Time to be with your loved ones

Time to be with loved ones

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15

What you are seeing in the photo is a specific type of lens flare known as ghosting. It is an inverted and reversed reflection of the brightest highlights of the scene. If you were to draw an x and y axis intersecting in the center of the photo, then the bright light on top of the building just left of the vertical axis is reflected the same distance below ...


11

Looks like a shutter malfunction (which fits with it only appearing at certain shutter speeds). The shutter is made of a series of metal blades, it looks like one of these blades is misaligned, which is exposing that part of the sensor for longer than it should be, hence the bright area. You can have the shutter replaced at a Canon service centre.


10

Note that this is called multiple exposures, not incremental. A good number of digital cameras of all sizes do this: Most Pentax DSLRs (K-5, K-7, K20D, K10D, K-r, K-x), the Pentax Q, all third generation Olympus ILCs (E-P3, E-PL3, E-PM1) plus the OM-D E-5, most mid-to-high end Nikon DSLRs (D300S, D700, D3X, D3S), the Canon 1D X, a number of Fuji ultra-zooms ...


9

The freezing of motion has more to do with the duration of the light than it does with the speed of a shutter. Obviously, with a continuous source of light, the only way to reduce the duration of it is with your shutter, but when you do control the light, that's a very different story. The technique I use to freeze the motion of something like water ...


5

1) extra images are just reflections from the polarizer. How can you tell? When you rotate it, they don't move. Therefore the angle doesn't matter, nor does the scratch matter. When you remove it, they go away. Therefore it must be causing it, but it is not related to the scratch or the angle being polarized. 2) The noise is just electronic noise. The ...


2

One of the advantages of doing multiple exposure shots with a digital camera is that you can fix it all up in post processing. When you do it in post processing you have great control over how the images layer. Check out this multiple exposure shot I made last summer during a parade. To get the shot I mounted my camera on a sturdy tripod and just shot ...


2

Nikon D80, D90, D5100, D7000, D300/700/800 and D2/D3/D4 all have multiple exposure mode. You can take 2 or 3 shots. There is an "Auto Gain" setting which will average the exposure values, or you can switch that off and it will add the exposures together instead. Nikon D5100 also has in-camera HDR. You take two shots at different exposures and it combines ...


2

Pentax DSLR cameras have supported it since at least K10D (can't comment on earlier models as I haven't owned any of them), don't know about other brands. Certainly it is very easy to do with any photo editor that supports layers, just set the opacity of the upper layer to less than 100% and the lower layer will show through it. Alternatively you can try ...


2

If you'll notice, the pattern of lights is a dimmer version of the lights on the tree inverted and reversed. Since it only occurs when the polarizer is on the lens, light is bouncing back from another lens element or possibly even the sensor if you are using live view and then reflecting off the back of the polarizer and back through the lens. My Rebel XTi ...


2

I don't think HSS is the right approach for this. (I'm rephrasing some notes from earlier comments I made that maybe deserve to be a proper answer.) Basically, the flash sync speed is the fastest duration for which the whole sensor is exposed with a focal plane shutter (as found in modern dSLRs). At higher shutter speeds, a slit made between the first and ...


2

You already have the answer but... The long exposure time caused the ghost. When using aperture priority with a Canon speedlite the flash will pop, effectively, instantaneously. The camera will then leave the shutter open to balance out the exposure with some ambient light. There is a custom function to fix this shutter duration at 1/200s but that is a ...


2

I would bet on ghosting/reflection as the ghost image is out of focus in the same areas where the main image (the eyes are sharp and the rest goes gradually out of focus). If it were a shadow, it would be out of focus altogether and if it was fly movement then the white area between the eyes should have drawn bright strips.


1

From what you show, there could be a few assignable causes and a couple of contributing factors. It does not look like a lens-based artifact due to the horizontal zone where the ghost appears. It appears to have a rather definite, but not sharp, cut-off. The areas affected are detailed which rules out haze or flare. They are not reversed so they are not ...


1

First, for the web only use sRGB, this is the only color space supported by all the major browsers (meaning that if you use another color space than either some visitors will see wrong colors or the web site's software will "helpfully" convert it to sRGB for you). Now, about the sharpening - most of the picture sharing web sites (and some gallery software ...


1

It doesn't solely depend on the source image quality when you're uploading your photo to a website. The website does some sampling, even may convert the image to some other format for better web usability. I am not sure which service you're using for your website or if it is a custom development or not. For example, flickr, 500px etc handles photos way ...


1

This image looks an awful lot like one in which such "ghosting" was purposefully made: see the shadow-like images beneath the chair. These ghosts have been attributed to internal reflections in the lens when a strong light source is present and the exposure is "long." Only @Karel offered this solution and, until I saw this second picture, I did not ...



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