Incense

by Bart Arondson

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17

For all the following: YMMV*, caveat emptor, no responsibility taken for advice given, you decide whether to try this at home. It may even work :-). Be aware that damage may already be fatal and/or that fatal (to the lens) damage may occur along the way. Best attitude is to regard the lens as a writeoff now, with anything you can gain from it by the methods ...


10

When attached to the camera and with the front lens cap on the camera will be pretty well protected from dust. Protecting against fungus is a matter of keeping everything dry. Placing everything in a sealed plastic bag is only a good idea if the temperature is kept warmer than when the bag is sealed. Air can hold a certain maximum amount of moisture ...


9

I live in a very humid place. So my equipment has a high risk of getting fungus. What I do is, not keep it inside. Yes, you heard me right :). I use my camera frequently and expose it to sun every now and then (sunlight is a good anti-fungal solution). Apart from that when you are not using your camera for long, make sure you have the silica gel (active) ...


8

That's definitely fungus, and it's not going to go away. The first question to ask is it affecting your image quality. If it is not then control the problem, always keeping the lens in a dry environment. You could get it professionally cleaned, but honestly for that lens you could buy a replacement for a lot cheaper. You may also want to read about some ...


5

Unless your room is very dusty, you should be fine. I did my PhD in microbiology, and from my experience, the main source of dust or dirt are (1) air currents and (2) you yourself. Avoid any air currents (opened windows, AC, ventilators). When disassembling the lens, put the elements in covered clean plastic containers (like tupperware or something). ...


5

The only course of action here is to get the lens professionally serviced. Once mould spores have got into your lens and started to grow like this there is no other way to get rid of them. In order to prevent this in the future always store your camera in a sealed bag with a couple of sachets of silica granules to absorb any moisture that may have got into ...


4

I don't think that there are LEDs that are in the germicidal UV range. All the germicidal UV lamps I have seen have been mercury vapor, which is basically a flourescent without the phosphor coating on the inside. They also have to be made from quartz, not glass, since ordinary glass will absorve these wavelengths. I don't know the UV properties of glass ...


3

There is a method, with formaldehyde gas. But formaldehyde is very very toxic and harmful. (first, read this Formaldehyde TEACH Chemical Summary) It's used for sterilization of surgical and veterinary instruments. You must use it so far away of humans and pets that you can (above all, of children and pregnants). And always somewhere outdoors, with a ...


3

Since lens replacement parts exist and there are people who know how to disassemble and assemble lenses you can say that theoretically there is no damage that can't be fixed - However in the real world there are kinds of damage that the manufacturers won't fix and even more kinds of damage where the cost of fixing would be more than the cost of replacing ...


2

As jrista said, almost any lens can be fixed, but you have to compare the cost of repair against the value of the lens. Nikon will often charge over $200 for repairs, but you can probably get a lens cleaned in most parts of the world for $50-100. You have to weigh that cost vs the cost of the lens. Repair or cleaning might cost most of the value of a kit ...


2

I recently saw on YouTube - BTW an interesting place for instructions and answers - that you should never store cameras or lenses in camera bags. The fabric in the bag is a great place for mold spores to get imbedded. So dark, moist places surrounded by lower grade of fabric invites disaster. It was suggested when cameras and lenses not in use to put them ...


2

I hate to say it, but the best thing that can be done is to get rid of it. Especially a lens like a 50mm f/2, it shouldn't cost very much at all to replace it. There isn't a good way to clean the middle elements of a lens. You've already mentioned the green spot, it'll cause enough problems. You can minimize fungal growth by protecting from the elements ...


2

The problem of fungus is not specific to a single model or brand of camera. It will happen to lenses or cameras regardless of whether it's Nikon or bridge or a dSLR lens. Whatever camera you buy, if you're living in a warm humid environment, will be vulnerable to it, and yes, fungus damage can easily total a camera let alone cost more than a repair. Fungus ...


1

The problem with your Nikon Coolpix P600 or any similar camera is that the amount of labor involved to disassemble (so it could be cleaned) and then reassemble the lens assembly would cost more than the camera is worth. And since fungus sometimes causes permanent damage to the surface of lens elements it might still be an exercise in futility. It is cheaper ...


1

+1 for fungus. You can also put it in the freezer for 48 hours, inside a plastic bag. That will kill it. As above, it won't go away though, but it shouldn't grow any more.


1

While more expensive and bulky than plastic bags and silica packs, you might consider Pelican cases or equivalent. I have a couple of Pelican cases which I use for travel, including checking my equipment through as baggage. The reason I went for the Pelican case is that it is completely sealed and waterproof. That said, I'm not sure that it will prevent ...



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