Serene Life

by garik

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40

The reason you can see such a large dynamic range isn't that the eye, as an optical device, can actually capture such a range - the reason is that your brain can combine information from lots and lots of "exposures" from the eyes and create an HDR panorama of the scene in front of you. The eye is pretty poor from an image quality standpoint but it has a ...


26

Well, I hate to break it to you, but you can't exactly emulate your eyes. There's a few reasons, let me explain. Humans see much higher resolution in the central fovia (center part of our eyes) than near the edges. Cameras have uniform resolution everywhere. The dynamic range is handled differently between cameras and humans. I can't explain it, but a ...


26

I'm going to give two answers which appear to be in conflict but which actually aren't: There are dark yellows and bright violets — we're just not used to seeing them. There aren't and can't be dark yellows or bright violets — and here's why. OK... 1. There are dark yellows and bright violets Color perception is relative. Here is a demonstration. If ...


25

The eye moves I'd like to add to the answer of @Pearsonartphoto, that human eyes do not see a still scene, instead they scan it continuously, adjusting their “aperture” and refocusing as they scan it. So thanks to this scanning process we can perceive: the higher dynamic range, an infinite depth of field, a wider scene as a whole, much more detail than a ...


24

Why the wide aperture blurs the background more Let me start with Wikipedia figure: Above we have a wide open aperture. Only point 2 is in focus. Points 1 and 3 are out of focus. Due to wide aperture, the rays coming from them through different parts of the lens intersect the screen 5 (a film or a digital sensor) in different points. We may also tell ...


22

"Colour" is essentially a property of the distribution of wavelengths of visible light (as perceived by humans). Digital cameras only detect the amount of light at each pixel, they can't measure the wavelength and thus can't record colours directly. Colour images are produced by placing alternating red/green/blue filters in front of each pixel. By placing a ...


20

This is a very good question, and the answer could fill hundreds of pages - and, in fact, the answer already DOES fill hundreds of pages. The short answer is that the figures you are citing to not agree with apparent reality because the commonly quoted figures are wrong :-). Read on ... Much is available on the internet on this subject and the quality is, ...


19

When discussing the number of colors perceptible to the human eye, I tend to refer to the 2.4 million colors of the CIE 1931 XYZ color space. It is a fairly solid, scientifically founded number, although I do admit it may be limited in context. I think it may be possible for the human eye to be sensitive to 10-100 million distinct "colors" when referring to ...


19

There are many different types of color blindness. Which one are you? In my case I have serious issues discriminating small differences in hues in the red, orange, yellow, green region of the spectrum (deuteranomaly, I read). This happens to me pretty often; invited for dinner last weekend, I identified the hostess's new wall color as orange, not yellow. ...


18

I'm color blind (or rather have a color vision deficiency). Specifically my eyes are less sensetive to red light than other colors. I can't really say that I suffer from it. It makes it harder to pick lingonberries, and I have problem reading tiny red text on a black background, but that's about it. I might perhaps photograph red objects differently, as I ...


18

I'm going to crib from my answer to an earlier question on aperture: When the aperture is very small, the admitted light is highly "collimated", which is a fancy way of saying "all the rays are nicely parallel to each other". This results in a sharp focus for all the light that comes in. When the aperture is more open, only the rays which closely match ...


16

There's a specification on (d)SLR bodies called viewfinder magnification; this refers to how large an object appears in the viewfinder when a 50mm lens is mounted and focused at infinity. On mid-range DSLRs, which typically have around 0.95x magnification, an object will appear to be life-sized at 52.6mm. With entry-level DSLRs, you might have around 0.8x ...


16

Question about thing like frame rate, resolution or dynamic range of the human eye and how they compare to cameras always have the same problems: The "picture" you see isn't a "single exposure", the eye is constantly moving and adjusting. The part of tee brain that handles vision is really good (and pretty big), it constantly combines the "frames" is gets ...


16

The image we can see from an infrared camera is what is known as a false color image. What this means is that a range of wavelengths in the infrared spectrum are rendered with a corresponding wavelength of visible light. Just as with visible light, a particular wavelength of infrared light can vary in intensity from just above black (shadows) to near ...


14

The human eye seeks the light, and usually locates the brightest spot in the image. If there is one bright spot, that's usually the place we start looking. There are no definitive rules in photography, and I'm not trying to say that you always need to let the subject be the "bright spot" in the image, but if you want to lead the viewer to the most ...


14

What you are seeing is the effect of viewfinder magnification. For whatever reason (probably simply to make the numbers sound better), this spec is usually given for a 50mm lens, even on APS-C. The Canon 60D, for example, has a 0.95x magnification with a 50mm lens focused at infinity. And that's why around 50mm gives you the magic double-vision effect. ...


11

There are several key points, of which I will pick my top ones. The human vision system will re-focus very quickly, and only at what it is looking at in that moment. It is therefore difficult to look at a scene and see any kind of out of focus blur. This will cause humans to not realize the effect of certain areas being out of focus — you can't trust your ...


11

The human eye really sucks compared to modern camera lenses. The human visual system, on the other hand, far surpasses any modern camera system (lens, sensor, firmware). The human eye is only sharp in the centre. In fact, it's only sharp in one very, very tiny spot known as the fovea, which is a spot whose diameter is less than one percent of our total ...


11

I usually see this described as creating a "leading line". The human eye typically will read/view left to right, so typically a leading line will follow this notion and lead the viewer right to what the photographer intended to highlight in the photo. Depending on the type of photography you can use things such as roads, trees, a fence, a models hair, the ...


10

The eye has two types of photoreceptive cells, rods and cones. Rod cells work in low light and are located toward the periphery of the eye and sense form and movement whereas cone cells are densely packed in the centre of the eye and sense colour but require more light. Think *c*one = *c*olour to help remember which is which. There are three types of cone ...


10

(With much help from the Wikipedia article) Our eyes are a 2 lens system, the first being our outer eye, and the second being a lens just inside of our eye. Our eyes has a fixed focal length, of about 22-24 mm. We have significantly higher resolution near the center than at the edges. The resolution varies significantly based on where in the image you are ...


10

In fact, if you spend the night in a remote enough place with clear, moon-free sky you will see most of the colors. The sad truth is that most of us live in cities where light polution and smog do not let us see anything except the brightest stars.


10

Inside the viewfinder is a convex lens which enables your eye to focus on the screen. This works in exactly the same way as convex lens used in a pair of glasses to correct long sightedness. The power of this lens is usually adjustable via a small dial next to the eyepiece to account for differences in people's eyesight. Some people who wear glasses have ...


10

Human eyes see moiré in the overlapping of two regular patters. In photos you see the photographed pattern overlapped with the pixels, which form the second pattern. Of course you can see moiré with your naked eyes, but you need two overlapped patterns in the scene. Your eyes don't add one of them.


9

One of the issues with trying to emulate human sight in a photograph is the field of view. The perspective we see, which is a function of relative focal length is by most accounts roughly the perspective of a 50mm lens on a full frame sensor or 32mm on a DX sensor, but then the problem isn't perspective, it's field of view. Think of the picture you see at ...


9

The photographer Evgen Bavcar is not colour-blind: He is blind.


9

There's so much more to photography than just color, and even if one eliminates color (e.g., b/w or tone processing), there are many photographers doing spectacular work in those realms. What you'd be likely to see is a shift in emphasis, such as more concentration on composition, or depth of field, or macro imaging. But this does not force you to a ...



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