Serene Life

by garik

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8

The only program I've used is Hugin, but I'm really happy with it. I think it's pretty easy to use, and for the most part it's an automatic process. You'll spend most of your time waiting for the software to process the photos, so your best bet is to just install some software and start using it so you can get your results sooner!


7

Question: How do photographers usualy make rivers in gigapixel photos? Answer: They buy a Gigapan robot which shoots a structured panorama, i.e. a regular one in say a 5x5 grid and then use the software that came with their robot to merge the images. Having said that though, if you have such a structured layout, you could use Microsoft ICE just as well (as ...


4

THE beginner pano app has to be Autostitch. There is almost no interface, you open a bunch of files and select the output size. That's it! It does not get any easier than that. Then there is also Microsoft ICE. It's the same principle in that it stitches without user input but it does let you tweak the horizon, center-point and projection interactively. ...


4

Your lens should be marked as "Normal" in Hugin, and the focal length multiplier of your camera is 1.0. The auto-alignment in Hugin can be frustrating at times. I have found that the wider the field of view the more difficult it is for Hugin to align images. There are also a few different algorithms that you can choose to automatically select and align ...


4

Have you looked at the stitching flat scanned images tutorial for Hugin? Summarizing the tutorial: set the horizontal field of view to 10 degrees with crop factor = 1.0x assign each image a different lens number create control points as you usually do (manually or automatically) optimize roll, x, y and z for all images except your anchor image (do not ...


4

It seems that this is what the template feature is for. How can I reuse a project as a template? If you copy a .pto project to a different folder and open it with hugin, you will be prompted for the 'missing' images. You should delete any control points from this template project since they won't be relevant to the new photos. Alternatively you can ...


3

In the Mask tab you can select regions of the picture that you don't want Hugin to use in the final panorama. You just have to be careful to not mask out a part of the panorama that only exists in that low-res picture, because then you will get a hole.


3

I got it to work. I had two trials. First, I looked for a similar situation among my existing files, I found three from the same perspective at different focal lengths. They were much closer than your range, though (18mm to 55mm). Hugin could read the EXIF data and adjusted horizontal field of view (hfov, parameter v) accordingly. Then I simulated your ...


3

If you use 6.03 for the Focal length multiplier field you should be good to go. The Sony PowerShot DSC T-100 lists the 5.8-29mm focal length as 35 equivalent to 35-175mm. This figures out to 6.035, but the 1/2.5" sensor of your camera is in a 4:3 ratio instead of the standard 35mm 3:2 ratio. The diagonal of a standard 35mm film frame divided by the 7.18mm ...


3

In addition to picking your software, you'll want to remember a couple things while shooting. First, always shoot in manual mode, and use the same exposure for all your shots. If you let the camera adjust aperture and/or shutter from shot to shot, even the best stitching software will have a hard time avoiding a patchwork quilt look. Second, although I ...


3

The command line you typed for celeste should work. What I would look into next is: Confirm that the file celeste.model is in the same folder as celeste_standalone.exe Look from what path you are calling it, and possibly adding the hugin\bin folder in the path for your command line 'SET PATH=%PATH%;c:\huginFolder\bin' Having it in the bin saved me from ...


2

Well... I suspect that your probably more looking for FOSS applications, I will put in a vote for PTgui. The thing I really appreciate about using it is although there's a lot of feature depth to the program if you want to dig in and get your hands dirty, it's super-simple to get started... you only have to be able to point to a folder with your initial ...


2

Yes, that's a tough problem – you have the option of Editing the three bracketed nadir shots separately in GIMP (bad idea, because you'll never be able to rubber-stamp exactly the same pattern in each exposure). Creating tone-mapped stacks of each individual tile, then editing the nadir shots in GIMP and stitching them in Hugin (not recommended, especially ...


2

Looking at the last result, I think that's as good as you'll get modifying each set, so I would do as you suggest and use a radial gradient. To select grey to white, rather than black to white, set your foreground/background colors to grey and white before selecting the gradient tool. Or you can use black/white, set blending mode to overlay and use layer ...


2

The answer to your question is this. It is possible to stitch an equirectangular panorama or a stereographic projection from handheld offset images but you are likely to end up with problems like the one in your images, especially when you are that close to things you are photographing. You see the problem with the ceiling may not necessarily be connected ...


2

Try using Darktable instead. The 'lens correction' module shown above should help remove the fisheye effect. If your lens is in the database it can automatically make the correction, or if not you may adjust manually.


1

I found the following instructions which helped me achieve what I was looking for: http://m43photo.blogspot.de/2012/03/defishing-fisheye-images.html http://m43photo.blogspot.de/2014/07/olympus-9mm-fisheye-vs-rectilinear.html For my lens I found the following parameters useful: Lens type: Full frame Fisheye Focal length: 9mm Focal length multiplier: 2.2 ...


1

If you have overlapping areas and can set control points, it should work nevertheless. The resulting FOV may be incorrect (it is ill-defined in Hugin anyway) but this does not mean a bad output. The resulting FOV is accurate only if you have a 360° panorama.


1

If the overlap is always exactly the same and you want it disposed of in the same way, you could use ImageMagick, and specifically its montage subprogram. This is outlined in detail with great examples at ImageMagick v6 Examples -- Montage, Arrays of Images, and I won't duplicate that here. If things vary slightly from image to image and from run to run, ...


1

Detecting control points is not enough. You need to compute/optimise the camera parameters in the Optimiser tab. You can look at the Hugin documentation for more information: http://wiki.panotools.org/Hugin_Photos_tab#Optimise


1

I think your problem is that you want to nadir patch before you stitch, rather than after. I never do it before. I always do it after. So, if I'm exposure fusing a bunch of bracketed sets as stacks in Hugin/PTGui, I always do the stitch first. Both Hugin and PTGui now have masking features, which will let you eliminate the panohead and tripod from the ...


1

One issue that you may run into with multiple exposures from bracketing is that the photos from each set do not line up properly. However, it will be smoothest to create the panorama prior to HDR since it will combine the photos using the originals. I know with Photoshop, you can create awesome HDR photos without any extensions and it will auto align your ...



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