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by Bart Arondson

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26

This is my low-light hand-held shooting technique: Assume a stable posture, usually not leaning in any direction. Support the camera's weight with the left hand. Grip firmly with the right but let the index-finder loose. Press the shutter-release halfway and wait for a focus-lock (When using AF) Breath in Exhale Gently press the shutter-release fully. Wait ...


14

Some "tricks" Ninja breathing, as above. Learn to hold breath at critical moment. Body braced in as stable a position as you can get it. "Think like a rock" :-) ie elbows in against body, head pulled down against body, "hunched" posture feet placed consciously firmly and maybe slightly spread. Brace against something !!! - Lamp post railing, corner of ...


11

No, a higher resolution sensor does not increase the difficulty of handheld shooting. It does mean that is is more difficult to realize the full potential of the higher resolution sensor, but that doesn't mean the results are worse than they would be with a lower resolution sensor.


6

A big reason is that it just makes getting the shot sequence consistent and accurate. In general, you're looking to keep the vertical plane level through the whole sequence and move along the horizontal plane in smooth, even, steps. A panoramic head is simply going to make that easier to do with less effort and risk of a muffed shot at all kinds of focal ...


6

Maybe Joe McNallys - Da Grip or a String-Tripod


5

In addition to the fine answers from the other users, there's one more thing you can do: Take many pictures and throw away the blurry ones. Camera shake is random movement in random amounts, and if you take enough pictures you should be lucky enough to find at least one where there is no shake. Depending on the situation, "enough pictures" can mean anywhere ...


5

I saw this Joe McNally video a while back and found that it helped me a good deal, especially as I have a mild hand tremor. Also relaxing, watching your breathing and making sure you roll your finger over the shutter button rather than press or stab at it makes a big difference.


5

Short answer: No. Since D7000 is APS-C, it has a sensor size of 1/2 the area of D800, which is full frame. A full frame sensor with the same pixel density (not pixel size, but pixel-to-pixel distance) as D7000 in full frame would equal 32 megapixels. Since D800 is 36 megapixels, it will be marginally more difficult to get "all pixels perfect" with the same ...


4

Not at all, and I have both. HOWEVER - You are also working with a much larger sensor, in theory, given the same (ish) field of view, IE a 50mm on the D7000 and an 80mm on the D800, the affect of an identical movement would create a more noticeable blur on the image, when viewed at pixel level.


4

Set an automatic timer Typically you set an automatic timer to try to jump in the picture, but I've found that if I set my auto time to 2s I can press the shutter button, and then wait 2s for the camera to take the picture itself without me introducing another "shake" by pressing the shutter button. It doesn't work all the time (with the 2s pause the scene ...


4

One way to reduce impact of inherent unsteadiness would be to work towards shorter shutter time - use a faster aperture (lens), higher ISO and/or more lighting. That would also reduce motion blur resulting from subject's movement or wind during a longer exposure. A couple of times I've caught myself boneheadedly sticking to ISO 200 and shooting several ...


4

A string tripod might help you out here.


4

Do you have any suggestions on how I can manually focus with the three stop light loss without losing the flexibility of working handheld? If you'll excuse the trivial level of the answer - which works well for me - I on occasion use an LED torch for night lighting for focusing purposes either when the flash focus assist light is ineffective or I'm not ...


4

It's not trivial to calculate from scratch the amount of light required (as you have no idea how much is absorbed, reflected etc. and it will vary according to how the lights are positioned). What you can do, is find out what shutter speed your camera meter is suggesting currently and work it out from there. You'll want to aim for 1/2f where f is the focal ...


3

Leica manuals have some instructions on this, but it basically boils down to not holding on to the lens, pretty much as you initially described. In portrait mode, rotate the camera so that the shutter release is at the top and your right hand index finger is on it. Hold the other side of the camera at the bottom corner with your left hand. If you need to ...


