Serene Life

by garik

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26

Exposure fusion is a process that takes multiple images and combines them to create a single image while only keeping the properly exposed elements. In contrast to HDR images, exposure fusion is more basic, gives a more realistic effect, and requires fewer steps. The exposure fusion(fusion, or EF) process takes each individual pixel and assigns a weight to ...


24

Darktable is starting to look quite impressive http://www.darktable.org/


23

Photoshop + Layers FTW. (yes, you can also use the Gimp, or any other editing software with the same functions.) Start with your base image, in the case above, I used the jpeg quality 100 image. create a new layer atop it paste the second image into that layer set the layer style to "difference" create an effect layer atop that set the effect to threshold ...


22

Color Management is a scientific process by which various devices used in an image processing workflow can be used despite differences in their supported color. Every device is only approximating some of the total range of colors humans can see, and this limited range is called its "color gamut". Each device has limitations, but those limitations differ from ...


21

Raw Therapee is getting to be quite nice, and was recently made open source. I've had success with building it myself, or just using the precompiled Windows version under WINE (with a bit of a slow down, but not bad). Raw Therapee is making its way into most popular distributions and can be installed via the system package manager. Be sure to check for it ...


17

The entire point of raw files is to save the full unprocessed output of the sensor, there are no programs that edit raw files because if you do any editing it's no longer the raw output and you are better off generating a TIFF from the raw and editing that. A note about resizing - most camera sensors have a pattern of red, green and blue pixels, where each ...


17

Check out Fro Knows Photo. There is a weekly RAW file you can edit and you can post your result on the forums (they are at edit 81 at the time of writing). Jared (the guy behind the site) then selects a handfull RAW edits from the forum and comments on them in a youtube video. As a plus, Jared and/or Adam will give a full tutorial (again youtube video) on ...


16

You can't resize RAW files per se. You can crop them in a RAW editor like Adobe Camera RAW, and the crop information will be stored in the sidecar XMP file, but the RAW file itself remains the same. This depends on your editor, but generally when you 'edit' a RAW file you are just storing settings in a 'sidecar' file. When you re-open the RAW file, the ...


15

IP-Slicer perl script can create slices which can stuck together into a ball. You can define the number of slices. The following command will create 12 slices, where the sphere circumference is 1500 pixels. sphere-slicer.pl 12 1500 sampleimage.jpg Sample input: Output (12 images):


13

The simple recipe is to convolve with a Laplacian of Gaussian kernel (3x3, with 8 in the middle surrounded by -1 and take the abs(result)) . After this you get some artifacts if it is a jpeg image, and out of focus borders that have a high intensity difference will also "ping". The result you can threshold to detect the strongest edges and remove teh ...


12

You can use any free (as in freedom) RAW processing software. I can recommend: UFRaw It is a stand-alone RAW converter. Its interface is different from many other RAW converters, but I find it quite good. It easily integrates with Gimp photo editor. RawTherapee It is more like workflow software rather than just a RAW converter. One may consider its ...


12

If you can process the RAW files, you'll have a bayer pixel array comprised of RGRGRG and GBGBGB rows (or possibly RGBGRGBG rows.) You could ignore all the R and B pixels, sum up the G pixels, take the square root (since there are twice as many green pixels as there are red or blue), and divide by half the number of G pixels. That should give you the proper ...


12

There's nothing wrong with your settings. On my monitor the clouds look fine, not blown out and the greens are nice and saturated. The most likely explanation is that your laptop screen is inferior i.e. it can't display the same range of colours or the same contrast as your desktop. In addition to that it's not calibrated either. You don't have to buy ...


11

Bibble Pro is a cross-platform program similar to Lightroom and Aperture. Great program, great plugins, great performance. As of early 2012, the product is discontinued, as the entire company was bought by Corel. Corel has announced a new program, AfterShot Pro, which is "based on Bibble's technologies", and which is also available for Linux, Mac, and ...


