Incense

by Bart Arondson

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19

The technology is not primtive but actually quite advanced. Every component important to photography is constantly being researched and improved. The cost of those improvements are passed on to buyers, just as with everything else. Furthermore some of what you suggest would render a camera worse for photography: The interface of each manufacturer is ...


12

I'm totally with Itai on this one. DSLR's are by no means "primitive". On the contrary, they are very advanced and refined tools for serious photographers. To answer each of your points directly. A primitive interface If you are referring to the menu systems...they may visually look primitive, however they are designed for functionality, not looks. ...


7

The general approach I use with ND filtration is to compose and meter your scene first without filtration. I also use the Lee filter holder, which has the handy feature that allows you to clip/unglip the actual filter holder to/from the lens adapter fairly easily. The general process to expose for any amount of ND filtration, including the Big Stopper or ...


4

The same way as any ND filter I suppose :) Mine is an ND400 from Hoya and it is pretty consistent, so all I need as a basic calculator. There is a FREE Android App on which calculates things for me. You first need to enter the strength of your ND filter and the metered exposure without the filer on. It then tells you how many seconds or minutes the exposure ...


3

Alex Lindsay of PixelCorp has been arguing that the UI of cameras are primitive for years. His arguments have some merit, but only on the menu systems. If you are first picking up a DSLR, I agree that the menus seem clumsy. But Canon and Nikon have been building on their menu systems for years, and their loyal customers have been trained to use them as they ...


3

I've just started experimenting with a 9 stop ND filter. First, thing I've noticed is that just playing with the exposure really helps. Try 30 seconds, try a minute, try 15 seconds. See what looks good. Once you get your exposure set, then work on the scene. So don't worry about the missing list, just experiment. Right now I'd say you need more time since ...


2

If it doesn't look like this, then it is not a reverse grad. Found at 2filter.com, http://www.2filter.com/prices/Hitech/HitechReverseGradual.html


2

I think the answer (link) provided by Itai covers a lot. Allow me to add in a few more answers to your questions. The design and interface of the DSLR are considered quite advanced as they take into thoughts on the button/grip placement when the DSLR in use. The design of the DSLR allows DSLR users to easily change the parameters (such as ISO, Aperture, ...


2

The differences between a smartphone and a dSLR camera are due mostly to the fact each product is made to the demands of a particular market segment. Each has a different primary purpose that is not at all related to the other; the primary purpose of a dSLR camera is to produce digital image files of high quality and resolution. The primary purpose of a ...


1

primitive interface It's functional, it's very fast to use, simple. No diving through hundreds of buttons, menu options, dialog boxes, to do basic things like in an "advanced" user interface. wifi I don't want wifi on my camera, I don't need it. And the same is true for most all serious photographers. When I'm shooting I'm in places where there is no ...


1

The trick here is that it is a professional device. This is almost a question that I think would fit better on UX, but the key is that what is good design on a phone is not what is good design on a camera. A DSLR, particularly high end ones, are professional tools designed to do one thing and do it excellently. That is, take photos, at as high quality, as ...



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