Time to be with your loved ones

Time to be with loved ones

by sat

submit your photo


Hall of Fame
View past winners from this year

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

36

A technically correct photo should: be sharp rather than blurry be focused properly rather than on some random AF point be properly exposed have correct color balance not have too much noise


25

For start, one should be aware that technical correctness is no substitute for artistic vision. Here are some technical criteria in no particular order: The exposure is correct, shadows are not lost, highlights are not clipped The parts that need to be in focus, are in focus There is no motion blur (caused by camera shake) The photo does not have a color ...


14

Apparently you have the Highlight Alert feature on. This allows you to preview areas of your picture that are overexposed (receiving too much light) and decide if this is your intention or not. This is a very handy feature, but if you prefer to turn it off you can follow this tutorial (source): Press the Menu button, then use the Multi-selector to ...


8

The ISO standard, as explained in this document produced by X-Rite, a company that produces hardware and software used for color calibration, is to view prints in light that is at D50 (full spectrum centered at 5,000K) in terms of color temperature. In terms of intensity, around 2,000 lux (roughly equivalent to an overcast day) should be used for color ...


7

Things look different because everything is different and you have done no effort to make them the same. Your DSLR has control over brightness and so does your screen and your friend's, etc. The probability of them being at the same brightness without you doing explicitly so is absolutely zero. A JPEG image and RAW file is different. As a matter, a RAW ...


6

I am certain there are no such generally-accepted criteria, because there are too many variable factors. Even technical aspects of image quality are subjective, and one person's "too much blur" may be another's "sense of motion". I'm sure many specific contests have their own scoring systems and scoring rules, to help with consistency across years and ...


5

It depends on the camera, but generally the JPEG is shown and the histograms correspond to the JPEG as well. RAW isn't actually an image file, it is sensor data. Without further image processing it can't be displayed as a particularly meaningful image since it would lack color information and would not be true black and white either due to color filters on ...


5

I had a sun shade on my D100 years ago... that lasted exactly one shoot. I'd look into the HoodLoupe. I have a couple. Great product. They're made by Hoodman Corporation — http://hoodmanusa.com/.


4

If you want to see the white balance setting, then in the playback menu, find the playback display options and enable "shooting data" which will include aperture, shutter speed, white balance and other settings. The playback display options also include an option to show the RGB histogram, if that's what you mean. Once enabled, you can cycle through the ...


4

You are almost certainly seeing a JPEG preview file. Even if you only save RAW files, the vast majority of cameras generate a preview or thumbnail JPEG and that is what you see on the LCD on the back of your camera. RAW files contain monochromatic luminance values for each photosite. Since the sensor is masked with a pattern of filters that allow different ...


4

The most likely reason is the relative brightness of your camera LCD and your computer screen. I wouldn't judge if the image is bright just because it looks bright in the LCD. I would instead use the histogram - start by taking a well-exposed image where you have a histogram that indicates the image is not too dark and not too bright. I would turn off ...


3

The fastest viewer for Windows is PMView Pro as far as I can tell. You can download a free trial for 30 days (IIRC) and the full version is not expensive ($50 USD). This may depend on your hardware but is one of the most efficient software at reading images. I bought several licenses over the years and although I use Linux primarily, I still use it often ...


3

I have 2 D3200s and one of the first things I noticed was that at default "0" screen setting they are both way too bright. I'm a 40 yr vet to photography and it absolutely is a defect in the screen brightness. I own D3100, D5100, D700, D7000, D200 and others and have never had the problem with any other camera.


3

Well, Canon 20D doesn't have live view and that makes it a little hard but I guess it shouldn't be that hard to hook a bigger monitor to it. I just looked up the B&H quickly and I found this portable monitor which has analog inputs: Vello RigVision 9" HD Camera Monitor It has many different inputs and I guess you should be able to connect to your ...


2

Your DSLR has an optical viewfinder (thank god...) rather than EVF like in those compacts, so no - you did not miss such settings. That said, you do have a brightness settings on your menu to enhance the rear LCD. Might not help in full sun, but can make the difference in less demanding situations. Note that it eats your camera's battery faster, though. In ...


2

You can buy shades which clip on on to the LCD and flip out. However, if like me you don't mind looking slightly odd if it saves you money, you can just keep the inner cardboard tube from a toilet paper roll in your kit, then you can just put it against the LCD and look through the other end. Works a treat.


2

The essentials of a "Technically Correct" image would be: Sharp Correct Exposure Correct Focus (Auto-focus should take care of this) For the most part, if you use good equipment in auto mode and avoid things like camera shake, your camera will take care of the technically correct part. As long as you know how to avoid the big issues, you can take a ...


2

It seems like there are a number of smartphone and tablet options (none of which I've needed to try personally, but they may give you some ideas): use an iPad with a CF card adapter use a SD to CF adapter in your camera to record images onto SD cards instead of CF; you can then use the iPad Camera Connection Kit to read images from the SD card on your iPad ...


2

The EPSON P3000 is probably what you are looking for. It also does backups too as a bonus. It has a 4" LCD and can show both JPEG and RAW images from a Compact-Flash card. You can zoom into images to check focus. Just note that because it is hard-drive based, it does not work above 10,000' of altitude which can be a concern for some and irrelevant for ...


1

RAW is a data format. It is not an image. Anything you see in the preview is an image. If you shoot JPEG, the choice is obvious. If you shoot RAW. what you see is the data transformed into an image by the camera processor and stored for convenience as an embedded JPEG in the file. As for your question, you see, it does not matter. Whichever one is being ...


1

As already answered, it depends of the camera (I know mine is using the jpg because if I shoot in raw only, the preview isn't available). If you really want to know, you may test it easily: take two easy to tell apart picture (ie one of the sky and one of the ground) transfer the jpg files to your computer rename each of them with the name of the other ...


1

It is really an artistic choice. The standard environment for lab color is as Michael Clark described, but display of a print and the gallery conditions can also be altered to whatever conditions you think best fit the print. Paper selection, light color or colors, framing and matte options, angle of display, size of display, printing technique, color, ...


1

Your camera is probably doing fine. If the RAW looks as good as the JPEG when you brighten it up, then everything is fine. You can use exposure compensation to get more information into the RAW. Set the JPEG picture settings to neutral to get a true representation of the data you are capturing. Vibrant looks nicer on the camera but does not give you a real ...


1

I use the star ratings in Adobe to help me figure out my keepers. As such, it depends on the shoot and the purpose. What I do is go through quickly and give a star to technically correct and aesthetically pleasing photos. If I have botched a camera setting, I really don't care about much else. The photo doesn't make it to the next round. Recycle those ...


1

you can use something like this - costs only 12 USD. But I mostly use my baseball cap, to shade the screen.


1

This is a very common problem. No LCD will be bright enough to compete with the sun and the glare off the front of the screen. There are a large number of LCD shades available, which mitigate the problem by allowing you to view the image in a darkened environment. I haven't tried any of these. Other than the added bulk, they look like a good solution.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible