea being that you can tie it to the D ring on an existing tripod plate, and then use the string in tension, for example by looping it under your foot for a string monopod, or tying off to a railing or post to add an extra degree of stability. There are other simple ...


11

I was long a user of monopods out in the field. With the advent of image stabilization lenses, I find I almost never haul it out any more. About the only use case I have for it now is when I'm using my 300/1.4x combo with waterbirds or shorebirds, and even then, I'm most likely to either carry the tripod or go handheld. I see the use case for monopods in ...


11

There are two main reason why there's little chance we're going to see 50mm IS lens in the near future: 50mm lenses tend to be very simple and therefore cheap. Complicating its design with an image stabilizer group would push the price significantly higher, while the added benefit of IS wouldn't be that high at 50mm focal length. If you want an expensive ...


11

I very much doubt you can damage the lens in this way, the glass that the IS system moves is designed to be very light so as to have low inertial stiffness so it can move quickly and accurately. This same trait means it should be able to move against any momentum you put into the lens. Empirically having seen the way some people abuse their super-teles (300 ...


11

Well if you're just talking about motion blur from your handheld shakiness - pretty much all the modern IS/VR/OS designs handle 1-stop differences pretty well. 1/30th at 105mm might be pushing it, but most current IS designs handle a two stop difference well, especially if you're a somewhat steady person. At the claims of 3-4 stops is really where things ...


11

In addition to MikeW's answer, I would suggest a few other benefits that tripods provide for landscape photography. Often with landscape photography there is the desire to compose an image exactly and then wait for the light to be "right". With a tripod it's possible to set up in advance, and then wait for the sun to rise or set or for that shaft of light ...


11

I did some quick Google Books searches, and while I can't pinpoint the origin, there are a number of references to it as a rule of thumb or general guideline in the early 1970s, and none that I can find before that. There are plenty of earlier references to the idea that a longer focal length requires a faster shutter but they're all general advice. The ...


11

No Canon dSLR has built in image stabilization. Canon offers it in select lenses, known as 'IS' lenses. So, no, neither offer image stabilization. All Canon cameras also offer noise reduction, and of course, it can be applied (or not in the case of RAW) on the computer after the fact as well. Does it matter? Noise reduction matters, because all cameras ...



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