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31

I agree with apparently everyone else that the "ethics" depend entirely on context. Here are some examples where I think editing is straightforward: 1800s: You could get a "headless portrait" with your head in your lap or on a pitchfork. Unproblematic. I doubt anyone thought that these were real. 1800s: Eadweard Muybridge became famous for his pictures ...


20

It's a blend of two pictures: one showing a road, and another showing a guy dragging a tarp of approximately the same color and width as the road. In particular, note that the grass around the guy looks subtly different from that around the road. It is pretty carefully done, though: it's pretty hard to see where the transitions are. (Well, except for the ...


19

There's a tendency these days to think that photo editing is a modern phenomenon, when in fact it's nearly as old as photography itself. How 'ethical' editing is depends on the genre and the expectation of the viewer. One would expect photojournalism to use little editing other than basic exposure adjustment, whereas an artistic landscape or portrait shot ...


15

Yes, it's possible to select by pixels' intensity range. Step-by-step Make a copy of the layer (Layer → Duplicate Layer) Select the duplicate layer, apply threshold (Colors → Threshold) to select the range of intensities. In Layer → Mask → Add Layer Mask (or right click in the list of layers). Select “Grayscale copy of layer” and “Invert mask”. idem: Mask ...


15

The glare effect on the monitor itself is a digitized effect, it is not real. Technically speaking, it is near impossible to get a clear photograph of a computer screen with the image it is displaying like you can see in that Apple example. What is generally done is a photograph of the screen(s) are taken while they are off, and the images that are ...


14

I'm a gallery represented artist and I want my work to stand for what it is when you see it, not the process I went through to make the piece. I don't do things like add sky, not because it is "wrong" but just because it isn't what my vision does. My tools are my camera, my lenses, my tripod, my miscellaneous gear and of course my laptop and host of ...


13

There are several ways to [attempt to] determine the veracity of an image, with respect to whether it represents a unique capture of a single scene: Image data level inconsistencies Certain processing operations result in telltale "signatures" embedded in the data which are often invisible to the eye but may be identified by statistical analysis. The best ...


13

It's a very clever and effective trick, but provided you have good quality source images it is not that difficult to achieve. You need to overlay the profile and frontal images so they match up at the corner of the right eye and corner of the mouth (shown by the green circles). Then it's a case of blending between two layers along the red line. Certain ...


12

While technically this isn't a "3D" photo, it does simulate a three-dimensional look by exploiting parallax displacement. Cameras are what we call "monocular" devices, in that they have a single lens system and single sensing device. As such, they are not parallax devices, and cannot sense depth directly...only indirectly via other effects such as depth of ...


11

I'm surprised at all the incorrect answers to this! The technique of converting part of a photo to B&W is known as selective colour (the resulting image is sometimes referred to as a cut-out). There are two ways of doing it in Lightroom (v2 onwards) depending on the effect you're trying to achieve. They're both very easy to use. I'll demonstrate using ...


9

Yes, this capability exists to some extent, but not through "signing" the image in the normal sense. It's based on the sensor noise patterns. Jan Lukáš, Jessica Fridrich, and Miroslav Golja (and a few others) at SUNY Binghamton have done work relating to two fields - identification of digital cameras using sensor noise patterns and identification of digital ...


9

There are two distinct steps to producing the images that are frequently labelled "HDR": Exposure blending: merging multiple low dynamic range images into one image with higher dynamic range. Tonemapping: processing that high dynamic range image into a low dynamic range image suitable for viewing on standard [low dynamic range] equipment (such as regular ...


8

Yes, they can sign images. This should prove authenticity although a team claims to have cracked Canon's implementation. Another team did the same for Nikon. So this is like most digital security issues, it will prove authenticity or monumental effort to circumvent it ;)


8

I adopt an "opt out" approach. I assume everything is edited unless it is explicitly stated that this is not the case. I use the same approach, therefore I wont label every photo as being edited, but if I capture something particularly unusual or hard to believe in which case I'll say "this was straight out of camera!", or "this hasn't been composited in ...


