Moonlight

by Jakub

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1

White balance is a very straight forward image processing manipulation. It's just a per channel gain in linear RGB space. JPG files are sub-optimal for doing white balance as they usually have both a tone curve and an inverse monitor EOTF applied breaking the linear relationship with the scene luminance values. This is why it's usually done starting with ...


2

I had a great picture of a lady I took under weird, complex lighting (sodium vapor and mercury vapor lights). Great smile, perfect focus, excellent picture except for way, way off color. I monkeyed with temp/tint for an hour in adobe Camera Raw with no good result. I wrote a program to hack the sidecar XMP file varying the temperature and then creating a ...


2

I asked a while ago how to do that in Photoshop better. It has, in current versions, a depth-mapped dof lens-effect simulator, and an automatic "select what's in focus". A fully automated thing would do it the same way but punt on the depth mapping. A program for Android platform cameras has you move the camera up and over while it's looking, so it figures ...


2

The local contrast can be used to determine the region that is not in focus, and also you can determine by how a certain part of the picture is out of focus. One can then apply a blur that depends on the local contrast so that the more some region is out of focus, the more it will be blurred.


1

As far as I understand your question, it seems to me that the document mode from the interpolation options should solve your problem, see man dcraw: -d Show the raw data as a grayscale image with no interpolation. Good for photographing black-and-white documents. -D Same as -d, but with the original unscaled pixel values. -E Same as -D, ...


2

Lightrooms' sliders are weighted distributions. It is not as simple as "Whites" are 127-255, "Blacks" are 0-127. The distributions are weighted, and different sets of sliders affect different ranges in different ways. Whites affects a broad range, but obviously affects brighter tones with more weight than darker tones. Same with blacks, only it's the ...


2

From casual observation it would appear that each slider affects all values, however each slider affects each value to a different degree. From slightly more detailed observation: The Exposure slider affects the whole range with great effect The Black and White sliders affect he entire range, with a larger effect as you move towards the end of the scale ...


0

I would suggest you create an image with all 256 gray levels. Then you can move the sliders and see for yourself which values change. Your question of course assumes that these ranges are static and independent of the image in question, which might not be the case.


0

No, it won't. As modern DSLRs doesn't actually do analog binning, reducing resolution won't make up for the signal-to-noise ratio loss from underexposing. Underexposing When you underexpose one stop, the signal-to-noise ratio roughly halves. When the singal halves, the signal induced noise is reduced with the square root of that (ref), but the readout ...



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