Alley in Pisa, Italy

by Lars Kotthoff

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49

Yes. There is development in four areas: computer design, material science, features, and finally a category I'm going to call "not better just different". Computer Design Lens design has always been a mix of art and science. In the first part of the previous century, art was clearly primary (even for scientific lens designers). Now, lens design software ...


29

There may be a handle that lets you open the window, have you tried that? :) Other than removing the problem that way, what you are doing is pretty much the best option. By putting the lens close to the window, you are getting any dirt on the window out of focus. Every part of the image usually passes through every part of the front lens, which means that ...


28

You probably didn't find much because you were searching on the wrong term. The phenomenon isn't commonly called 'The Newton Effect,' it's usually called 'Newton's Rings.' Briefly, Newton's Rings are an optical property of physics that occurs between two pieces of glass when one piece of glass is convex and the other piece is flat and there is airspace ...


15

When it comes to glass it's all about lighting direction. You want to make sure that when you look at the picture through the camera neither the reflection of the lightsource or anything lit by your lightsource is visible. Hold up, I'll draw a diagram: Glass and other shiny objects reflect light back in one direction (like a ball bouncing off a wall). ...


13

Speaking from the world of amateur astronomy, there's quite a bit of development happening with lenses. Eyepieces and objectives are all using new, exotic glass and computing resources to design well-corrected refractive devices. New glass mixes don't come along very often and the proper effort to better mate the shapes and characteristics still requires ...


12

Try a rubber lens hood. here is an example from B&H Screw it onto your lens, then literally place the hood onto the glass window. Get the most flexible one you can find, as it will allow you a slight angle against the glass for a touch better composition. The hood blocks all the reflections and extraneous light from behind, and as a result the ...


12

I'd recommend reading the book Light: Science and Magic by Hunter, Fuqua, and Biver. It has a whole chapter dedicated to lighting glass. From memory, it says that with glass it's lighting the edges correctly that is important in coveying the qualities of glass. (No connection to the book by the way, other than being a satisfied reader).


10

Those look like features of the glass windows that are being revealed by the polarizer. I don't think there is any way to avoid them other than by not using the polarizer, or being careful with the filter orientation and lighting. I've observed this effect many times in car windows. I can't find a technical explanation but I imagine it's to do with stresses ...


10

A few shooting-through-window tips: shoot with the lens at a slight angle instead of being directly perpendicular to the window if you know you're going to be shooting through a window, wear dark clothing, which will reflect less in the glass as you mentioned, get your lens as close to the glass as possible in Photoshop or other post-processing, adjust the ...


8

I think you should try to reduce glare before taking the shot via a polarizer filter. Afterwards it's difficult to know what was behind the reflection as the image doesn't have that information...


8

I'd recommend option 2: scan the picture in its frame or take a picture of the picture. If the picture itself can be saved maybe also depends on the used paper.


8

Sunrise and sunset can be spectacular times for such shots: the reflections become an interesting photographic element rather than something to be eliminated: 1/50 sec f/6.3 (17mm) ISO 400 (no polarizer) Just meter on the part of the image you want appropriately exposed. (I used spot metering near the door frame.) The glass on the first two storeys is ...


8

I had a similar problem to shoot fish in an aquarium. The trick I discovered is to get one of those inexpensive flexible rubber lens hoods. Attach it to your lens, and then 'smush' your camera and lens right up against the glass, ensuring the rubber lens hood is flush against the glass. This then cuts out all reflected light. This was taken through glass ...


7

If you look at the exif of this photo on flickr you will see a low aperture and high iso and probably just overexposed it a bit. Flash produce a different effect than this. A weak light source(es) far off gives the feel and with longish exposure gives bloom; high iso lowers the dynamic range and possibly a wider aperture lens gives some blur. Obviously the ...


7

From my experience, when it comes to product photography, in order to make impressive images you really cannot end up using the available light - at least without modification. First thing I'd rule out is the on-camera flash (either built in or external). Forget about using it unless you want a flat and blah image. Then you probably want to take care for ...


7

Stan Rogers and floqui covered problems of framing without glass - but I want to offer another alternative - frame without glass anyway, let me explain. If those prints are one-of-a-kind or in any way can't be reproduced (or can't be reproduced without a lot of darkroom work) than this is irrelevant but if those can just be re-printed than you can trade ...


6

You can reduce glare in post if it's a fairly constant tone, for example the white of the trellis. This is done by darkening / increasing the contrast to match the rest of the background and shifting the colour if necessary. However if there is detail in the reflection like there is in the area which covers the girl's face then it's going to be a lot harder ...


6

Soft light is going to work better for you than harsh light (you get less strong reflections and the contrast will be more manageable) so either early morning, early evening or an overcast day would be best. A circular polarising filter will help control reflections: you may find you need to try different locations until you find an angle where it's really ...


6

Glass framing will protect your print from various effect First of all UV (which are present in the sunlight but also in smaller amount in most of the modern lightning). with time UV alter the print color but they are also aging the paper itself Stain from the environment (You know this black spot from the fly or the little drop of saliva when your old ...


5

20 months on - I don't see anyone mentioning a method that helps me in extreme cases. You do have to be more than averagely committed (or obsessed) or to come more than averagely prepared. Use of a dark "hood" over head and camera so you are sealed in your own dark space on your side of the glass will almost completely eliminate the reflections which are ...


5

Use a large aperture! If you get close to the window and focus far away but open the lens as wide as possible (I'm talking like f/1.4 here, not f/3.5) any dirt on the window will blur away, and may not even be visible depending on the subject. Here I focused to infinity then stuck my thumb (which is hopefully a lot larger than the dirt on your windows!) in ...


5

I can't say whether this will work for a print stuck on glass, but I recently had very good success separating a bunch of prints that were stuck to other prints by putting the brick of stuck prints in the freezer for about 1/2 hour. I was floored when it actually worked, but I got every last print unstuck this way.


5

Lighting for glasses is all about angles. The rule is: angle of incidence equals angle of reflection. Typically, the light would be either above or below the subject so that the reflections off the glasses would angle in the desired direction which is away from the lens, like so: This is a two light shot and, while I still need to work on filling in some ...


4

You could try warming the glass in the areas where the print stuck to the glass. Depending on the type of ink, it may not have permanently bonded, and a little heat might go a long way towards loosening the hold between the two. I would take it slowly, and with care, to avoid smearing or bleeding the ink too much. There might be some quality loss regardless, ...


4

This looks like an image that you can never take again, so the issue is not how to improve a retake, but to rescue what information you can. If you could return to the scene under identical outdoor lighting conditions, with the same objects in the background, and from the same location re-shoot the window into an empty unlit room, then you could (a) ...


4

The key to photographing this is about the angle of light(s) used to illuminate the surface of the art. It's all about angles and reflection and it's probably easier to illustrate this (pardon my poor Coreldraw skills). The dotted lines connecting the camera show the angles of direct reflection, so if the lighting is inside those lines, the glare will be ...


4

Bringing down the size and weight of lenses seems to be one of the key areas of focus. E.g., the newer Canon EF 600mm lens with IS is actually lighter than the previous non-IS one (5.4 kg vs 6 kg). At smaller focal lengths, you have diffractive optics being used that make for smaller & lighter lenses like Canon's 400mm f/4 DO & the 70-300mm ...



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