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0

You can simulate multiple exposures in post-processing. The custom setting you found is not for taking brackets of shots, it's simply for setting whether you want 1/2 stops or 1/3 stops as the units for partial-stop settings on the camera. And yes, the 600D can perform autobracketing. You cannot, however, change the number of shots you can get in a set ...


2

In addition to Philip Kendall's answer, the document you've found advising that the Canon 600D can't take multiple exposures, is referring to the ability to shoot more than one exposure and combine them in camera to produce a single image. For info on that technique see this question How can multiple exposure be achieved with a digital camera? and ...


6

Yes, it can - the option you're after is "auto exposure bracketing" (AEB), which can most easily be configured from the quick menu - select the meter (the -3 to +3 scale), press "SET", then turn the control wheel. At this point, the little indicator marker should split into three, which will mean that the next three shots the camera takes will have normal ...


1

It is entirely possible to make a light sensor with logarithmic properties - such a sensor would have incredible dynamic range at the expense of limited resolution for a particular exposure. Getting both requires a high resolution ADC. For CT imaging 24 bits linear is typically used - and then the logarithm is taken after offset adjustment to create the CT ...


1

In addition to @BShaw's answer, if you're a Mac/Aperture user the following blog post might help: http://www.crystal-objects.com/blogs/frank/time_lapsed_photography_aperture_using_applescript050911 It's a script to take a specified number of photographs at a chosen interval between them. I have used the script successfully to create time-lapse videos. My ...


9

Seeing is an active process A big issue is that looking with your eyes is very unlike capturing an image - an image needs to include all information that the looker might look at, but normal vision is an active process that involves movement of the eyes, refocusing and dilation of pupils according to the objects we're looking at. Thus, if you want to ...


19

There are already camera's with DR larger than the human eye, both instantly and overall. The human eye's dynamic range is not as large as most people tend to think it is. As I recall, it is somewhere around 12 to 16 EVs, which is right around the level of a modern DSLR. The primary difference is that we have extremely natural aperture control that will ...


6

Your mental image is the product of not only the retina, but its interplay with the all the other components involved in vision, including the pupil and of course your brain. What may seem to you as a 'one picture' is in fact the result of high-speed adjustments and information processing and not a single snapshot. You can find more information on this ...


-3

One of the reasons is that sensitivity of materials is based on linear scale, sensitivity of the human eye is based on logarithmic scale. What mean this: for eye to have feeling of two time more light you need to provide 10 time more intensity of light. So if say eye have 10 "stops" of sensitivity this mean 10 on power of 10 (10 billions) time more light. ...


1

A quick look around shows that there are several wired solutions for remote control. For Canon cameras, there's something called DSLR controller that can use a connected mobile wifi router. Lr timelapse claims that this works with nikon cameras as well, using DSLR dashboard. I certainly think it can't hurt to get an OTG cable for the smartphone and see if ...


1

To find out what tone mappings have been applied, both in camera and in post processing when there is no data about that in the exif file, one can consider a few pictures with a shallow depth of field, such as this one. Unfortunately, downloading has been disabled, but nothing stops you from taking a screenshot and using that to analyze the picture. What you ...


1

@Garfrey - First, thank you for pointing out this excellent photographer. In regard to her style and secret, I believe Ms. Gadd is able to envision the final image before she shoots it. For example, in her excellently composed photo, 'Lost in Her Reverie', Ms. Gadd places herself exactly between the camera and the waterfall. She selected to wear dark ...


1

To figure this out you start down the path into style and composition, not just making sure a photo a technically competent. Instead of worrying about the geeky bits of photography, you start putting your energy into the artistic and esthetic aspects. A strong voice about this is David duChemin, who publishes through Craft and Vision ...



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