Spring 2012

Spring 2012
by ani

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3

At a pixel level, you want to blur the lighter pixels horizontally, without blurring the picture as a whole too much. I took two times two similar steps in Adobe Photoshop to create the picture below. The first two steps: I selected the white colors using the "Select color range" tool, selecting an almost white picture and using a large range to select ...


0

Look in your printer settings and see if there is a selection to shake/vibrate the mirror, which will knock loose any accumulated dust from the mirror and sensor. Mine does it every time I turn it on.


4

By doing a quick edit using Fourier Transform as described in this Imagemagick tutorial I managed to considerable reduce the annoying effect when viewed at 100%. A more thorough edit using this method might provide better results, but the repeating pattern appears so often that some areas of the picture are basically left without any detail.


0

"Image Resizer for Windows" is a great free utility in less than 1MB for Windows users. All the images that are 5 MB or 10 MB can be cracked down to less than 200kb, with almost the same clarity. The problem is: these 10 MB images have a resolution of 4000 X 3000, but your phone or computer is only a 3rd of that, making it feel almost same. So unless you are ...


0

in windows i use a program called RIOT (Radical image optimization tool). Until now is the best i know of. http://luci.criosweb.ro/riot/


0

Given a resolution and quality level, there exist several other image file formats that can give the equivalent, but store the data more compactly than does the old standard JPEG. Some options include JPEG2000, identified by the .jp2 extension, is a somewhat older format that just never got popular. It uses wavelet transforms rather than jpeg's DCT (...


4

Does this make the lens better than an L Lens? It all depends on what way you mean when you use the word "better": Sharper at common apertures and focal lengths? At the center of the frame or over the entire field of view? Less chromatic aberration at a particular focal length and aperture? Less light falloff at a particular focal length and aperture? ...


2

Try to look at the histogram of the pictures. Is it unbalanced to the left? If so, you may be tricked by the preview screen. Also, could it be due to the screen you are using, which has poor contrast or low backlighting? Note that, typically, laptop screens don't have much contrast unless you set the backlight high or if exposed to sunlight.



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