Napioa - Wind Origins

Napioa - Wind Origins
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19

You 'kill the ambient' when you set the flash(es) power high enough so that at the chosen aperture, shutter speed and ISO the contribution made by ambient light is insignificant to the picture. In other words, taking the picture in full darkness with flash only while all other variables are the same would give you the same result.


19

I just read that a normal flash illuminates a scene within a 1/250th of a second. (A flash would keep the scene illuminated for a 1/250th of a second, right? In general, that's wrong. Flash duration is flash duration and sync speed is sync speed. Apples and oranges. The 1/250th of a second is the sync speed of (many) cameras. That's basically the ...


14

As Michael said, shutter speed is largely irrelevant – flash duration and timing relative to bullet passage is what counts. Shutter speed can be as SLOW as is helpful – maybe even "bulb". Assuming that the photos is not doctored: Bullet speed should be arranged to be as slow as possible without adversely affecting the affect on the target. ...


13

Location Find a spot with a clear view of a turn or a curve on the race track, and get as close to the ground as you possibly can. However, there will be tall fences around the race course in Baltimore to keep spectators out and flying debris in, so the view from the lowest seats might be partially obstructed. While the cars will be going faster on the ...


13

When you set a shutter speed, the camera will increase and decrease the aperture to match the desired shutter speed. If your aperture is maxed out on either end, it'll over/under expose the image. There are a few newer cameras that have an auto-ISO feature, which will attempt to expand the range, but without knowing what kind of camera you have, I can't tell ...


12

How to kill the ambient light "Killing the ambient light" is a term used when you want to take a picture that is purely lit by flash, so that you have complete control over the lighting in the picture you are taking. It follows, therefore, that if you were to take the image without the flashes enabled, the image would be very heavily/completely ...


10

Because I am sometimes asked to do these sorts of shots as part of my business, where 'trial and error' is often incompatible with 'client budget,' I use a programmable intervalometer with a variety of sensors which give me that ability to capture the sorts of pictures where 'timing is everything.' Among other things over the years I've used such devices to ...


10

The camera doesn't matter. In high speed photography such as this photo it is all about the speed of the flash and being able to fire it at precisely the correct moment. The flash is usually fired with an electronic trigger that reacts, after a specific delay of several milliseconds, to the noise of the gun firing . The camera's shutter can remain open for ...


9

If you mean a shot like this: You can just pop up your on-camera flash, like I did. I believe this was taken at about 1/250 with an ISO of 400. Live View is useful for pre-focussing, and continuous shooting mode means you don't have to perfectly time your shot. I just put a jug in my kitchen sink and set up with a tripod.


9

1/2000 sec is usually fast enough for not requiring a tripod and having frozen splashes. If you use a tripod, make sure that the IS is actually turned off, otherwise you induce blur into the image. For solving the "darkness" problem, use a flash and stroboscope technique (long shutter speeds in a dark room, where the flash is what freezes the motion). If ...


9

The freezing of motion has more to do with the duration of the light than it does with the speed of a shutter. Obviously, with a continuous source of light, the only way to reduce the duration of it is with your shutter, but when you do control the light, that's a very different story. The technique I use to freeze the motion of something like water ...


9

The most common setup is the following: Very dark room Long exposure ( seconds ) Trigger the flash (low power flash for a very fast burst) at the correct time. Flash can be triggered by sound ( useful if you want to take a broken glass picture) or laser sensor ( useful for moving objects ). Sometimes a small delay should be added. Often an Arduino board ...


9

Refer to page 19 of your ST-E3-RT manual. It specifies that when used with camera models released prior to 2012 (so, anything but the 1DX and 5D mark III at the time of this post) you lose high speed sync and your max sync speed is "one increment slower" than whatever it would normally be. The flash sync speed is 1 increment slower Check the flash ...


9

So, why a dark place and a flash is to be required to freeze the motion (take a high speed photo) though in a bright place with a, say, 1/4000th of a second, we can take a high speed photo? This is because the flash sync speed, the maximum shutter speed at which the entire image sensor is exposed at the same time, is much slower than 1/4000s. On a ...


