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14

The big pro to this is, as you say, the ability to take many pictures in a short period of time, allowing you to pick the best frame. However, there are several cons to this approach: Lower resolution. Even "Full High Def", 1080p, is only 2 megapixel (1920 * 1080 = 2,073,600). This would give you an acceptable print size of 6.4x3.6 inches, at 300 DPI. ...


8

Honestly I would not expect this to happen. If the card is too slow, every camera I've seen it happen with simply stops recording. In all likelihood, you are seeing dropped frames on playback. This means you computer (or some component of it like the graphics card, chipset, memory or I/O) is too slow. If you are trying to playback the movie directly from ...


8

I've read somewhere (can't find source) that every freeze frame from an HD video is essentially a high-resolution photo (is this even true?). No, not true at all really :( Here's why: First up, it's not high resolution. Even 1080P ("Full HD") video, which not all cameras can do, is only 2 megapixels. That's a fraction of the sensor's resolution. ...


6

Your camera's user manual recommends at least class 6 SD cards. (It also lists "approved" memory cards.) You have a class 10, which is faster. So why not just shoot a few minutes of a movie right now and verify that it works fine?


6

The 5D Mk2 has a far larger sensor (because its a full frame camera) and more pixels. My assumption would be the camera scales down the input to 1920x1080 so having more uncompressed data allows it to give a higher quality output. If Andres's comment about it skipping lines whilst taking video is right, then the improvement in quality is more likely down ...


5

Why do high resolution cameras shoot stills at high resolutions, but only typically shoot video at 1080p which is about 2 megapixels? For example I have a Sony-NEX 6 which can shoot stills at 16 megapixels but only 1080p by 1920p video. There are several reasons why most high resolution still cameras that also shoot video don't produce video at ...


5

As you said, they could be 100% identical. In all likelyhood they are not but given the bit-rate is the same for the same resolution, frame-rate and codec, I think it is safe to say that any difference will probably be negligible. You are probably right that the second processor is probably not fully needed for video in this case. It is probably there to ...


5

Recording HD video is more taxing on the cameras image processor, whereas shooting Raw in burst mode is far more taxing on the file system / SDHC card. It's easy to see why this is the case, the camera does very little work to encode the Raw data as no (or next to no) processing of the image information is performed. On the other side of the coin, your ...


4

HD video will be far more taxing than shooting RAW in burst mode. The reason is that the camera has to compress video constantly and write to the card nonstop for the entire time that you are recording video. If it gets behind, there's no break in the action for it to catch up. When you're using burst mode, eventually the camera will ratchet back your fps in ...


4

If you are looking for tools to reduce focusing noise (sound) in your videos: sometimes, when the noise becomes too unnerving I demux (separate video and audio) the video and use Audacity (free) for reworking the sound. Audacity is not the best tool and you need a "silent" part to properly denoise but it helps a bit. The plus is, that if you already demuxed ...


4

Component video (the cable with the red/green/blue connectors) can be an HD output but is analogue so won't be as faithful a reproduction as you might want. With output at 500 lines (pixels high) it sounds like you're using a composite video connection (the Red/White/Yellow connectors.) This is common on most consumer video capture devices and is limited ...


3

The 650D shoots video in MOV format only But don't worry about quality... WMV, AVI and MOV are just container formats and their construction has limited bearing on the encoded contents inside (TIFF also is the same.) That means converting to your preferred container can be done quickly and with no loss of quality. It's just an extra step is all. For any ...


3

At the risk of being controversial, I'd suggest a good quality stills camera, that offers HD video capability; something like the Canon T2i (in the US) which appears to be a bit above your budget at around 750 USD. With the larger sensor in a DSLR, you'll be able to get more of a cinematic effect with wide apertures, and the associated shallow depth of ...


3

Data rates, data rates, data rates. A high resolution photo from a 24 megapixel sensor for example is 20 to 30MB in raw or 10MB in high quality jpeg. If you were to store that many frames for video, that would be 240MB to 720MB per second. No SD card can write that fast and the amount of information that would have to be processed by the image processing ...


