Incense

by Bart Arondson

submit your photo


Hall of Fame
View past winners from this year

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

19

If you're not using a polarizer, try that first - it will often help to cut through some of the haze. Heres a link with an example close to what you want even: http://www.dslrtips.com/workshops/How_to_use_polarizing_filters/reduce_haze_deep_blue_sky.shtml


17

Sometimes a polarizer helps cut through haze. Otherwise, you can tweak the contrast/brightness in the camera if you want the jpegs to be better, or do it in the RAW program you use. 3rd option is the embrace the smog and make it part of your composition to tell the story. You could make a series to bring attention to problems with pollution and sell them as ...


15

I usually use this technique for pictures taken through windows, but I think it works here, too. In GIMP, I go to Colors | Curves and change the slope of the curve to use all of the available color information: I like to set the new start/end points for the curve to where the little black line along the bottom of the curves starts and ends. Usually ...


12

Really there is no substitute for clean air. If you know when the air is clean and you want the look it gives, shoot at those times: Early morning because the air warms up and lifts particles. On colder days. After a downpour as you said. Obviously sometimes you have to shoot around a specific time. In those cases, you can do some adjustments that help: ...


10

Because the effect of the haze gets stronger as objects get more distant, it really adds depth to an image, as long as you have nearby objects which are less affected, midrange objects and distant objects. The further objects will get more and more faded. This can work to your advantage if you can find situations where there are a series of mountains ...


8

In addition to using a polarizer, and maybe photoshopping your image I would recommend waiting for the right weather. Haze is often minimized after a storm or strong wind has cleared airborne particles. Look for high pressure immediately following a front. If the high sets in for too long haze builds up due to lack of wind. See also this question: How to ...


8

As has been mentioned here a few times, a UV/Haze filter or a Polarizing filter will help mitigate the effects of haze. There are quite a wide variety of UV/Haze and Polarizing filters, and there are several other topics here on Photo.SE that discuss them, their pros/cons, etc. so I won't go into that here. To take a different tack than everyone else, ...


7

I always use a polarizer when shooting landscapes. This helps straighten the light and "clean up" the haze. Utilizing the zone system is also helpful in increasing dynamic range. I find that "haze" is highest during the middle of the day, when the sun is closest to its zenith. Shooting during magic hour will give you less Rayleigh Scatter AND will provide ...


6

You should be able to decrease the haze a bit using a polarizer or haze filter. Using polarizing filters to cut through haze and deepen blue skies UV, Skylight and Haze Filters Cambridge in Color: Filters Additional Information on Haze filters A haze filter absorbs a greater about of UV light than a normal UV filter can. For Tiffen Haze filters: ...


6

UPDATE: After having more time to look at this, i've added a variant at the bottom. Personally, i like add an HDR Toning or similar step to the process; not strictly for the blue haze, but it seems to bring out details better when lost in haze. This assumes the photo makes it easy or possible to compensate for typical HDR problems (grain, ghosts, other ...


5

Here are some possible ideas. Shoot at different times of day! The middle of the day, with the sun high in the sky, is often not a good time to get landscapes, because you get virtually no shadows. Your example image has no depth. Try taking pictures late or early in the day to get more shadows. If you take a shot really late in the day when shadows ...


5

Did you mean something like this? This is a JPEG straight out of camera (resized and sharpened). To get such haze, light source (in this case, sun) was positioned so it was just off the edge - so the haze is just a result of light falling into lens.


5

Despite the wide use of wide angle lenses (sorry no pun intended) for landscape photography, they are not the only viable solution for landscape photography. I highly recommend trying out a telephoto lens for landscape shots like this. With a wide angle, you bring in everything, both foreground, bright sky, and everything inbetween. A lot of times, these ...


4

The contrast issue can be solved either with a gradual ND filter which will darken only the sky, or by simply using layer masks in postprocessing to apply different tone curves to foreground, background and the sky. You can even join multiple exposures if camera's dynamic range is not enough. If you don't do this too much carefully, you might end up with ...


