India Point Park

India Point Park
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-1

If my camera had such an automatic HDR bracketing mode, I'd probably wind up not using it very much. It already has an HDR mode that I never use, because I don't want it deciding how to mix or emphasize the HDR – that's my job and my vision. Automatic HDR bracketing would be a "sophomore"-level feature – it's a step or two past novice photography, but once ...


0

Because photography is about a lot more than just proper exposure. The camera can't read your mind to see how you wish the final image to turn out. Imagine a scene that would be properly exposed at ISO400, 1/125 second, and f/5.6. You could also expose the same scene at the same level using ISO 400, 1/1000 second, and f/2. Or ISO 400, 1/15 second, and f/16. ...


13

There are quite a few advantages. A difficult problem that often arises is blooming of bright areas into adjacent dark areas. So, the overexposed pixels that are in the bright area will leak electrons to adjacent pixels, making them get gray values that are too high. If the contrast is very high, those pixels may be in dark areas. This means that with only ...


4

More images will give you better signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), since you will have a good SNR for every absolute brightness value if you do more intermediate steps. The brightest captured parts of the image will have the best SNR and, thus, “details”, it's the same reason for “expose to the right” (see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exposing_to_the_right). If ...


2

I know this is an older post but I have a Samsung Note 3. I have an HDR app on the phone that takes 3 different pictures all at difference exposure settings. It then combines the three images and allows me to tweak the settings for the look I want. The process of taking 3 separate pictures is slow. This is a HARDWARE limitation. If anything in your ...


0

Exposure fusing is a different technique of combining images than HDR algorithms. So, it's basically having another way of doing a similar task. Photomatix, for example, performs both exposure fusing and HDR. What an HDR technique is doing is to remap the values of the set of images along a scale large enough to encompass the entire high dynamic range, ...


0

There is not a whole lot of difference between the two. While Enfuse does have the ability to set certain weights for contrast, saturation and exposure, it does not have any options to do manual tone mapping. That is important if you want to be able to tweak how the intermediate 32-bit HDR images will turn out before it is exported out as a 16-bit TIFF file ...



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