3

As far as lenses, the 50mm f/1.8 or f/1.4 (depending on your budget) might be good choices for the portraits. I'm not sure if these will give you the focal length you need for your videos though. If you want to have more choice (and have an even bigger budget) then you may consider the 17-55 f/2.8. Regarding your intention to record long videos, you should ...


3

There are many reasons any given camera's images can become less sharp over time. I doubt you're going to get a solid confirmation, as it would be incredibly difficult to isolate this from other sources of sharpness reduction/variation, outside of perhaps a DxOMark laboratory (with controlled conditions, several brand new cameras, known-good lenses, etc). ...


3

More generally, you'll find that most cameras which are primarily stills cameras will be limited to 30 minutes of video. This is due to EU regulations which mean that anything which can record longer than 30 minutes is a "video camera" and attracts a higher rate of duty. Panasonic are a notable exception to this in that they produce separate EU and non-EU ...


2

On the cheap, the Olymnpus PEN E-PL1 can be an option: Ability to shoot telephoto and wide-angle shots - YES Ability to shoot for slow-motion (If fps can be configured, then great!) - NO (But I have a Casio EX-FH100 and the slowmo at 400 fps is mind boggling) However, shooting this camera with the Diorama art filter on gives the video a stop motion/time ...


2

Assuming that you are, in fact, looking for a still camera that can shoot video, this is a tough combination of requirements. I'm not sure if you're going to find one camera that does all these things. The just-announced Nikon D3100 may be one of the best fits out there, though it's a little North of your budget. There are a few other options that are ...


2

Just load it into any video editing software such as Adobe Premiere Pro and adjust the clip speed. (Windows default Live Movie Maker does not allow you to do that but if I remember correctly you can do it in iMovie on the Mac) After you adjust the speed export the movie as 24fps video.


2

This is called conforming. You can do this with ffmpeg - a couple of examples: http://www.hdslr-cinema.com/news/workflow/convert-between-framerates/ http://www.tedsimbajon.com/Blog/TechBlogExploded.php?id=70


2

Aliasing (and therefore moire, a type of aliasing) is a problem for almost all Canon DLSRs (as well as other manufacturers). The root cause is line skipping, whereby in order to get the necessary framerate only every third line of pixels is read from the chip. If you have fine detail that is about the same size as a line of pixels then as the camera moves ...


2

As we all speculate here, it is very probable that the output video is quite the same, or as @Itai put it, the differences will probably be negligible. However, there can be a difference induced by the fact that the 7D has double the processing power than the 60D, even when the bitrate is the same. Video compression is based on encoding of differences of ...


2

This is certainly a false premise. There is no significant difference between the two unless you are causing the difference with the equipment or processing. One is not more beautiful than the other of course. I have read about some professional photographers starting to pull single frames from 4k video that look very comparable to DSLR still shots. The ...


1

As far as I know (after researching this quite a bit at work) there is no DSLRs with a proper time stamping ability. And no DSLRs with a time sync out put. Hopefully someone can prove me wrong in this.


1

I think for practical purposes, the fact that they essentially use the same sensor and record at the same bit rate and resolution and that the only significant differences between the two models are not really related to video (auto-focus doesn't apply to manual-focus video), I would say it's going to be difficult to choose one over the other. Obviously if ...


1

This should have been a comment to the post by @thomasrutter, but I can't comment yet (lacking reputation). Your bullet point about MJPEG versus AVC is not entirely correct. It is true that MPEG-4 Part 10 (AVC /H.264) usually doesn't record every frame as an I-frame (key / full frame). There is nothing in the specification that prohibits this though, and ...


1

NTSC pixel aspect ratio is 9:10. So you need to crop images to the right image aspect-ratio considering the pixel aspect-ratio. Which is crop to 4:3 ratio and then resize to 720x480 without constraining proportions. Once the pixel aspect-ratio is taken into account this gives a 4:3 image that fills an NTSC screen.


1

In reading many of the blogs on this issue of dropped frames, and relating these to the kind of filming I have been doing I notice that the problem occurs when flying the camera from ambient dark to bright light, like going from outdoors to indoors, or vice versa. As someone suggested, the auto adjustments to ISO seem to create some sort of overload to the ...



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