3

This is going to sound stupid (and I'm not a professional photographer) but I've been in your situation. I try to place my camera on an (ideally near-flat) object, lower my center-of-gravity (typically by spreading my legs or crouching down), and press the shutter after I exhale (and just before I inhale). Many times I wish I had a tripod when interesting ...


3

BRASSF Breathe (take a few breaths; you don't want your muscles starved of oxygen) Relax (let the last breath out about halfway; you don't want your muscles straining to keep your lungs inflated) Aim Squeeze (take up the slack in the shutter button; i.e. it should be a hair from taking the picture) STOP (wait for your viewfinder picture to settle on your ...


3

Lean against a wall or other solid object Tuck your elbows into your side, don't hold them out to the sides Support the weight of the camera from underneath with one hand Take deep breath and slowly exhale Squeeze the shutter release, don't stab at it Use burst mode and take 2-3 shots, one is likely to be sharper than the rest


3

Don't forget to limit your caffeine intake.


3

tr;dr 1. The lens focal length matters more in practice. 2. There won't be more blur detectable when looking at a full-screen image, but since the D800 can resolve finer detail, it can also resolve smaller motion blur (if you're pixel peeping). If you are talking about the difficulty of having no motion blur visible at the pixel level (not full image), ...


3

Using that gear, you'll probably be able to capture something. But in-focus and not blurred due to camera shake and subject movement? No, I don't think so. Fireflies are just too weak as light sources. If you did manage to catch them the result would just be a bunch of pale green dots, not very impressive without context. Just lean back and enjoy the ...


2

I find that resting my camera against my head works really well (and it's something I've never seen suggested), even just eye-to-the-viewfinder works well. Of course you need to remember not to move while the viewfinder goes dark though! If I want to take long exposure (second or more) photos without a tripod, then I tend to rest my camera on my shoe, or ...


2

If tripod is too heavy, monopod and Gorillapod can work. Personally I have found monopod to be superior to Gorillapod, and both are of pretty similar weight; but the monopod is longer, while Gorillapod fits into pocket of outdoor jacket. So, most likely you need multiple devices and pick one of them per the situation. You might also want to experiment with ...


2

Two methods I find useful: Shooter: cradle camera in the sitting position, like one would a rifle: sit, with thighs in front and near your chest, cross legs a bit if more comfortable. Rest camera on knees and shoot away. Downside, you are low to the ground, but rock steady. Strap method: This one works when you think it shouldn't. Get a piece of nylon ...


2

Just a few final suggestions: Try using the strap and loop it around your shoulder then elbow to get some tension on it, it's quite difficult to explain but you're basically wanting to have to 'pull' the camera down, just don't pull too hard. Remember shake will be increased if you have your shutter speed set to less than the focal length you're at. So if ...


2

This applies to hand held photography when you cannot use another object to stabalise your camera. Watch your breathing, if you have time, take a deep breath once you have done that hold it and release the shutter, Make sure you are holding the camera with one hand and the other is cupping the lens. Its also a good idea to make sure your feet are shoulder ...


2

A panorama head is the most useful when your panorama includes both near and far objects. The reason for this is that the effect of rotating accurately around the nodal point becomes more important if your objects are near. The second reason for panorama heads as I see it, is that older software (10 Years ago-ish) did not include the possibility of ...


2

Once you get into the Macro range, a lot of the bets are off for more conventional rules of thumb. Because your subject is so close, the depth of field (DoF) is razor thin at wider apertures. Even when stopped down to f/8 or so there will still be plenty of bokeh in the background for anything that is any distance at all behind your subject. With the ...


2

There isn't a right or even recommended setting for shutter speed or aperture in this situation. Aperture should be determined specifically based on the amount of background blur you want. If you don't care about the background blur, you would want to set it somewhere in the middle to reach ideal sharpness (I'm not sure the ideal on that lens, though the ...


2

If you are carrying a backpack, or some scarf for example (you can take of your shirt of as weel) it's very easy to put the machine on top of it and point it to your target. After you release the camera because it's pointing to where you want, the scarf (for example) might let the camera move a bit, as the camera sinks into it or moves into a more balanced ...



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