Butterfly

by Rodrigo

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0

The short answer is both, but it requires some explanation. Megapixels. Yes, but only if we're talking about 12MP vs 24MP for a given sensor size. The issue is not the absolute number of megapixels per se, but the size of each individual pixel. Buckets in the rain is the common analogy used. Essentially, if you have two buckets out in the rain, the bigger ...


2

In both cases the blur will be reduced, it's just that in the second case you can see that effect more clearly from the powerspectrum in k-space. In general, when you are downscaling, you will not only reduce the blur, you will also lose small details (because you keep the pixel size the same, anything that becomes smaller than one pixel will vanish from ...


0

You aren't just downsizing your image, you're wanting to change the aspect ratio from 4:3 to 8:5, and if you've listed the dimensions consistently, you want to scale a portrait orientation image to landscape as well. Neither of those things is going to work without cropping your image. Or adding to the image by adding a border or using something like ...


1

The difference is a higher reliability and compliance to different (industry) standards. Say for example you are building automated assembly lines for other companies that at some point require computer vision. If this assembly line fails and stops doing whatever it is supposed to do, the company that bought it from you will charge you by the minute (and ...


3

Why can't you just use the sensor you have in a smartphone or in a simple hand-held camera with a microscope and get better quality more cheaply? You're starting from a false premise — that the resolution tells you much about the image quality. The $6000 camera from your link has a 1/1.2"-format sensor, which has an area roughly 5× that in an iPhone. ...


4

Have a DOG sniff out blur in the photos. If you're going to be penalizing for digitally enlarged photos, you might as well penalize for out-of-focus photos too. The blurred edges and details in both cause the same bad experience for viewers, regardless of whether it is caused by a small original or poor focus. What you want to do is detect blur, which is an ...


1

I do not that this is possible in the general sense. There are many possible upscaling algorithms, with a signature that may be difficult to detect unambiguously without knowledge of the image content (as an extreme example, an upscaled area of uniform colour is still uniform colour...). Possibly an option would be to calculate a metric for image ...


0

Your basic issue is that you expect viewing the image at 100% to look just as good as viewing it at more typical sizes. Your D90 has a resolution of 4288 X 2848 pixels. When zoomed in to 100% and viewed on a typical 96 dpi monitor, that equates to a total image size of 45" X 30"! Even an image shot in plenty of light at a very fast shutter speed from a ...


2

You took this photo indoors, without a flash, in low light. The camera selected a high(er) ISO then would be desirable especially when "pixel peeping" at 100% on screen. If you would post an image to a website that does not strip the EXIF info, I could tell you more about this, but as it is posted on Imgur I cannot tell you what ISO was selected. Another ...



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