Road Train !!!!!!!!!!

by Russell McMahon

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16

The faster the transition, the greater the chance of causing damage to your equipment. If you want to protect your equipment from failure due to water(ie condensation issues) a slow gradual transition of about 20mins is the best idea. With that said, I have some tips below and if you follow them, you should be able to safely speed up this process. The issue ...


16

Condensation is the biggest risk, and prevention is always better than cure. One thing I do prior to entering such environments is to place a lens cloth over the front element, and heat it with the heat from my hand prior to entry -- the target is to get the front element above the dew point for the area you're going into. With the specific case of the Eden ...


15

Most lenses aren't perfectly sealed which means you can get moisture on the internal glass elements as well as the front and this can take a while to clear, leading to mould forming which is very bad. You're unlikely to damage a lens if this happens occaisonally but it's just better to avoid condensation in the first place. Condensation occurs when moving ...


10

The best advice I've heard is to put your camera in a sealed plastic bag for several minutes to let it adjust temperature. That way when you take it back out, there isn't condensation on the lens.


9

When attached to the camera and with the front lens cap on the camera will be pretty well protected from dust. Protecting against fungus is a matter of keeping everything dry. Placing everything in a sealed plastic bag is only a good idea if the temperature is kept warmer than when the bag is sealed. Air can hold a certain maximum amount of moisture ...


8

I live in a very humid place. So my equipment has a high risk of getting fungus. What I do is, not keep it inside. Yes, you heard me right :). I use my camera frequently and expose it to sun every now and then (sunlight is a good anti-fungal solution). Apart from that when you are not using your camera for long, make sure you have the silica gel (active) ...


5

In a word, static. Digital cameras are electronic devices, and they also have moving parts, both plastic and metal. This is a great combination for build-up of static charge and for sparks to fly. These sparks — even very, very tiny ones — can cause malfunction of the electronics or even permanent damage. If the camera is just stored in low humidity and ...


5

Normal humidity (i.e. not something like rain forest) is not much of a problem as long as the gear is the same temerature as the air. It's temperature changes that causes problems. The water stays in the air, unless there is something colder that cools the air around it and makes it deposit the water as condensation. Moving a warm camera into colder air is ...


5

Use Desiccant Packets Desiccant packets are often found in new product shipments to absorb moisture. As I can, I save these packets to reuse in my camera bag when traveling. If you’re not the saving type it is possible to order new desiccant packets online. While its impossible for these packets to absorb all the moisture in a camera bag that ...


4

They are saying that the maximum "wetness" of the environment should be 85% relative humidity (RH). As shown on the Psychrometric chart further down, 85% RH is an upper safety limit - air should usually be much dryer than this. At 85% RH you may need a drop in temperature of typically 5 to 10 degrees F to precipitate water out of the air. Not something you ...


4

Are there ways to prevent this static buildup/discharge when using a camera in low humidity? Dons electrical engineer's day-job hat: Summary: Not usually an issue. Means can be provided to equalise person-equipment or person-ground voltages if felt necessary.. If required - the ground of the internal electronics is almost certainly connected to the ...


3

If the camera is stored, unused for long periods in very low humidity, there is a small chance that some of the lubricants will dry out or move. You want the lubricants to stay where they were placed during manufacture. The most common place that folks may inadvertently store a camera in very low RH is in a normal home heated in winter that does not have a ...


3

What you need is a weather-sealed camera and lens. What you are asking is not that stressful for the right camera. I have spend weeks in the jungle without any problems, at least you can get out of the greenhouse to change lenses! If the quality does not matter, you can actually go with a waterproof model but I suggest the weather-sealed one because you can ...


3

Ocean Conditions This may only be a Isolated problem, however I shoot a lot of sea scape shots. The house is of course air conditioned. When the camera and equipment is moved from the house to the area where I am going to shoot I find that condensation will built up in the equipment. This cost me a great deal to repair after a spotting issue developed on ...


2

I'd guess that your dry cabinet probably only dehumidifies. It is kind of like if you have your AC turned on and set to 70 Fahrenheit. If it is 32 degrees outside, you're AC doesn't do anything because it isn't needed, but your temperature is going to drop much lower than 70. Similarly, your room has a lower relative humidity than you are trying to ...


2

Remember, this is a small sensor camera, so dust is magnified. With the note that it is invisible at wide aperture and visible stopped down, the diagnosis is near-certain: there's a speck of dust on the low-pass filter in front of the sensor. (There's a small chance that it's a stain from water as Boby says, as well, but the sample looks more like dust to ...


2

It's hard to be sure from the way you phrased your question, but the way I'd interpret it is that the camera you're referring to should only be used when the humidity is less than 85%. A/C reduces humidity so that shouldn't be a problem.


2

One option would be to look at the relative humidity(RH) that you are setting your dry box at. Usually you want it in the 40-45% range for camera equipment, anything lower and you are just wasting energy. I would make sure you are in this range.


1

I don't know what is and isn't good enough, but if I were concerned about it (and maybe I should be, because I live in Alabama where it gets nice and humid) I might throw a bunch of silica gel in with my equipment. I have some lens cases that came with them (presumably more for the case's protection than the lens) and I keep them in there. $5 in gel packs ...


1

It means do NOT operate the camera if the relative humidity is over 85%. Some water moisture may get inside and do bad stuff. Note, you can easily cause a camera to be exposed to much higher relative humidity. Consider shooting in Alaska in the winter. You keep the camera, and yourself in a nice warm lodge. Inside the heated lodge, the RF is very low, maybe ...



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