8

What does it mean? As Miguel says, it's overpowering the ambient light entirely. Indoors you can usually do this by increasing the shutter speed to the maximum sync speed of the camera (usually 1/200th or 1/250th). Increasing the shutter speed won't affect the flash exposure because it is so much shorter duration than the shutter speed. If that isn't ...


7

For shooting an Oreo in milk you don't necessarily need a very high speed. In the image below you can see similar idea where the speed was 1/250sec (flash sync speed): In the past I tried capturing waterdrops. The problem was that with my older 380ex flash, when it was set off-camera it fired in full power, so the exposure was too long to get a real ...


6

You still need to expose correctly! Exposure is covered in depth in this answer. What you've done is increase one leg of the exposure, by using a longer shutter speed. Now you need to decrease the overall exposure by the same amount to get back to a properly-exposed image. So for example, if your camera's exposure meter told you to take a picture at 1/60 ...


6

If you want fast recycle times on the 430ex and most other speedlights, you need an external battery. No AA sized battery can deliver enough power -- its a limitation of the physical size of the battery's chemicals. The internal impedance rises as power is drawn, and the chemicals have to redistribute themselves to provide subsequent power. You need a large, ...


6

I took shots like this in Doc Edgerton's lab in the 80's. The setup was simple. Basic film camera, nothing special Rifle permanently mounted at the end of a long rail Sliding support for target which can be adjusted along the rail Microphone connected to the strobe (on or nearby the camera) From experience we would guess roughly where to place the ...


6

Because there's a lot more to "taking a photo" than just opening and closing the shutter. The data has to be read off the sensor, processed to a greater (JPEG) or lesser (RAW) extent and a greater (RAW) or lesser (JPEG) amount of data written to storage. Doing that once, then waiting a second and doing it again is relatively easy - and that's what bridge ...


6

I just read that a normal flash illuminates a scene within a 1/250th of a second. (A flash would keep the scene illuminated for a 1/250th of a second, right? Sort of, depending on the specifics of the flash unit and the power setting. For example, a Canon 580EX Speedlite set to full power discharges over 1/250s according to Andy Gock's Actual Measured ...


5

This is one of the key differences between "speed light" hotshoe flashes and traditional studio lighting. With studio lighting, flash power is determined by the amount of capacitor charge, and the duration increases (slightly) for lower-powered flashes. For hotshoe flashes, the capacitor is charged to full but the burst of light stopped when the proper ...


5

For high speed work I would look into the Paul C Buff Einstein. From the guy behind Alienbees, this strobe was specifically designed for high speed work. Unlike most monolites utilizes tail-trimming whereby power to the bulb is cut after a certain duration to reduce power. This effectively means the lower the power the shorter the flash duration. Other ...


4

Shooting indoor fast action is hard enough with a dSLR, asking that from a medium-price point and shoot is quite much. At least try to get a front row seat, so you would not have to amplify blur with a long focal length. If you only need to shoot one event, you could rent a dSLR with a fast tele lens for considerably less than your budget. You could also ...


4

Vision Research Phantom cameras are very fast. The Flex can shoot 2,800 fps at full HD (1920x1080). At lower resolutions, the v711 can shoot at 1.4 million fps!


4

There are three mechanisms to regulate the power of a flash, with different influence on flash duration. Capacitor switching. By having several capacitors and only charging some of them a lower intensity burst of light is produced. Usually only a few settings are available, and this method is mainly used on pack and head lights. This method has the effect ...


3

Just to clarify the jargon, "ambient" light is the existing lighting. Most flash photography captures some form of balance between the flash and the existing (ambient) light, as MikeW said a common reason for wanting to overpower the ambient if it is the wrong colour.


3

The Nikon V1 does 320x120 at 1200fps. The Optronis CamRecord CV does 1280x1024 at 100,000fps, or so I believe from http://www.optronis.com/produkte/high-speed-kameras-cv/camrecord-cv.html


3

If they'll let you go there (which I kind of doubt) the inside of turn 3 (the hairpin) would be great. Second choice (and should still be really good) would be the chicane, around grandstands 26 and 27. Another good choice (but apparently more expensive) be inside turn 9. If at all possible I'd advise going to some sort of local races a bit first (doesn't ...



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