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14

There are now 17 digital cameras with GPS. It's a simple search on Neocamera: http://www.neocamera.com/search_camera.php?gps=1&by=feature If you look at the Refine Results column (the orange box) in the above page, you'll see the break down by category (9 compact, 1 large, 1 SLD, 2 DSLR and 4 ultra-compact at this time). Nikon is still missing from ...


9

JOBO makes a device called the photoGPS that attaches to your hotshoe and records your location every time you take a picture. Later, you use software to match the photos with the locations. I haven't used it, so I can't comment on how well it works, but it seems like it should be pretty camera brand-independent.


8

Couple of reasons: GPS suck in a lot of battery power. Mostly because unlike the camera itself they need to keep running (you can't just turn it on when there is a click because the gps needs to find the co-ordinates and initialization takes time) Low ROI: With apps like GeoTag for smartphones, its relatively easy to tag photos. Most of the celebrity ...


8

The answer is simpler than you think. GPS is not included because the manufacturer does not feel it would sell more cameras. It's the same reason they skimp on camera straps. If it does not sell more cameras, it is not needed, the manufacturer can sell it for less - even just a bit less - or pocket the difference. Personally I could not care less about ...


8

Photoshop Lightroom does this with the "map" tab. Here is an example of my shots mapped with it: You can download a free trial from Adobe or purchase it for $100-150USD.


7

I personally use my Android device to record a track and then tag the images in Lightroom as discussed here: http://www.earthboundlight.com/phototips/adobe-lightroom-geotagging.html Now that I have been doing that I can see why you want to get a device:-) The nikon mailing list has discussed this before and several people have used a di-gps device: ...


7

I like to have date and times on photos reflect local times and date at the location. Unlike another respondent, I like to be able to search for a photo taken "at about 3pm on the Thursday afternoon when I was in Xian" and, while there are other ways of cataloguing and ordering, being able to search on local date and time is a bonus. Travel from NZ involves ...


6

Another solution is setting you camera and GPS to the GMT timezone and never change it. Then you can geotag your photos and time-adjust the GPS time-staps. Geosetter is an alternative geotagger that can do this: You can also add or subtract hours/minutes/seconds if the GPS and the Camera aren't perfectly synchronized.


5

Nikon has a special GPS unit, the GP-1. In urban areas (where there are Wi-Fi networks in range) you could use EyeFi Geo/Explore/Pro memory/WiFi cards which perform geotagging automatically using WPS data when uploading the data.


5

They cleverly hid this functionality, to do what you want: Select Metadata menu -> Manage My Places Add your new 'My Place' Select the photos you want to geotag Select Metadata menu -> Assign location Pick from your remembered locations or use a new one Voila, and in the future you can just use steps 3-5 to assign that location to any further photos.


5

Lightroom 4 will look at GPS data and pulls Google maps to show you where you've taken your pictures and lets you search/filter by location, among other things.


4

It's a niche feature that requires extra hardware (which increases manufacturing and warranty costs). It makes camera interface more confusing. It eats battery and there are privacy concerns, so many users might choose to keep it switched off even if they had the feature (but why would they still want to pay for it?). An average point-and-shoot user ...


4

Some hints: Actually, there aren't that many time zones in Central Europe. Most likely you won't be crossing multiple time zones that often. If you first import each time zone into a separate project, and then follow the instructions here, you should be fine. Any constant offset between photo time stamps and GPS time stamps is fine – indeed, Aperture ...


4

For a camera that's going to be used during hiking and sporting, drop and weather resistance might be beneficial. You can find those cameras by selecting the "Waterproof" options. "Going out and having fun" suggests looking for good light gathering ability for better quality of low-light shots and faster shutter speeds in action shots. This is usually ...


4

I have not tried this, but it appears that GeoSetter supports visualizing the heading data from GPS data if the GPS device recorded it. Optionally, you could add this data manually after the fact. From the change log: Optional synchronizing of heading data when synchronizing with GPS track files More notes and some screenshots for the feature are ...


4

My cameras (Nikon D300s and Canon S95) have the capacity to use time zones. For instance at the moment I'm in Brazil, and rather than change the time I've left them on GMT (or UTC if you're being modern about it) and changed the time zone to -3. In the last 4 months I've been through three time zones. Part of my work involves photography and having the right ...


