Lightnings taking a ride

by ceinmart

submit your photo


Hall of Fame
View past winners from this year

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

28

The answer will be easy to figure out if you understand a little bit what polarization means. I don't have a polarizing filter to play with, but I do have a physics degree, so here it goes: Light reflected by certain types of surfaces (such as glass or water, but not metal) is partially linearly polarized. Light reflected under a certain angle is fully ...


20

For macro of reflecting things you need a as big as possible lightsource. Best would be a macro tent, but you can improvise with a few pieces of paper and light sources. Just cut one piece of paper in half, form a ring from the two pieces, put them on some other papers and put light sources outside the paper: If the stuff is really reflective, put another ...


18

When it comes to glass it's all about lighting direction. You want to make sure that when you look at the picture through the camera neither the reflection of the lightsource or anything lit by your lightsource is visible. Hold up, I'll draw a diagram: Glass and other shiny objects reflect light back in one direction (like a ball bouncing off a wall). ...


16

The glare effect on the monitor itself is a digitized effect, it is not real. Technically speaking, it is near impossible to get a clear photograph of a computer screen with the image it is displaying like you can see in that Apple example. What is generally done is a photograph of the screen(s) are taken while they are off, and the images that are ...


15

The coin reflects light. With a light shining straight on it, much of it may be reflected straight back at the camera: The first thing to do is move the light to the side and put a dark object where it used to be. The dark object is now reflected in the coin, but that's not noticeable: There are still many specular highlights on the relief and ...


12

tl; dr. Blend a "panorama" from only slightly rotated exposures and make sure no flare is included in the final result. It's not possible to optically remove this type of flare when shooting into the sun (though different lenses have different levels of flare resistance). However, there are other effective ways to get rid of it. What you can do is take ...


11

Any Other advice on increasing the reflection over water surfaces. Specular reflections like you get from water are stronger the lower the angle of incidence. This means when the light is coming almost parallel to the surface and striking a glancing blow. This is easy to achieve under controlled lighting. In natural light this means waiting until the ...


10

Posting some examples will help us identify your problem, but if you're getting distortion because they're wearing very thick, corrective glasses - there's not alot you're going to be able to do. If you're getting odd angles of reflected light, either change the angle of the light by moving the flash or tilting the subject's head. Obviously you can also ...


10

I have done three things in the past to deal with this. Compose the photo in such a way that the lense flare is attractive... that's a great choice for your example above because the sun is IN the photo. Some lenses have an attractive flare (many don't) Use lens hoods, paper, or your hand to block the light that is causing the flare. This works when ...


8

I think you should try to reduce glare before taking the shot via a polarizer filter. Afterwards it's difficult to know what was behind the reflection as the image doesn't have that information...


8

You can get all sorts of interesting shapes and colours when shooting directly into a lightsource like that. All pieces of glass reflect a certain amount of light and transmit a certain amount, so you actually get flare from everything in your scene every time you shoot, only it's usually much dimmer than the rest of the picture so you don't see it. When ...


7

I assume not using the flash is not an option you would consider, obviously that would do it. You can bounce the flash by angling it towards the ceiling or a neutral color wall. That will diffuse the light and reduce the directionality of it. Sometimes this is not an option, such as for a high or colored ceiling. In this case you should probably add a ...


7

Shifting the subject's head or shifting the camera (yourself) are both excellent options. If you run into a situation where you're not able to have the subject change the position or their head, or the camera's angle, a third option is to ask the subject to tilt their glasses a bit (by pushing the rims up off of their ears just a bit). This will angle the ...


7

"Good lighting" for outside pictures is pretty much dusk or dawn. If you're getting a harsh reflection of the sun at this point, you should be able to easily rotate a bit and get the sun out of your frame. In fact, some of the best light is just before the sun rises and just after it sets. There's still plenty of light to shoot with - especially for ...


6

You can reduce glare in post if it's a fairly constant tone, for example the white of the trellis. This is done by darkening / increasing the contrast to match the rest of the background and shifting the colour if necessary. However if there is detail in the reflection like there is in the area which covers the girl's face then it's going to be a lot harder ...


6

A circular polarizing filter will go a long way to eliminate the reflected light from the water. But you might also want to go in the opposite direction, and try to work out a composition that embraces the reflection, rather than eliminate it. For example, longer exposures that turn the glints into something more silky might get you something nice.


5

Have you tried a polarising filter? They reduce glare and reflections generally, so it might well help in your case.


5

Yes, you use a polarising filter for that too. At a specific angle the polarising filter will let through 0% of the reflected light, and 50% of the rest of the light. Turned 90 degrees the filter will let through 100% of the reflected light, and 50% of the rest of the light.


5

Lens flare happens when light internally reflects within the lens itself. There are a few possible sources of internal reflection. You could get it from using a non-digital lens on a digital camera and getting reflection off the sensor (doesn't seem like the case here), you could get it off a filter placed on the front of the lens (light tends to bounce ...


4

This looks like an image that you can never take again, so the issue is not how to improve a retake, but to rescue what information you can. If you could return to the scene under identical outdoor lighting conditions, with the same objects in the background, and from the same location re-shoot the window into an empty unlit room, then you could (a) ...


4

The key to photographing this is about the angle of light(s) used to illuminate the surface of the art. It's all about angles and reflection and it's probably easier to illustrate this (pardon my poor Coreldraw skills). The dotted lines connecting the camera show the angles of direct reflection, so if the lighting is inside those lines, the glare will be ...


4

Do something to soften the flash output. Either put a diffuser in front of the flash or bounce it off of some sort of reflector (doesn't have to be fancy -- a sheet of copier paper can do wonders). If at all possible get the flash off of the camera. Even a foot away can/will make a huge difference. A number of companies make brackets to hold the flash ...


4

I just photographed my niece this past weekend and found that going into a well shaded area really helped. I was able to get crystal clear shots of her with her glasses on.


3

You might try using a circular polarising filter, which can eliminate reflections on glossy surfaces. They reduce the amount of light coming into the camera so if you're not already you should use a tripod to make sure you're getting sharp shots. They are relatively cheap, around $30.


3

It probably will take another person to help, or you might get creative with gaffer's tape. Drape a black sheet of cloth over the top and sides of the monitor so no ambient light can directly hit the screen. Fire away with a helper holding up the cloth so you can shoot under it. Creative use of gaffer's tape (it's like masking tape but leaves no residue) ...


3

You can use a polarizer to "see-through" the reflections in the glasses. It works for certain types of lighting (sunlight, for example), but not for all.


3

Glare as you put it is more formally known as a specular reflection. This occurs when you have smooth objects where all the light bounces off in the same direction. This contrasts with rough objects which due to fragments of the surface pointing in different directions, reflects light in different directions. Most objects like your apple produce both ...


3

Are you still wanting to include the moon in the shot? If so, then think about how you control flare during the daytime and shooting into strong light sources. Use a hood to protect from off-axis flares that are outside of the field of view. Remove any non-multicoated filters from the light path as these are sources of flare. Stop down to improve ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible