Westminster fountain at sunset

by Jorge Córdoba

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10

Cold and hot are quite different and I can only answer the cold part since I live in Canada and have not been above 40+ with a digital camera. Living in Canada and reviewing digital cameras means that I have taken hundreds of cameras out at temperatures well below freezing. What normally happens is not very nasty but will stop you from taking pictures. ...


8

An image sensor is basically a small computer chip, and have similar heating characteristics. When transistor gates switch from on to off, or the other way you have small electrical currents in the chip. Everywhere on the chip there is a tiny amount of resistance, and when you have currents going through resistors most of the energy turns into heat. During ...


6

When it comes to night sky photography and stacking, there is no real substitute for actual SNR (Signal to Noise Ratio). You can virtually improve SNR by stacking hundreds of very short exposures (like stacking 720 10-second exposures), but the result will never quite be the same as if you stack say forty 3-minute exposures. Stacking a bunch of 30 second ...


5

If you see the Canon 600D specification sheet here it says: Operating Environment 0 – 40 °C, 85% or less humidity If the manufacturer guarantees it will operate within those temperatures it will be safe to store it within those temperatures, especially as I believe a lot of operating specifications given by manufacturers are pessimistic, ...


5

Temperature effects camera in a couple of key areas: Chemical reactions. When the temperature drops below a certain level you get a voltage drop from the batteries as the chemical reacts that produce energy are being inhibited by the temperature. This is a temporary effect. Expansion / contraction. Certain parts will expand and contract with heat, lenses ...


4

My guess is that the high end is limited by the electronics. Silicon stops being a semiconductor at around 150°C and of course some margin is needed, so most electronics is rated for less than that. A max operating temperature of 70°C is common, with special variants available (for a premium) that can work up to 120°C. Some military grade ...


4

The car trunk is about as safe from cool as anywhere in the car if the car is sealed. Trunk temperatures may be dangerously high on very hot days. Use of a very well insulated container in the trunk is likely to maintain safe temperatures Ventilation or some form of active cooling would help but are unlikely to be necessary. Active ventilation of the ...


3

The answer will be highly dependent on the specifics of the situation, such as how much heat and humidity, and over what period of time. It's unlikely that anyone will be able to provide an accurate answer for your situation because you very likely haven't recorded the temperature and humidity levels over the storage period, but "incredibly hot" can't be ...


3

EE hat on: (1) A "radiation shield" will help heaps - basically if you can keep direct sun off it to max extent sensibly possible. Reflected sun from bonnet (hood) and some re-radiation form other surfaces will happen but (2) handles that. (2) "Forced" air cooling makes a massive difference. A small fan with a very modest airflow directed appropriately ...


3

From my personal experience I can tell you that cold temperatures below 15 degrees C will only make the batteries run out quicker than normal. I have been in the polar circle with a pro and semi pro camera (D300 and D60) and none of them stopped working; but I had to change batteries quicker than normal. As Matt Grum said before, having the batteries in the ...


2

As a practical matter on real world cameras, the heat side can be a real issue if you are sloppy in handling it. The inside of a car in the sun on a warm day (100 F (38 C) can easily go to 150F (65C) which is way over the upper limit that makers list. The solution is pretty simple: don't keep your camera in the interior, put it in the trunk.


2

Shot noise depends only on the amount of incoming light, thus providing the total exposure times are the same you don't gain anything in terms of shot noise by averaging short exposures (the long exposure is effectively doing the averaging for you). In practice shooting multiple exposures has the effect of increasing the read noise from the sensor in the ...


2

I live in South America, in Uruguay, where our heat during summer is around 36C up to 42 C (rare but this year we are having a heat wave). I have used my Canon 60D with heat, and left it in my car for a short time, around half an hour, I covered it with some clothing, yeah it sounds stupid, nothing happened to it. What's more dangerous than heat, in our ...


1

This can sometimes be caused by an old/slow SD card. Make sure the SD card is fast enough, generally, just look for class 10 (It'll have a circle with a 10 in it somewhere on the card). If it's less than that, it might not work. The other thing is that as SD cards get older, they can become less reliable, try doing a Low Level format (See here if you don't ...


1

As far as going into a menu whilst recording, I can tell you that my Canon T1i does not permit the action. That is, pressing the MENU button results in no action, and recording continues. Going into MENU is only supported in LIVE VIEW while not recording. Here you may see some heat savings as the return back to to LIVE VIEW takes around a half-second to ...



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