Lunch atop a (Springfield) skyscraper

Lunch atop a (Springfield) skyscraper
by andy-m                

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0

Let's assume that both sensors have the same pixel count and that the crop factor equals the teleconverter magnification. Then in theory, the answer seems simple. Both do the exact same thing: simply use the centre portion of the image. The smaller sensor does it by placing the same number of pixels in the central image area. The teleconverter does it ...


0

It depends entirely upon the teleconverter in question, the lens in question, and the full frame and APS-C cameras in question. I've seen in-depth analysis that has gone one way with a particular camera/converter/lens combo and other comparisons with different cameras/converters/lenses that swung the other way. The same is true when comparing a full frame ...


0

It's difficult to be sure. The lens-camera system is a complex one. Making any changes to it can have unexpected consequences. Using a APS-C camera on a FF lens does throw away some of the useful light gathered. But interposing an alien lens cluster in the form of a focal reducer or teleconverter may or may not do more damage to the overall image quality. ...


4

This isn't just one company creating their own buzz, and corresponding buzzword, for marketing purposes. This has been an important advance in optics in general over the last 15-20 years. The technology is still in its early phases, where there is a lot of proprietary knowledge being closely held by the companies that develop this. I suspect it will be ...


9

The color temperature of your bulbs is not as important as you seem to think. What is important if you require fairly critical color accuracy is that, regardless of the temperature their output is centered on, your bulbs need to output most if not all of the full spectrum of visible light. In general for photographic purposes you want lights with a Color ...


-1

You don't need to shoot with "daylight" bulbs. Just match the camera white balance to match the light source. That WILL be the right temperature. If you shoot RAW is doesn't really matter at all because you can change it or fine tune it in post processing. I would suggest large wattage 5000K Compact Flourescent bulbs. A 45W CFL equals about 200W. They are ...


1

I'm going to agree with mattdm here. Facebook in particular is notorious for its brutal image compression. If you want it to look nicer on Facebook, or Flickr, you need to have lightroom scale down the image to whatever setting Facebook is trying to get it to. My suggestion is to use one of the export plugins, and then play with the settings to find one that ...


3

The mystery is simply that the low-resolution versions of photos on Flickr are downscaled and recompressed with whatever arbitrary settings Flickr chooses. If you download the original version, it's byte-for-byte identical to the one you provide via Google Drive — if that looks different, it's a problem with your viewing software. How can you avoid this? ...


0

Ionization, radiation, transistor wear, color filter aging and so on... In normal use you will never see anything weird except dead pixel count slowly rising that are not mapped out. The worst ones are those that are a little bit lighter/darker than the others. Hard to map them out if they are not exactly stuck. Since I am on the phone this link may be an ...


1

A factor not yet mentioned is changing expectations. When you buy a new camera you get the newest thing on the market: higher resolution sensor, better low light performance, better autofocus system, faster processor, and longer battery life than your previous camera. Over years of use your camera will experience wear and tear that might have a small impact ...


-1

Sensor signal to noise ratio gets worse over time and you will lose a little dynamic range, but you probably will never notice it on pictures.


0

It looks like the term losee is most likely a typo, but for what it is worth, here is the answer that I ended up discovering. The possible file formats were jpeg tiff psd dng And the answer was jpeg.


-2

As you know, digital images are a paint-by-numbers system. This is binary math using only two digits, the zero (0) and the one (1). The word digit is Latin for finger, and its root comes from the fact that we often count using our digits. The bottom line is: a digital image file can contain a googolplex of digits. How nice it would be if we could figure out ...


-3

"Lossy" refers to lossy compression. The most significant format using this is JPEG. Lossy compression is a slight misnomer. What actually happens in JPEG conversion is that the data is slightly modified to facilitate better compression. The actual compression of the modified data is not, itself, lossy ( typically it's Huffman encoding ). The ...


15

I'm 99.99% sure that this is just a typo for "lossy". I've never heard of the term "losee" and can't find it in search, either. Especially if it just appears in a review question and not in the rest of the text — it's probably just an error. A lossy format, of course, is one which discards (hopefully mostly imperceptible) information in order to achieve a ...



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