4

I use OpenGPS Tracker. It is free and open source and doesn't steal your data. You can get it at the link, on Google's Appstore, or through FDroid. I then start tracking, it will ask for a name of the track, and at the end of the day/journey, I will stop tracking and then go on share. On clicking share, a tool comes up, where you can choose between KMZ ...


4

To convert a decimal longitude or latitude to degrees (minutes and seconds), simply take the first, whole, number and use it as the degrees. Then multiply the remainder after the decimal point by 60 to get minutes. Continue multiplying the remainder of the minutes by 60 to get seconds of degrees. Your example of -79.06782 would then be: -79 degrees .06782 ...


3

Having done a lot of work (4000+waypoints) w/ separate camera + GPS on botanical surveys, after-the-fact correlation between a GPS waypoint and a camera picture is a pain. If you don't really care whether the spot in question is at point X or 100 feet away, it's not too hard. But otherwise, it is very easy to forget which waypoint goes with which picture ...


3

The gyroscope in an iPhone doesn't actually let you track the direction the camera was facing at the time of a shot. All it does it track motion--it has no frame of reference to determine what point of the compass the camera is actually facing. The "digital compass" in the iPhone 3G S onwards can give some idea of that, except that it's designed to be used ...


3

If you are shooting in the wilderness, then consider a dedicated GPS unit. Garmin devices are great (map format aside). I used GPSmap 60Cx with Sirf Star III chipset, and it was reliable and precise even in narrow mountain valleys/gorges. Garmin doesn't advertise which chipsets they use anymore, but you can find this information from the third parties. I ...


3

My personal solution was to buy one of these: http://www.i-gotu.com/ I tried to find the cheapest thing I could, and this works! :D Adding details asked in comment: Battery life is approximately 30 hours. Recharges via proprietary-connector-to-usb-A cable, included. Comes with geotagging software, which I didn't use since it's Windows® only. There is ...


3

Answering my own question on behalf of a friend who showed me Geotag. This is a Java software that can show you any number of pictures on a map in a browser winder. No need to upload anything, it fetches the maps from Google Maps and uses a local http server to display them. So, it is one possibility that matches what I am looking for. It can show the ...


3

Yes, you could use a sync cord (or an optical slave) with a hot shoe adapter to provide another hot shoe for your GPS unit. Since the GPS unit doesn't have camera brand specific models, we can deduct it does not need TTL info, just the basic flash signal. Based on this thread it seems using a sync cord will not disable popup flash on your camera, but you ...


3

I'd love to see a GPS in more (all!) cameras, but that's obviously not happening. My wife had a Nikon P6000, which has a GPS in it. The battery life because of the GPS was horrid. Even though you could adjust how often the GPS would activate, it sucked the battery dry very quickly. Yes, it could be turned off, but if you wanted to use it... well, you should ...


3

It is the offset where the GPS Info is. You have to jump to that offset to read GPS info. EXIF info works the same way. See on the previous line in your example: ExifIFDPointer: 2790


3

You need to convert the format, which is simply a floating point number of degrees, into the separate parts for degrees and minutes. And it looks like it wants latitude measurements with the N (north) or S (south). Your example converts to -79° 4' 4.1514" I'm not sure exactly what Bridge wants, probably -79,4.069 I know that Adobe Lightroom 4's "MAP" ...


3

Geotag may work for you. It's written in Java and is compatible with a number of OS's. You can even run it from the linked site without actually installing it on your system (insofar as a Java app isn't installed when you run it...) I would recommend that whatever package you decide on that you make backup copies of your image directories until you're ...


3

Gpicsync is an open source software that can run in Windows, Linux, or Mac OS. It includes a tool to export your geotagged pictures into a KMZ file. You can then use this KMZ file to create a map in Google Maps (and probably other mapping applications).


3

You can use ExifTool to generate a GPS track from a bunch of geotagged photos. ExifTool is a command line program, available free for Windows, Mac OS or Linux. See this page for instructions on Inverse Geotagging. That explains how to generate a track in GPX or KML format.



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