11

It's an interesting question. It's certainly possible for software to detect the parts of an image that is in focus, as it's the basis for focus-stacking software like Helicon Focus. Focus stacking is a technique used by macro photographers. The depth of field in many macro shots is very shallow, so to extend this it's possible to take a set of photos of ...


11

If you use Photoshop, here's how I'd do it: Put the two jpegs in the same psd file, in two separate layers. They should overlap exactly, since their dimensions are the same. (which one goes on top doesn't matter). Set the layer blending mode to "Difference." You'd see a mostly black result. Depends on the quality difference between the two original layers ...


11

I will only answer the first question: What are frequencies in images? Fourier Transform is a mathematical technique where the same image information is represented not for each pixel separately but rather for each frequency. Think about it this way. The sea has waves some of which are very slow moving (like tides), others are medium in size and still some ...


10

The Adobe Camera RAW/Lightroom white balance presets have too much magenta in them (for Nikon cameras, anyway). This can skew the overall color balance, but it can easily be gotten around by creating your own presets that leave the magenta/green balance at zero. The latest versions of the RAW engine and DNG spec support DNG profiles, which go a long way ...


10

LCD displays actually use several different technologies. You can choose TN (cheap, crappy), IPS (expensive, looks great), or VA (in the middle). If you can afford it, choose IPS. The most important advantage for photographers is that you don't get color shifts depending on viewing angle; IPS displays are also much easier to calibrate well. As a ...


10

I guess there isn't much more I could say other than I own the Apple CinemaDisplay 30" LCD screen, and I am a heavy duty Microsoft/.NET developer. I work entirely in Windows 7 on my custom-build PC (not a Mac), and this screen has been great. I purchased it quite a number of years ago, and it is still running strong. If I was in the market more recently, I ...


9

Lightroom 3 is pretty good lately.


9

I use digikam - it supports 300 RAW formats. You can see previews in the organise mode and edit RAW photos with the built in editor. The editor supports 16 bit colour depth and has enough features to support most amateurs. I think Raw Therapee might be a little better technically as a stand alone editor, but if you're not a pixel peeker then digikam makes ...


9

You could probably in most cases reconstruct an image that looks convincing, but you can't recreate what's actually seen from a point between the viewpoints. Take for example an image that is taken right in front of a wooden fence, where the two viewpoints are each in the middle of a panel so that they both only see the panel. A viewpoint in between would ...


9

From a technical standpoint, "saturation" is the extent of chromaticity for a certain hue...the hue's "colorfulness". Technically speaking, pink would be a less colorful magenta, but roughly the same hue, where as red would be a distinct and colorful hue on its own. You might think of light rose or salmon to be less colorful variations of red. When it comes ...


9

Aliasing is the result of repeating patterns of roughly the same frequency interfering with each other in an undesirable manner. In the case of photography, the higher frequencies of the image projected by the lens onto the sensor creates and interference pattern (moiré in this case) with the pixel grid. This interference only occurs when those frequencies ...


8

For the best results? Absolutely. There are always little things you can do to tell the story you want to tell in a better way. Remove distractions, draw attention to the subject, enhance aesthetic value of hue combinations, adjust contrast or perceived sharpness, change a transition here, shift emphasis, it goes on forever. Now, let's define best: ...


8

Lightroom offers primarily integration and simplicity. This means a highly integrated workflow which takes care of images from import to publication and a feature set designed to cover the most common processing tasks for photographers. In terms of processing features, Lightroom is far less capable than Photoshop and even includes a workflow to process ...


7

It may help to think about post processing in these terms: When shooting film, you either took the film to the lab, or developed the film yourself. During this "process", you had the opportunity to further tweak the image to produce the desired effect. In the days of film, it may have been the case that you would have made several test prints until you ...


7

There is UFRaw, which is based on dcraw and can be integrated with GIMP.


7

I think Topaz Denoise and Imagenomic Noiseware are the best. I wrote a thorough review on the previous Topaz Denoise (It's in Hebrew, yet Google Translation makes it readable and understandable in English). It should be even better now (Version 4).



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