Alley in Pisa, Italy

by Lars Kotthoff

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23

The traditional cheap solution is a bag of beans.


8

To some degree you can adjust the legs or bend it so the camera faces where you want it. But let's say you have it wrapped around a railing and want to aim the camera elsewhere. With a small ball head you can turn the camera easily. If you have to adjust the legs, it may take a lot of trial and error to position the camera just right. Or if you have it ...


8

Other options for uneven surfaces which I like a lot are these ones: Ballpod THE pod RiceQ (their online shop is pretty bad, if you need international shipping I'd suggest to use amazon.de)


6

You are loosing quite a lot: -Height -Stability -Smooth panning (video) -Easily angling the head to acute angles (with a heavy camera the gorilla would/could droop) BUT you are gaining: -Portability -Attach-ability (to things) It's a trade off, so I have both. I also use the gorillapod to mount a flash gun on, TBH its more useful to me this way than ...


6

No, but a ball head does offer real advantages Using a gorillapod without a ball head is a practical option. As you point out, you can use the inherent flexibility of the tripod to angle the head in any direction. However, if you add a ball head then you can point the camera in the right direction with much greater speed and accuracy. This may be ...


5

Look at the Joby website. They are all different! Pay attention to the color of the joints and if yours has a joint above where the legs join or not. If there is a built-in head, look at it and compare as they are three distinct ones. It is not easy to see but the focus joints has rings which are metallic instead of grey. The specs are available there too. ...


4

As a Gorillapod user (SLR version) with a small Nikon DSLR and Sony 5R, I noticed that the camera shake comes mainly from the tripod being less than ideally attached to the pole/branch/bar/whatever. This is not easily fixed, because most times the Gorillapod cannot be ideally set up with no camera shake (especially if you need to adjust it and recompose a ...


3

A decent quality tripod will be more stable than a Gorillapod. Things that tend to be major issues with the Gorillapod will tend to be more minor issues with the tripod. Extremely long exposures will allow you to open and close the shutter using the camera's shutter release button without creating enough blur to be a problem. With the less stable Gorillapod ...


3

To a large extent, this depends on your camera (and lens), how uneven the surface is and what you mean by "too much money", but the obvious answer here is a Gorillapod or equivalent (other brands are available).


3

I would recommend a ball head, it's very hard to do minute adjustments without the ball head. I was using a gorillapod without ball head, but later bought a ballhead. It's very easy make composition corrections with ballhead and also to go for portrait. Joby sells a Gorillapod with ball head ...


2

I have used the GorillaPod SLR (the one below the SLR zoom, so lower capacity) with my Canon EOS 550D + 18-55mm IS kit lens, and had no issues with stability (less than a kg combined). My GorillaPod is almost 5 years old now, but still going strong. I also have the 55-250mm IS lens, but haven't used it with the GorillaPod yet. The main concern I see when ...


2

It's fine for a railing or something you can really wrap it around well. Something like a tree trunk or large vertical pole, not so much. It's well built, the camera wouldn't fall off, but it could slip down if there's not much friction to hold it in place. Edit: the GorillaPod SLR-Zoom is rated at 3kg (6.5 lbs). My D90, which is a heavy camera, with ...


2

yes, yes and yes. I bought a gorillapod for my canon 550D and it was useless - I was spending more time adjusting it than taking pictures. if I'm honest, I had read reviews saying this before buying it, but I thought "it can't be that bad...otherwise they wouldn't sell any". Actually, it was that bad! I've stopped using it. i didn't even try to buy the ...


2

The camera + tripod has a centre of mass. The setup is the most stable if the stabilizing points are the farther apart from this centre of mass. Stabilizing point = that point which is being fixed in space. This can be the end of legs standing on the floor, but also it can be something you tie the leg around, etc. So in general: put the legs apart, fix them ...


2

It seems that you already have both beanbag and gorillapod. If you can't bring both, I would prefer the gorillapod over the beanbag for the following reasons: Height The gorillapod is higher while the beanbag can only be placed on the ground. When there is a higher surface, the gorillapod can still be placed on it, so it is almost always higher than the ...


2

One other approach is to use a remote release. Basically you're decoupling the physical action of pressing the button (and hence jiggling the camera) from the shutter opening. A timer delay does this 'temporally', while a remote release does this 'spatially'. Even an old-fashioned cable-release will help, if your camera supports it.


1

I often got away with using the camera bag and/or the lens cap. And small objects (rocks) around can be moved as well. For shutter speeds up to a second, I also lean my camera against poles or walls, locking the hand grip against it. For time lapse you probably don't care so much for long exposures, you just want no motion in between successive exposures. ...


1

I have not had very good luck with gorillapods, great to hold a flash or two, but not for my cameras. This is likely due to the fact that I tend to shoot with heavier cameras and glass (and I am picky about my tripods). I have had good luck with "bean bags" (I actually use rice), packed relatively tight and heavy on a steady more or less flat surface you can ...


1

It's important to note that tripod/head weight ratings are typically not directly related to camera weight. Confusing but true! The problem is with the weight distribution of your camera and lens and how the tripod/head area positioned. A small/short lens on the camera is going to have a very different center of balance than a big/long lens on the camera. ...


1

I use a mount called the Glif for my iPhone. It is essentially a small holder for the phone that has a standard tripod mount on the bottom of it. You can see more of it here Glif website. I think your best option is to get any adapter that is designed specifically for your phone and that adds a 1/4 mount for a standard tripod.


1

I entrusted my DSLR to one when attaching it to street sign posts and a 19th storey balcony railing when I was on holiday a while back. It didn't give me any concerns about the legs slipping although I was careful to have the strap looped around my arm when mounting and dismounting the gorillapod. -edit: This was using the kit 18-55 lens, not heavy at all, ...



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