8

First you want to start with the best selection possible. Here you have some choices. Select using lasso, quick select (not ideal unless you want to do lots of adjusting). If you do use these, once you've made the best selection you can, click on the Refine Edge button in the tool bar and use the sliders to inteligently adjust your selection. Near ...


8

It is all image creation. Please, let me explain. When you take a photo, regardless of the medium used to record it, what you are recording is a virtual image projected by a lens onto a focal plane. The nature, intensity, and direction of the light illuminating your subject, the design of the lens and the focus and aperture settings, the amount of time the ...


7

In Photoshop, you can access various blurs via the Blur sub-menu in Filters menu. Motion Blur will ask for an angle and an intensity and will blur the entire image (or selection) along that angle making it look like the camera exposed for motion. Radial blur will ask for a point and an intensity and will blur the pixels radially away from that point as if ...


7

it depends what you're looking for. 1) File Meta-info: the meta information contained within the file can reveal which s/w saved the photo last (with possible edits). But this can easily be changed afterwards or deleted by another s/w. 2) Image data: now, if you're looking to find out if a photo file has been tempered (edits made to it), you should look ...


7

To fix this, you need to decompose your image to RGB channels separately. R and G channels are vertically shifted from B channel by 5 pixels each. You need to align these channels vertically. For example I have shifted red channel 10 pixels and green channel 5 pixels from the blue channel. Here is the result with comparison : Shifted one Corrected one ...


6

I think the best solution is to first get your client to take her photos differently. This might not be able to be done with existing products, but a simple setup like this one leaves pleasing backgrounds and ones that are easily removable if needed http://www.diyphotography.net/homestudio/cheap-homemade-diy-studio-no-lighting-needed Whilst this might not ...


6

There is a tutorial for this effect here. It is for PS but you can still achieve the same look in PS. Here are the basic steps below: Add extra canvas to your photo: Image > Canvas Size add some extra here. The amount is not really important as you will crop at the end. Add Black Layer on top, fill with black. Add Noise. Filter > Noise > Add Noise. Use ...


6

It seems to be called Seam Carving, and the Gimp has this feature as Liquid Rescale. You're right -- it collapses out parts of the image with less detail where you won't notice it. Liquid Rescale also has options to mask parts of the image you want to preserve and parts you want to eliminate. There's a great demo in Episode 14 of Meet the Gimp


6

While you can't know for sure, the site fotoforensics.com can provide some insight. Be sure to read the tutorial and check this link for your image: From their analysis, I'd guess the photo has not been doctored. I'm not associated with this site in anyway, although I do think it's pretty interesting stuff.


5

Forget the magic wand. Grab the Free Select (Lasso) tool, and draw a selection around the sky. You can make sure you get right to the edges by going outside the image boundary at the top, left and right. When it comes to the horizon, follow the line of trees very roughly but don't worry about being too precise. Now go to Select > Feather, enter 150 pixels ...


5

There is a plugin called Adagio Range Selection that does pretty much what you want. You can't select from the histogram directly, but you can select the upper and lower boundaries.


5

You'd use the Clone tool in a free program like GIMP. (www.gimp.org) There's also a GIMP plugin called Resynth that allows much easier removal of objects from images (The much-hyped Photoshop Content Aware Fill is based on it), though results vary based on the image. http://www.logarithmic.net/pfh/resynthesizer


5

Based on the sample set of images with the baby and the cat, here is what I believe has been done: The original photo was 2-bit posterized, with a low contrast highlight color and black for the darks. This should be done by duplicating the original photo to a new layer and posterizing the new layer. The levels tool can be used to bring the white point ...


5

It's easу. Photoshop CAN write its name into the EXIF Software tag, so you can locate images that have been edited by Photoshop using any photo management program that can locate images by the EXIF Software tag: However, if you save your images as JPEG using File > Save for Web option (Ctrl + Shift + Alt + S) make sure that you checked the option below: ...


5

People can do whatever the rules allow and/or what they can get away with. You don't have to like it. FWIW (possibly only what you paid for it) I personally tend to feel that photos are usually (not always) diminished by editing that substantially alters what was captured or seen (which are certainly not always the same thing) AND I accept that the ...



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