4

Under Rayleigh scattering the sky will look greener and then yellower the closer you get to the sun, however with the sun high in the sky I don't think that's what is happening here. I think pollution is a more likely cause, especially as it seems to exist close to the horizon. Filters (polarizing/UV) may make the sky a darker, richer tone, I'm not sure they ...


4

The other way to do this is with levels. In Photoshop, you add a levels adjustment layer (it will be similar in GIMP) and then, in each channel (red, green, and blue) you pull both ends in to where the histogram starts for each respective end. For example: The end result of doing all three channels is: Pretty similar to the one that drewbenn posted, ...


3

When I was in China I noticed that the people there (in Beijing and Guilin) liked coloured lights. They were everywhere on the busy streets in the city. My suggestion is to shoot at night when the coloured lights give you an interesting effect through the smog.


3

It depends on what you mean by "haze". You will get something one might call "haze" by using a very soft lens, including possibly a zone plate (which uses diffraction rather than refractive glass lenses). Shooting directly into bright light, particularly with older lenses, will produce a "veiled", low-constrast look which could also by thought of as hazy. ...


3

To fight haze in photos you use something called local contrast. The clarity preset of the equalizer module in darktable is a local contrast processing tool. I made a quick load of your image, used levels tool to correct the range then applied clarity to bring out details (that is, to fight the haze). I just made a quick fix as seen in the image below, and ...


3

Here's my very quick try of what I described in a comment to @jrista's answer: Again, just a quick and dirty attempt. You should do it with more attention.


3

You might want to consider a yellow or warming filter on the lens, and as mentioned elsewhere, take the picture into black and white if you can't control the colors. Ansel Adams worked a lot in this kind of environment (in black and white) and he actually used red filters at times to block out the blue haze. Another tip from Mr. Adams (not having anything ...


3

Given a couple of your problems are with color you could try removing that problem from the equation and see how it looks in B&W or IR. The foliage in the foreground could look good in IR and either way with some dodging and burning you could get some great contrast in the foreground, mountain and sky.


3

I would also consider enhancing the composition. Maybe use a longer focal length to compress the perspective. If you want to stick with the wider angle maybe try to make the foreground more interesting. The bushes in the foreground are currently very repetitive and take away the attention from the mountains. Maybe try to find something that frames the ...


3

ADDED: The Canon appears to be capable of better results than you are getting when it is in its original condition. Given that you said that cleaning the lens made a significant difference and that it is about 6 years old and you said the area is extremely dusty. and the lens has the potential to pump dust into the body interior I think the effort ...


2

You can get good results reducing haze by playing with the unsharp mask filter in the image editing software of your choice (Photoshop, GIMP, etc). Try using a small amount with a large radius. You may want to use a selection to apply this only to the sky area if you find that it affects the foreground in a way you do not like. It's not a magic bullet but ...


2

A polarizer has its greatest effect on the sky around 45 degrees away from the sun. If you look at the sky on a clear day, the part of the sky that's already the deepest blue is also the part that's going to be deepened the most by a polarizer. If you look when the sun is nearly overhead, you'll notice that next to the horizon, the blue fades to almost ...


2

Apart from filters (which are the best way to minimise haze, chills' answer covers that base nicely) anything you can do to minimize noise (get as much light in as possible (e.g with a longer exposure), expose to the right) will help recover contrast lost to haze when post processing. This is because increasing contrast in post will increase noise, and the ...


2

I see the entire image as having a blue cast. You may or may not like this. If you don't you can neutralize it using white balance or by correcting one channel as @drewbenn did. However, removing the blue cast is only part of the issue. You're looking for more local contrast. That masquerades under different names, but "clarity" and "definition" are the two ...


2

Well given that focus and detail are closely related to (local) contrast, higher contrast light ought to give you more apparent detail, while haze, by definition, is going to give you reduced contrast and less apparent detail. I would say subjectively that a low contrast, out of focus background might produce what we would call a "creamy" bokeh more than a ...


2

It's not just a matter of the lens and sensor: the camera also does a lot of processing that changes the look of the image. Increasing the contrast and saturation for the Canon – try 'vivid' mode, or a custom colour setting – will go a long way to having it match the iPhone. I downloaded both and processed the Canon photo with Snapseed (I'm on an iPad at the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible